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graybalanced

graybalanced

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 11, 2009

Comments

Total: 544, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

ChowMonkey: Have fun transferring 32 GB per wifi :)

Might not be too bad if it can transfer after every exposure. You're not going to shoot 32GB in 5 minutes.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 13, 2015 at 21:14 UTC
In reply to:

dialstatic: This is my general impression of weather forecasts: only marginally better than guessing.

In any case, beautiful images - a sight I would dearly love to behold with my own eyes (and through my own camera) one day.

Weather forecasters are an easy target for bashing by the uninformed, especially when the forecast deviates significantly from what actually happens.

But if you were to compare the accuracy of today's forecasting to that of 20 to 100 years ago, you'd see a fantastic level of improvement. The amount of weather data available and beng processed is staggering. That's why the Dark Sky app on my phone can tell me that rain is 15 minutes away, and be right about it.

Sure, they predicted a huge snowstorm for NYC that didn't materialize as predicted. But all the critics miss the bigger point: At the same time, Boston got the storm it was supposed to get, and if it were 50-100 years ago, Boston might not have known it was coming and would not have had time to prepare.

"Marginally better than guessing" ? Not likely.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 12, 2015 at 23:33 UTC
In reply to:

Vegetable Police: Let's make everything wireless! It might even be safe for humans. We're not sure yet, but it could be. There's a small chance that you will not develop any health conditions being exposed to wireless signals all day long, and we like those odds.

While we have more wireless devices than ever, it is not all at the same high power, and for low-power devices you have to take into account the Inverse Square Law, which every photographer must understand if you are to make the best use of a flash.

When you take power and distance into account, you're probably not really exposing yourself to that much more radiation than 10-30 years ago.

You probably still run much higher risks with your life by driving your car out into the street.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 12, 2015 at 23:28 UTC
On Making 'Art': We go inside Sigma's lens factory article (190 comments in total)
In reply to:

chlamchowder: Looks like they're on Windows 7, with quad core CPUs (or 2-core CPUs with hyper-threading). And it looks like their CAD software is only loading two threads.

Also, standing desks...

Wow... I'll just leave the previous post up as Exhibit A. :)

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 23:36 UTC
On Making 'Art': We go inside Sigma's lens factory article (190 comments in total)
In reply to:

chlamchowder: Looks like they're on Windows 7, with quad core CPUs (or 2-core CPUs with hyper-threading). And it looks like their CAD software is only loading two threads.

Also, standing desks...

Papi61, I never said "most." I did say "widely" and that can be defended to a point.

Listen, let's just say you're right and you win, OK? Because reading through this thread, which person is right is not what stands out the most. What stands out the most is how hard you want to work to make sure Macs are put in their place. It isn't clear why you feel so threatened by platform that is supposed to be insignificant. If you want to argue with the NASA guy I quoted, that's fine. I'm fine with the claims that you made.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 23:25 UTC
On Making 'Art': We go inside Sigma's lens factory article (190 comments in total)
In reply to:

alcaher: manufactured landscape... nothing nice about it, very robotic-posthuman enviroment. But that is what it is and we use their products.

Perhaps you were referring to the book and documentary "Manufactured Landscapes" about the photography of Edward Burtynsky. The movie opens with an unbroken 8-minute shot taken by a camera being wheeled through a gargantuan Chinese factory. That Chinese factory is making much simpler goods than the high precision lenses Sigma makes in Japan.

But whether it's Japan or China, "Nothing nice about it" is not necessarily accurate. Especially when you are talking about factories in poorer countries, the factory may be the highest-paying employer around, and may have done the most to raise the standard of living in that community.

And today's high-tech work is usually much less offensive than the injurious and often crippling factories of the steam-powered Industrial Revolution in the West.

Then the "robotic" comment. Wait a minute here. If factories are such terrible, dangerous, dehumanzing environments for humans, wouldn't you want robots to do that work instead?

Direct link | Posted on Mar 9, 2015 at 21:33 UTC
On World Press Photo revokes prize from Giovanni Troilo article (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

CameraLabTester: One of the greatest challenges of any prize winning photographer these days, is NOT to get caught cheating.

Any prize winning photographer who is innocent, please throw the first camera.

.

I don't do much manipulation, just your basic darkroom type modifications, so If I won a prize and was questioned about it, the first thing I would do is say "Here is the raw file with original GPS data, you decide."

Direct link | Posted on Mar 6, 2015 at 00:17 UTC
In reply to:

graybalanced: The money may well have been squandered imappropriately, who knows. But it's important to remember that what happened here, happens to venture capitalists all the time. VCs, like movie and music companies, lose untold millions of dollars on the thousands of products and movies and albums that don't make money. The only reason they are rich is because of the few that are hits.

If you give money to Kickstarter, you ought to have the ability to withstand, both financially and emotionally, the loss of your investment. Because when you back a Kickstarter project you're being a venture capitalist and that's what venture capitalists do.

That is why "Kickstarter is not a store."

@zsedcft Can you provide a source for that number, and can you clarify whether it refers to successfully reaching the funding goal, or successfully completing a project to the satisfaction of its backers?

I can only find a Kickstarter statistic for successfully funded projects actually reaching the deadline, and it's only 39%.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 00:43 UTC

The money may well have been squandered imappropriately, who knows. But it's important to remember that what happened here, happens to venture capitalists all the time. VCs, like movie and music companies, lose untold millions of dollars on the thousands of products and movies and albums that don't make money. The only reason they are rich is because of the few that are hits.

If you give money to Kickstarter, you ought to have the ability to withstand, both financially and emotionally, the loss of your investment. Because when you back a Kickstarter project you're being a venture capitalist and that's what venture capitalists do.

That is why "Kickstarter is not a store."

Direct link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 00:18 UTC as 33rd comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

princewolf: If they don't give full refunds to backers, it's a rip-off, as that amount of money brings them huge interest in any sensible bank.

Faulty reasoning. People don't give money to Kickstarter to invest in interest-bearing accounts, people don't give money to Kickstarter expecting to get more money back. It is for investing in product development, manufacturing, and launch. The expectation is that either you get a product or you don't. In this case, you don't.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 00:14 UTC
In reply to:

J A C S: "Sony users can rest easy, though, as the company categorizes its imaging division as a 'stable profit generator."

Translated form Japanese: be worried.

Apple apparently uses Sony sensors for the iPhone camera. Sounds good, but Apple has had a way of cutting out suppliers over the years like when they started making their own CPUs.

No doubt the smartphone sensor market is many times larger than DSLR or mirrorless. If Apple ever stops using those Sony camera sensors, you'll probably see the Sony sensor division pop up on eBay by the next morning.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 20, 2015 at 01:23 UTC
On Astropad turns iPad into drawing tablet for Mac post (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

EssexAsh: "Astropad turns THE iPad into A drawing tablet for THE Mac"

The continued mangling of the language carries unabated. You would think people who claim to be journalists would have the basic understanding of grammar.

It's worth looking at the Apple site to see how Apple itself uses the iPad name. Spot the "THE iPad" and you win.

From Apple's iPad in Business web page: "Businesses everywhere are doing great things with iPad. Companies are extending the iOS platform in amazing ways, scaling iPad..."

From Apple's iPad in Education web page: "There’s a reason both teachers and students love iPad...When it comes to finding content for your lessons, iPad has something for everything you teach."

From Apple's Make Music with iPad web page: "iPad is changing how we live, work, and create...whether she’s writing lyrics at home or recording on the road, iPad has become an essential part of her process..."

Apple has a reason for not putting an article in front of some names like iPad. Other companies do it too. I once was told the legal reason why, but I've forgotten. Anyway, they do it for a reason.

It's fun to be a grammar Nazi, but a little less fun for you to be a wrong grammar Nazi.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 21:48 UTC
In reply to:

ipecaca: If you think of it, gay couples are more environment-friendly, they don't produce more people.

The flip side, WT21, is that you can have as many kids as you want but, as is observed in many many families, there is no guarantee that any of those kids will be willing or able to support you in your old age. In a lot of cases you'll be lucky if your kids don't move back in after losing a job!

If you want to be taken care of in your old age, it's a mistake to think of kids as guaranteed welfare. Instead, save and invest wisely, and keep yourself healthy.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 00:37 UTC
In reply to:

PeterD07: I've been using Affinity Photo for a couple days and although interesting at a glance it needs much work. Granted its beta but IMO a long way from final release. Brushes inconsistent, some features simply don't work. Images saved often are not saved and return unedited.I do like an alternative to Photoshop but will say it again that I wish something like this was integrated with an Aperture 3.0 functionality in file management & editing.
I use Aperture for 90% of my edits and unlike virtually all other photo editing apps which create monstrous file sizes! Yikes!! (a 30meg D800 file turns instantly into almost 200megs just for opening in CS6 or now Affinity!) Aperture does not regardless of how many edits. I do hope, however that Affinity Photo works out all the bugs and keeps it functional but simple.

@fuego6 he is talking about the normal expansion from raw to RGB. As a raw a photo is one channel, maybe 12-14 bits and often compressed. As an RGB in Photoshop or Affinity it must be expanded to 3 channel, at least 8 bits per channel but often 16 bits each.

The file size increase is mathematically plausible if the file goes from one compressed 14-bit channel to three 16-bit uncompressed channels. The increase does not happen in Aperture (or Lightroom or any other raw editor) because the file stays raw.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 16, 2015 at 07:54 UTC
On CP+ 2015: Canon shows off prototype 120MP CMOS sensor article (255 comments in total)

Between this and the new 50MP DSLRs, I'm surprised Canon hasn't started a new line of mass storage media aimed at photographers and priced for profit!

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 22:53 UTC as 15th comment
In reply to:

Forza5: As an Apple user, we need an Aperture alternative before looking for a Photoshop alternative. Perfect Photo Suite 9 is now available on the Mac app store.

I have used Media Pro through its long, sorry journey through multiple owners, and right now in the hands of Capture One, Media Pro is a neglected, decaying corpse in the sun. Wish someone would pick it up who actually cares about that software.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 22:51 UTC
In reply to:

jadot: looks good to me so far, at least for what I need an editor to do. Fairly intuitive - up and running in no time.

Could be cancelling a subscription soon.

Don't cancel too soon.

Affinity looks great, but it is far from done. They're still asking for feedback on their forum about how they should do some features that are not yet implemented.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 22:45 UTC
In reply to:

razadaz: You cannot compare the cost of this to Photoshop. Photoshop is a rental plan with no fixed rate. It can go up at a moments notice in the same way that long standing CS6 upgrade privileges to long time users evaporated over night and without warning. As far as I can see with this software is that it performs well, and that’s the most important factor. You can always add features but base performance is hard if not impossible to improve.

To those who believe Photoshop is so established it could never be knocked of its throne I have one word to say; Quark.

When I first started in computer graphics QuarkXpress was the de-facto DTP. No one ever thought its position at No 1 could ever be threatened.

@fuego6 It's true that Adobe has had an advantage over the other Photoshop wannabes in having a full suite of graphics apps for pros, not just a photo editor.

But notice what Affinity is doing here. Affinity already has Designer, a potential Illustrator competitor. This is Photo, a Photoshop competitor, and I have heard that Affinity is coming out with an Indesign competitor.

What that means is, Affinity is gradually assembling a suite similar to the one you enjoy from Adobe. This could put them a step ahead of all the other Photoshop wannabes who have no other software to complement their photo editor, and it could be a way that Affinity can compete better against the Adobe suite.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 22:41 UTC
On Apple reveals Photos beta for developers post (126 comments in total)
In reply to:

CaPi: Come on go live, guys. I need something to follow up aperture. I hate the alternatives by adobe. Their cloud plans are NOT to my liking.

Then it's a good thing Lightroom is just about the only high-level Adobe photo app that you can still buy the latest version of in a box from Amazon. No cloud and no subscription required for Lightroom.

Besides, if you've read all the articles about Photos...does it really look like Photos is a viable way to follow up Aperture? It looks like the answer is No.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 8, 2015 at 18:43 UTC
On Apple reveals Photos beta for developers post (126 comments in total)
In reply to:

LEGACYMOMENTSPHOTOGRAPHY: I do not like the idea of these clouds, for software or storage I like my software and photos on my computer and on back up drives at my house not a server room in some random place. I don't trust anyone but myself with my work.

According to all reports it is still possible to use this new Photos app without connecting it to the cloud.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 8, 2015 at 18:41 UTC
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