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Richard Butler

Richard Butler

Lives in United Kingdom Seattle, United Kingdom
Works as a Reviews Editor
Joined on Nov 7, 2007

Comments

Total: 2353, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

BelePhotography: Would be interesting to know what settings were used for the videos - especially when testing for "rolling shutter" as this is more an effect of misusage than just the camera ;-)

Ah - I thought I'd already specified, which is why I was surprised (I'll add the information now). They're all 1/50th of a second.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 18, 2014 at 17:14 UTC
In reply to:

Cameraman777: A totally useless "review".

It's not finished yet.

What was it you are hoping for? That way I can try to include it.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 15, 2014 at 23:58 UTC
In reply to:

BelePhotography: Would be interesting to know what settings were used for the videos - especially when testing for "rolling shutter" as this is more an effect of misusage than just the camera ;-)

Which settings in particular?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 15, 2014 at 23:57 UTC
In reply to:

Lab D: About the Sony "weather sealing", there appear to be a lot of threads like this for that body type...

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/54194735

No specific claims, but:

"[**Dust and moisture resistance**](http://store.sony.com/a7-full-frame-mirrorless-camera-zid27-ILCE7/B/cat-27-catid-All-Alpha-a7-Cameras)

Carefree shooting in tough environments is yours thanks to comprehensive dust and moisture resistance measures that enhance reliability by helping to prevent water and dust from entering the body. These measures include sealing around the buttons and dials, as well as a protective double-layered structure that tightly interlocks panels and components."

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2014 at 23:43 UTC
On Sony Alpha 7 Review preview (1607 comments in total)
In reply to:

guyfawkes: @dpreview.

You comment that the distortions can't be turned off in jpeg. But according to my menu structure they can, individually, or completely.

Can you comment, please?

Which page does it say that on - it'll need to be corrected.

Whether you can turn off the correction depends on which lens you mount - some of the lenses are designed with the correction as part of their design, so you can't turn off the corrections for those (the menu option is ghosted-out when they're mounted).

Direct link | Posted on Aug 13, 2014 at 18:38 UTC
In reply to:

yomasa: WHERE ARE THE VIDEO SAMPLES?

At the moment there are two on page 4 and two on page 5. More will follow.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 13, 2014 at 17:08 UTC
In reply to:

pedroboe100: Doest it say somewhere which lenses are used? sorry for being lazy

@ecm - the 25mm was used for the video comparison, since the 45mm ends up being far too long when shot with the 4K crop.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 11, 2014 at 17:35 UTC
On Updated: Nikon releases Capture NX-D 1.0.0 software article (110 comments in total)
In reply to:

LJohnK2: - No mask function
- No blemish removal
- No CCP
- No generic clarity slider
- No, No, No,

Hey Nikon com'on up here to Canada.... we have Community College Programs that have 2nd year Co-op students that can produce better than this.

What the hell is Nikon thinking !!!....seriously Nikon just open source your ADL algorithm so real programs like Lightroom can include it and be done with this.

It's something I wrote several years ago, so we can't know the situation now, but it used to be the case that Active D-Lighting, Sony's Dynamic Range Optimization and Olympus's Shadow Adjustment Technology were all based, to *some degree* on technology from [a company called Apical](http://www.dpreview.com/articles/3798759501/apical).

Direct link | Posted on Aug 11, 2014 at 16:45 UTC
In reply to:

G1Houston: Is the GH4 shot out of focus?

I don't believe so. It may have been shot with a different copy of the 45mm F1.8 than the one used with the E-M1 (we no longer have access to that copy), but I think the focus is correct.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 8, 2014 at 00:26 UTC
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: It is funny how a few years ago we would have laughed at the thought of comparing Micro Four Thirds against Full Frame cameras. They really aren’t any closer now than they were then. Both have improved drastically.

However, Dpreview seems to think they are close enough to compare now.

We're looking at them as combined stills/video cameras. The 4X difference in sensor areas is insurmountable (the large sensor gets much more light, for the same exposure shutter speed and f/number), so it's clear that the image quality of the a7S will be better.

However, the video performance, difference in video capabilities, etc, mean they're interesting to review side-by-side (I *wish* I'd called it a side-by-side review, not a comparative review).

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 21:30 UTC
In reply to:

webrunner5: Wow, The Sony 7s really has a nice look to it on the comparisons. Pretty had to beat large pixels. That is why I still have my original Canon 5D.

The GH4 looks sort of like early Nikon cameras. Pretty much needs a lot of sharping to get it up to snuff. The 7s almost looks Sigma like. Well done Sony.

Compare the a7S to other full frame cameras at a [common output size](http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison/fullscreen?attr18=daylight&attr13_0=sony_a7s&attr13_1=nikon_d810&attr13_2=canon_eos5dmkiii&attr13_3=nikon_d4s&attr15_0=raw&attr15_1=raw&attr15_2=raw&attr15_3=raw&attr16_0=12800&attr16_1=12800&attr16_2=12800&attr16_3=12800&normalization=print&widget=129&x=-0.9558045347473183&y=0.8609603905502788) and the difference is less clear-cut.

The higher-res camera will capture more resolution in bright light, and have similar noise in low light, if compared at a common resolution. And I'm afraid all of them will significantly out-perform the original 5D, when compared at a common output size, thanks to improvements in sensor technology.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 18:34 UTC
In reply to:

SiliconVoid: We understand the disappointment that the A7S does not allow 4k recording to internal media, but it tarnishes DPRs image as a respected resource to not even mention the specifications for 4k on pages 4-5 listing each cameras video recording specifications. To be honest it brings to question the maturity and perspective of your review staff who apparently decided to leave specifications out because they have hurt feelings in how those features were implemented?
Heck by page 6 where you 'compare' the video (offerings) anyone not already in the know might not think the A7S offered 4k at all unless they catch the HDMI-out line item, and were looking for a feature set spec there, but again no specifications for 4k are provided.

To many out there, both in video and general everything stills, the Sony might provide the better system to build on - especially if color/tone/dr/iso and the ability to use just about every lens out there, at native perspective and dof, are important to them.

It's in a table on page 1.
It's in the text just before the table on page 4.
It's not on page 5 because it's about a different camera.
It's in a table on page 6.

So your criticism appears to be that I've not included, in a table of internal recording options, something that isn't an internal recording option.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 00:14 UTC
On Updated: Nikon releases Capture NX-D 1.0.0 software article (110 comments in total)
In reply to:

LJohnK2: - No mask function
- No blemish removal
- No CCP
- No generic clarity slider
- No, No, No,

Hey Nikon com'on up here to Canada.... we have Community College Programs that have 2nd year Co-op students that can produce better than this.

What the hell is Nikon thinking !!!....seriously Nikon just open source your ADL algorithm so real programs like Lightroom can include it and be done with this.

@LJohnK2 - There's every chance that Nikon doesn't own the D-Lighting algorithm, so can't offer it as open source.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 6, 2014 at 16:49 UTC
On Updated: Nikon releases Capture NX-D 1.0.0 software article (110 comments in total)
In reply to:

Chris Rutt: Hey Nikon guys: you’ve done a very good job providing the Capture NX/NX2 software for the Nikonians. I was and I still am stunned by the U-point technology and use it every day. It helps me to equalize the high contrast of pictures taken for example in our mountains. You are now giving away the unique selling proposition of Capture NX2. I can only repeat the words of Bene Placito: “I think I'll be sticking to my D800e and CNX2 for a long time to come.” Or in my own words: if NX-D doesn’t get U-point technology, I think my last Nikon camera is already produced. Pity after 25 years being a Nikonian!

U-Point technology belongs to Nik Software, which was [bought by Google](http://www.dpreview.com/articles/8188974169/snapseed-google-nik).

Direct link | Posted on Aug 6, 2014 at 16:47 UTC
In reply to:

IEBA1: "Another shortcoming of many 'HDSLR's is that they capture the relatively low resolutions of video by only sampling some horizontal lines of their sensor - a process that's become known as line-skipping. This leads to lower vertical resolution in the video, along with a greater risk of moiré. "

Please. If you're shooting 4K with the GH4, (which is one of the main reasons to get it, otherwise go get the GH3) then the sensor is sampled 1:1. There is no interpolation, no line skipping and this entire paragraph doesn't apply.

That paragraph is there to highlight the problems shown by many of the existing cameras on the market - it was meant to highlight what these two offer that's different. I should have (and will), add a line making this explicit.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 6, 2014 at 15:20 UTC
In reply to:

abortabort: Will DPR be doing nice 'equivalence' charts when talking about the native lens line up considering you are directly comparing two similar cameras of completely different formats this time? Or will that paint a rosier picture for the Sony and therefore be ignored?

To a degree, that's true (though it's also the case that for these cameras more than most, it's reasonable to expect the use of non-native lenses).

Realistically, there are big differences between these two cameras, so it could be thought of as a side-by-side review, rather than a comparative one (or perhaps one that compares *with* and *to* in equal measure). The point is that we'll look to find the strengths and weaknesses of each, rather than looking to find which is 'best.'

Direct link | Posted on Aug 6, 2014 at 00:09 UTC
In reply to:

pew pew: looking at the image comparison tool, the video on the gh4 has lot of moire and aliasing while its clean on the a7s.

Ah! I see what you're saying, now.

Yes, if the ETC mode is 1:1 mapping then the camera's physical AA filter will work - hence less aliasing than its full(er)-width 1080 footage.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 5, 2014 at 21:30 UTC
In reply to:

Marko Laurits: Hello DPR,

Thanks for interesting comparison!

It would be perfect if the sample gallery included pictures made at the same place, same time, with both cameras. It would be much easier to compare the photos.

Thanks in advance!

There will certainly be some shots taken side-by-side to allow easier comparison.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 5, 2014 at 21:07 UTC
In reply to:

pew pew: looking at the image comparison tool, the video on the gh4 has lot of moire and aliasing while its clean on the a7s.

I'm not familiar with the acronym ETC. I could be missing something here.

The GH4 may have an AA filter but, for it to not be immensely strong for stills, it's not going to filter low-enough frequencies for 1080 mode. However, since 4K is 1:1, the AA filter will work, along with any filtering you add when downsizing (open the 4K still provided in this article, blur slightly and downsize).

Direct link | Posted on Aug 5, 2014 at 20:31 UTC
In reply to:

pew pew: looking at the image comparison tool, the video on the gh4 has lot of moire and aliasing while its clean on the a7s.

Other than that it should be possible to remove aliasing from the 4K footage as you downscale it to 1080.

You can still get aliasing at 1:1 pixel conversion, if you don't have a low-pass filter that blurs the edges of those pixels.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 5, 2014 at 20:18 UTC
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