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Matthew Miller

Matthew Miller

Lives in United States Boston, United States
Works as a Systems Architect
Has a website at http://mattdm.org/
Joined on Aug 25, 2006
About me:

1996-1999: Casio QV10A
1999-2004: Nikon Coolpix 950
2004-2007: Olympus C-5060
2006-2006: Fujifilm F20
2007- : Fujifilm F31fd
2007-2007: Pentax K100D (mostly with DA 40mm f/2.8 Limited)
2007-2009: Pentax K10D (mostly with DA 40mm f/2.8 Limited)
2009-2012: Pentax K-7 (still mostly with DA 40mm f/2.8 Limited)
2009-2011: Fujifilm F200EXR
2012- : Pentax K-5ii (+ 15mm, 40mm, 70mm Limiteds)
Now you know. :)

Comments

Total: 97, showing: 1 – 20
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For what it's worth, we had this rumor for Pentax last year — http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52214695

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2014 at 23:26 UTC as 79th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

fmian: The 3-4 Metz flashes I have handled recently (modern models) felt incredibly bad. Poor component fitting. Loose door covers. Cheap feeling external materials. High price though.
If that's the first impression I got after using YongNuo and Canon flashes, then I'm sure other potential customers got the same impression.

Having said that, I've seen some old Metz flashes that were quite nice.

iudex -- look at where they're made. The Metz 36 AF5 is a licensed product, made by Tumax/Icorp http://www.icorpandtumax.com/DSL88Series.html in Hong Kong. The 44 AF and higher models are still German-made.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2014 at 21:04 UTC
In reply to:

Mike Yorkshire: Very sad news. Sadly the camera manufacturers have designed flash systems closely integrated with their cameras and then had the resulting flash made by Chinese workers. Metz would always find it difficult to keep up in this market - their products were always second to none.

For the last few years, Metz has done exactly that — all of their lower range (36 AF and down) is made in China and bears a strong resemblance to Tumax/Icorp generic rebadged flashes.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2014 at 20:58 UTC
In reply to:

ThePhilips: As cameras' high ISO performance improves, a need for a proper flash lessens.

Otherwise, as an amateur, I was always surprised by the lack of advancements in the lighting equipment. Flash designs, and the accompanying technics, are very old. The problems with them - are as old. Yet pretty much nobody tries to improve something there. Flash is still the same largish expensive-ish clunky device I have hard time to justify to buy and dedicate the space in my bag for it. As if interchangeable lenses weren't enough of the hustle.

> As cameras' high ISO performance improves, a need for a proper flash lessens.

:-/

I'd argue that the need for _proper_ flash is constant. The need for flash for taking snapshots in dim rooms may lessen, but that's basically irrelevant.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2014 at 20:56 UTC
On Pentax launches K-S1 Sweets Collection article (231 comments in total)
In reply to:

Paul Farace: In 1977 Pentax stormed the camera world with a simple SLR, the K1000, that only came in black leatherette and chrome. It dominated the lower level camera market for years... now they only seem to make pretty collectibles... sad in a way. I love my art deco box cameras but these seem to be way beyond that!

I like the one that looks like a bowl of sherbet!

Have you looked at the K-3 (or, for that matter, K-50 or K-500)? All are very highly rated as serious cameras, not just "collectables". If they want to make candy-colored models (primarily for the Japanese market, as I understand it) to bring in some money, fine by me!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 25, 2014 at 01:01 UTC
On Pentax launches K-S1 Sweets Collection article (231 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: Pentax is just doing something to set themselves apart from the competition.

They make very good APSC cameras and lenses, but so do their competitors Nikon, Canon and Sony. And it seems anything Pentax can do, their competitors can do as well or better. So they need something to set themselves apart. That something is "a mind dazzling array of color combinations."

This may sound silly, but there is a market for this. A niche market perhaps, but still a market. And if no one else wants it then Pentax will take it for themselves.

I haven't seen anyone else do prime lenses like the Limited series — that's what I'm in it for. (Possible exception of Fujifilm and their X lineup.)

Direct link | Posted on Oct 24, 2014 at 18:04 UTC
On Canon introduces new $78K 50-1000mm cine lens article (174 comments in total)

Wait, 20× magnification? Or... 20× zoom?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 17, 2014 at 02:13 UTC as 68th comment

Hmmm. Still doesn't look my idea here: http://photo.stackexchange.com/a/38329/1943

Direct link | Posted on Oct 3, 2014 at 01:40 UTC as 24th comment
On Beginner's guide: shooting high-key at home article (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

Matthew Miller: Fun and confusing fact! "High key lighting" and "high key photographs" are different concepts with different meanings and different history. The former comes to us from cinema, where "key" means the main light; the latter is much older and comes from painting and classical art, and "key" is closer to its use in music, and means the preponderance of tones — everything is shifted to a brighter average exposure, with little or no dark or black tones.

This tutorial focuses on high-key lighting, and the results aren't _really_ high key images in the classical sense (although we can argue about influence of the white background). The model's hair and clothing here have definite dark tones.

Generally, this isn't a huge difference for _high key_, since they're both kinda bright, but there is generally a different emotional effect:

* High-key image: ethereal, delicate, dream-like
* High-key lighting: cheery, upbeat, energetic

but if we go to _low key_, there's a huge difference: low key *lighting* usually means that there's a lot of contrast from a hard non-key light. This is often dramatic and dynamic, whereas a low key image in the classical sense has an overall sense of darkness, often without contrasting highlights:

* Low-key image: somber, restrained, depressing
* Low-key lighting: dramatic, mysterious, taut

In some ways this is a tangent to the tutorial, but it's something I see a lot of people get mixed up, and it's confusing when people are using a similar-sounding term to mean very different things.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 8, 2014 at 15:21 UTC
On Beginner's guide: shooting high-key at home article (69 comments in total)

Fun and confusing fact! "High key lighting" and "high key photographs" are different concepts with different meanings and different history. The former comes to us from cinema, where "key" means the main light; the latter is much older and comes from painting and classical art, and "key" is closer to its use in music, and means the preponderance of tones — everything is shifted to a brighter average exposure, with little or no dark or black tones.

This tutorial focuses on high-key lighting, and the results aren't _really_ high key images in the classical sense (although we can argue about influence of the white background). The model's hair and clothing here have definite dark tones.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 8, 2014 at 15:19 UTC as 29th comment | 3 replies
On Ricoh announces Pentax XG-1 superzoom article (195 comments in total)
In reply to:

joyclick: If Pentax can do K3 what stops them beat'em all superzoom? They have too many superzooms but none outstanding !

Simple. They stopped actually designing and making anything but DSLRs several years ago. Unlike the K-3, this isn't _really_ a Pentax — it's just a thing they commissioned and put the Pentax name on in order to make some money in an easy market segment.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 15, 2014 at 19:53 UTC
On Did Amazon just patent the seamless background setup? article (133 comments in total)
In reply to:

Eleson: So, is the road noew open for millions of patents designed as:
"Placing a flash in loc A and a flash in loc B to produce shadowing on subjects that can only be done with flashes in those two specific places."

Try taking a product shot after that. :)

Welcome to writing any non-trivial software program right now.

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2014 at 22:45 UTC
On Chicago-based Calumet Photographic closes U.S. stores article (195 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jimmy Dozer: Great. About 10 days ago, I sent in a Bowens/Calumet Monolight in to their repair facility. Now what?

Sadly, you are probably out of luck. You will be so far down the list of people the bankruptcy proceedings care about that you're probably best off just buying a replacement elsewhere.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 17, 2014 at 02:34 UTC
In reply to:

bobbarber: Given: Sensor technology gets better every year.

A. Therefore, people will need larger sensor cameras in the future.

B. Therefore, people will need smaller sensor cameras in the future.

Looking back to the history of large format, medium format, and 35mm film cameras is cheating. The logic behind your choice must come from your own ideas.

Because... god forbid we learn from history?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2014 at 20:40 UTC
On CP+ 2014: Things we found that had been cut in half article (107 comments in total)

The punchline of each of these photos seriously cracks me up. Nice.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2014 at 22:13 UTC as 12th comment

I'm not going to either criticize or complain about those who are, but: wow, there is a reason that the one with the little kid with hands on the (relatively) huge dog is the lead photo for every story. That's a great photo that really makes you do a double-take.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2014 at 03:56 UTC as 48th comment | 4 replies
On Nikon AF-S Nikkor 58mm f/1.4G review preview (413 comments in total)
In reply to:

Steve oliphant: Sorry to say but i tested this lens you should test it your self at 1.4 on a high contrast target like a focus cart with bright light on it ,there was way to much modulation transfer, the 50 1.8 G lens is a much better lens at 1.8 thats you best bet , the 58mm 1.4 is a real peace.... of doo.

That... makes no sense. The words you are using do not mean what you apparently think they mean.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 31, 2013 at 04:07 UTC
In reply to:

ballwin12: I bet this is a Chinese company, Am I right? They do nothing, just want to steal patterns from others.

Well, maybe. Sakar is a small company headquartered in New Jersey. But they don't really actually design anything themselves; they basically license different brands (like Polaroid or Vivitar or Kodak, or even Hello Kitty) and attach them to Chinese imports.

Since it tends to be very low quality and *COMPLETELY* unsupported (try getting ahold of anyone at Sakar with a technical question, let alone a support request!), I'm pretty sympathetic to Nikon here.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2013 at 02:02 UTC
On iPhone 5s Studio Comparison article (263 comments in total)
In reply to:

Frank_BR: Unbelievable, the Nokia Lumia 1020 outresolves almost all FF cameras except the Nikon D800! For example, if you compare the Nokia Lumia 1020 with the Canon 5D MkrIII you'll get the following numbers:

Nokia Lumia 1020: ~3600 LPH
Canon 5D MkrIII: ~3000 LPH

This result is even more surprising if you consider that the 85mm Canon lens was set to F/7.1, whereas the Lumia lens was wide open at F/2.2. That is, the Canon lens was operating at the optimum aperture regarding resolution, and the Lumia lens was using an aperture much more prone to degradation by optical aberrations. Even so, the Lumia won.

That's not to say it isn't impressive, of course!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 22, 2013 at 01:32 UTC
On iPhone 5s Studio Comparison article (263 comments in total)
In reply to:

Frank_BR: Unbelievable, the Nokia Lumia 1020 outresolves almost all FF cameras except the Nikon D800! For example, if you compare the Nokia Lumia 1020 with the Canon 5D MkrIII you'll get the following numbers:

Nokia Lumia 1020: ~3600 LPH
Canon 5D MkrIII: ~3000 LPH

This result is even more surprising if you consider that the 85mm Canon lens was set to F/7.1, whereas the Lumia lens was wide open at F/2.2. That is, the Canon lens was operating at the optimum aperture regarding resolution, and the Lumia lens was using an aperture much more prone to degradation by optical aberrations. Even so, the Lumia won.

I think you're making a false assumption about the "wide open" lens. Basically, all conventional wisdom is off the table here, since this lens doesn't stop down at all, controlling exposure only through digital ISO and shutter speed. That means it's optimized for the only aperture it has -- there really is no concept of "wide open" because there is nothing else.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 22, 2013 at 01:31 UTC
Total: 97, showing: 1 – 20
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