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mpgxsvcd

mpgxsvcd

Lives in United States USA, NC, United States
Works as a Jack of all Trades
Joined on May 17, 2004

Comments

Total: 1818, showing: 1 – 20
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On Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 real-world samples article (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

Searching: You can hardly call these high octane samples, quite frankly I'm disappointed and was expecting more, these are quite average in every regard.

@Rishi

We need 4K video of the flogging or it didn’t happen.

Direct link | Posted on May 28, 2015 at 13:39 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 real-world samples article (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I really liked the content of the images. However, far too many of them were simply ruined by stopping down too far. That produced motion blur, shutter shock blurring, and low detail images because of diffraction.

The person taking these pictures treated the camera like it was a full frame camera. There was absolutely no reason to stop down that far in several of the images.

No wonder everyone thinks m4/3s can’t be used for action sports. If you shoot with the camera in this manner you definitely will not have a good keeper rate.

“The idea is to use as low a shutter speed as possible, that's basically the idea with panning.”
That is a very basic way to look at the problem. A more precise way to look at it is that you need to use the appropriate shutter speed to give you the motion blur you desire in the background and still keep the subject well defined.

Too slow of a shutter speed just makes everything look like one continuous object. It doesn’t portray motion if the blurring is excessive. That is what happened in several of the shots.

Direct link | Posted on May 28, 2015 at 04:43 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 real-world samples article (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I really liked the content of the images. However, far too many of them were simply ruined by stopping down too far. That produced motion blur, shutter shock blurring, and low detail images because of diffraction.

The person taking these pictures treated the camera like it was a full frame camera. There was absolutely no reason to stop down that far in several of the images.

No wonder everyone thinks m4/3s can’t be used for action sports. If you shoot with the camera in this manner you definitely will not have a good keeper rate.

@Barney

What did you have in mind? My 2nd choice would have been Turk182. Would that have been better?

Direct link | Posted on May 28, 2015 at 04:34 UTC
On P1000725 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

A great image. I really like the low angle of view.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 19:59 UTC as 1st comment
On P1010102 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

Cool shot. I really like the reflection of the helmet.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 19:58 UTC as 1st comment
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 real-world samples article (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I really liked the content of the images. However, far too many of them were simply ruined by stopping down too far. That produced motion blur, shutter shock blurring, and low detail images because of diffraction.

The person taking these pictures treated the camera like it was a full frame camera. There was absolutely no reason to stop down that far in several of the images.

No wonder everyone thinks m4/3s can’t be used for action sports. If you shoot with the camera in this manner you definitely will not have a good keeper rate.

I am not trying to single you out specifically. This thing happens every single time dpreview posts images for m4/3s cameras. I am just trying to express that this type of mistake makes it look like the camera is at fault when that isn’t necessarily the case.

I am sorry that I didn’t initially point out the good images that you took because there were some I really liked. Image 7 of the helmet was great and I really liked image 11 as well. And by coincidence both of those shots were at very fast shutter speeds.

With m4/3s you are better off erring on the side of too fast a shutter speed than having too slow a shutter speed mostly because of shutter shock issues but also because the lenses are usually very good close to wide open.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 19:56 UTC
On P1000325 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (7 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: A great idea for a picture poorly executed. The idea of an image like this is to make the car sharp and blur the background. Everything is blurry in this picture simply because the user stopped down excessively. No wonder m4/3s gets a bad reputation for shooting action sports. None of the dpreview photographers appears to know how to shoot with them.

Yes I agree that hindsight is always 20:20. However, it is very obvious that most people shoot with m4/3s cameras in the exact same fashion as full frame cameras. That is a mistake for the following reasons.

1. Native Electronic M4/3s lenses almost always offer more detail across the entire frame closer to wide open than they do closer to F8.0. For full frame cameras that isn’t necessarily true.
2. Diffraction starts at F8.0 but it isn’t too detrimental until F12-16. After that it becomes a real problem unless motion blur ruins the image first.
3. Shutter shock especially for the Panasonic M4/3s lenses is a big issue from around 1/100 – 1/320 of a second shutter speeds. Avoiding those shutter speeds has traditionally been a good idea with telephoto m4/3s lenses. However, there is always hope that Panasonic has resolved that issue with this latest camera.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 19:37 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 real-world samples article (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I really liked the content of the images. However, far too many of them were simply ruined by stopping down too far. That produced motion blur, shutter shock blurring, and low detail images because of diffraction.

The person taking these pictures treated the camera like it was a full frame camera. There was absolutely no reason to stop down that far in several of the images.

No wonder everyone thinks m4/3s can’t be used for action sports. If you shoot with the camera in this manner you definitely will not have a good keeper rate.

It has absolutely everything to do with the aperture value. If you are panning and your speed does not quite match the subject then the faster your shutter speed is the more forgiving the image will be.

He could have completely alleviated all of the issues in image 27 simply by using a faster shutter speed. The scenery still would have been blurred by the motion of panning even at a very fast shutter speed. However, the slow shutter speed he chose made it almost impossible to get this shot and keep the subject from blurring.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 19:31 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 real-world samples article (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I really liked the content of the images. However, far too many of them were simply ruined by stopping down too far. That produced motion blur, shutter shock blurring, and low detail images because of diffraction.

The person taking these pictures treated the camera like it was a full frame camera. There was absolutely no reason to stop down that far in several of the images.

No wonder everyone thinks m4/3s can’t be used for action sports. If you shoot with the camera in this manner you definitely will not have a good keeper rate.

@Sam

I simply don’t buy your argument. The shots at F22 were at very slow shutter speeds and absolutely everything in the image was blurry including the subject. Simply using F8.0 would have resolved the issue and still kept the wheels blurry even at 1/500 of a second.

Image 27 was the worst offender. The wheels blurred so much that you really can’t even see the blur. It looks more like a solid wheel than anything. Image 27 is not an image you could sell. It is simply a mistake on the photographer’s part.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 19:24 UTC
On P1000325 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (7 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: A great idea for a picture poorly executed. The idea of an image like this is to make the car sharp and blur the background. Everything is blurry in this picture simply because the user stopped down excessively. No wonder m4/3s gets a bad reputation for shooting action sports. None of the dpreview photographers appears to know how to shoot with them.

Using a faster shutter speed could have reduced the blurring in the car without greatly affecting the blurring of the surroundings. This shot was simply botched by the photographer because of a lack of understanding of the camera and its capabilities.

This was actually shot in program priority mode with Auto ISO according to the EXIF data. That mode would work for this type of shot if the photographer used the program shift function to increase the shutter speed.

It almost looks like the photographer intentionally made the shutter speed slower with the program shift function because the newer Panasonic cameras don’t usually stop down that much in program priority mode.

I really hope that one day the Dpreview photographers learn to do m4/3s cameras justice.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 19:17 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 real-world samples article (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I really liked the content of the images. However, far too many of them were simply ruined by stopping down too far. That produced motion blur, shutter shock blurring, and low detail images because of diffraction.

The person taking these pictures treated the camera like it was a full frame camera. There was absolutely no reason to stop down that far in several of the images.

No wonder everyone thinks m4/3s can’t be used for action sports. If you shoot with the camera in this manner you definitely will not have a good keeper rate.

You are far better off to shoot in shutter priority mode with Auto ISO with the Panasonic m4/3s cameras and telephoto lenses. Don’t worry about the aperture so much. It isn’t full frame. You don’t need to stop down to prevent shallow depth of field quite like you do with full frame.

Just select a reasonably fast shutter speed and let the aperture and ISO float to get you your desired exposure. This works extremely well with Panasonic m4/3s cameras.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 18:38 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 real-world samples article (84 comments in total)

I really liked the content of the images. However, far too many of them were simply ruined by stopping down too far. That produced motion blur, shutter shock blurring, and low detail images because of diffraction.

The person taking these pictures treated the camera like it was a full frame camera. There was absolutely no reason to stop down that far in several of the images.

No wonder everyone thinks m4/3s can’t be used for action sports. If you shoot with the camera in this manner you definitely will not have a good keeper rate.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 18:34 UTC as 26th comment | 19 replies
On P1000206 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

Well looky there? F8.0 and a fast shutter speed and everything cleaned up nicely. Why weren’t all of the images shot like this one instead of stopping down way to far?

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 18:30 UTC as 2nd comment
On P1000319 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (5 comments in total)

That is a pretty horrible image through no fault of the cameras what so ever.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 18:28 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply
On P1000324 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (3 comments in total)

Again stopped down way too far but it didn't ruin the image as much as it did for the last one.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 18:27 UTC as 3rd comment
On P1000325 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (7 comments in total)

A great idea for a picture poorly executed. The idea of an image like this is to make the car sharp and blur the background. Everything is blurry in this picture simply because the user stopped down excessively. No wonder m4/3s gets a bad reputation for shooting action sports. None of the dpreview photographers appears to know how to shoot with them.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 18:26 UTC as 2nd comment | 5 replies
On P1010415 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (5 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: Why choose F16 here? The image still has shallow depth of field even at F16 and yet this is way too far into diffraction. There is absolutely no reason to choose F16 over F8 here and this was shot in aperture priority so don’t tell me the camera did it.

Here are some issues that F16 could have exacerbated in this image.

1. At 1/125 shutter shock can be an issue. Going to 1/250 or faster than 1/320 greatly reduces the impact of shutter shock.
2. F8-F10 is the limit for diffraction for these m4/3s cameras. This is way past that limit.
3. Using a wider aperture could allow you to underexpose and protect highlights while still being able to effectively pull the shadows in post processing.
I really wish that Dpreview would instruct their photographers on the differences between m4/3s and full frame cameras.

If anything shoot the same thing with several different apertures and demonstrate why this shouldn’t be done with m4/3s. Too many people see this and think stopping WAY too far down is the best way to shoot with a smaller sensor camera. For this picture there is absolutely no merit in stopping down this far. Just look at the motion blur/ shutter shock in the guy’s hair. All of that could have been prevented and it simply wasn’t the camera’s fault.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 18:21 UTC
On P1010415 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (5 comments in total)

Why choose F16 here? The image still has shallow depth of field even at F16 and yet this is way too far into diffraction. There is absolutely no reason to choose F16 over F8 here and this was shot in aperture priority so don’t tell me the camera did it.

Here are some issues that F16 could have exacerbated in this image.

1. At 1/125 shutter shock can be an issue. Going to 1/250 or faster than 1/320 greatly reduces the impact of shutter shock.
2. F8-F10 is the limit for diffraction for these m4/3s cameras. This is way past that limit.
3. Using a wider aperture could allow you to underexpose and protect highlights while still being able to effectively pull the shadows in post processing.
I really wish that Dpreview would instruct their photographers on the differences between m4/3s and full frame cameras.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 18:21 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply
On P1010487 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (3 comments in total)

F14 was not the right choice here with M4/3s even at 100mm. That is well into diffraction and the depth of field was infinite. Did the camera incorrectly choose this aperture or did the user?

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 18:08 UTC as 3rd comment

It seems like Canon has said “It doesn’t matter how well our cameras do in tests. They still sell even if there are better options”. Why would or even should Canon change if consumers still keep buying their cameras?

I still wonder if the camera industry would be different today if it wasn’t for Andre Agassi and Ashton Kutcher? Those two men are probably the most influential photographers for entry level cameras ever and yet we have never seen any of the pictures that they have ever taken.

If so many people based their camera buying choice on recommendations from Andre Agassi and Ashton Kutcher why would they ever care about DR, ISO Invariance, and Highlight recovery?

Maybe the other companies should stop trying to make their cameras better and just concentrate on telling the world that they even make cameras. You can’t hope to win an election if your name isn’t even on the ballot. If no one knows you make cameras you probably won’t sell as many as the company everyone knows.

Direct link | Posted on May 26, 2015 at 17:42 UTC as 36th comment | 7 replies
Total: 1818, showing: 1 – 20
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