mobile photography technology, culture and community
www.dpreview.com
wetsleet

wetsleet

Joined on May 4, 2004

Comments

Total: 539, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
In reply to:

Jonathan F/2: What's the point of mirrorless if the lenses are the same size as DSLR lenses? Sony doesn't even have proper pro-oriented repair facilities like Nikon or Canon. At most these will be expensive toys for the well-heeled, amateur tech geek who likes to match their Sony TV, PlayStation 4 and Sony Alpha camera! Their idea of serious shooting entails sipping Starbucks ordered at the drive thru and shooting urban blandness of generic suburbia!

"What's the point of mirrorless if the lenses are the same size as DSLR lenses?"
Why would you expect any difference in the lens size (for the same sized sensor)?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 5, 2016 at 15:26 UTC
In reply to:

Tiderace: LED vary MARKEDLY in their uniformity of wavelength. Unlike blackbody light, such as the sun and tungsten lights, they can have large inconsistencies, gaps, and color casts. And to make matters worse, there are now several types of Led lights which if combined can make it impossible to correct skin color and background in post. CRI does NOT measure all the factors that are needed to examine color rendition and uniformity of wavelength of an LED. It would be very useful if DP gave us in their reviews a examination of each LED product offered not only its CRI but its actual wavelength uniformity so we could judge its usefulness for videography.

I always thought LEDs were a fixed and very precise monochromatic source, the wavelength fixed by the bandgap energy of the semiconductor junction. As such I am little surprised by the fact that all red LEDs always look exactly the same colour as each other. You don't see some a bit pinkish, others a little more purpleish.
White LEDs would be a different matter being composite devices.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2016 at 18:17 UTC
In reply to:

photomedium: Hopefully led are purchased in bulk and then tested and selected for uniform emission at some desired wavelength range. That would justify the price vs DIY.

how do you get variations in colour out of a regular LED? The wavelength is fixed by the energy band gap between the semiconductor materials either side of the pn junction, and that is not a variable AFAIK. It is an atomic property of the two materials.
I've never noticed "vast variations in colour". Quite the opposite, with any and all red LEDs in any application I am always struck by the fact that they are all exactly the same hue of red. Likewise the blues and the greens etc.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2016 at 18:09 UTC
On article The good, the bad and the analog: CES 2016 'Best of' (62 comments in total)
In reply to:

wetsleet: This glut of "360 degree" cameras - their speil all seems to imply a full sphere of vision, but you keep on with the "360 degree" moniker. Which is it please, and why the confusion of terms?

Au contraire. If you get the full horizon then you've got 360 degrees. Be that a thin strip around the horizon or a full sphere, the 360 degree measurement does not distinguish since it is only a one dimensional measurement.

My point is that these cameras do much more than 360 degrees, and to describe what they do requires a two dimensional measurement.

I'm not suggesting they talk about steradians or solid angle, since few will understand, but equally using simple degrees is meaningless. So we are stuck between the incomprehensible and the meaningless.

Unless perhaps they describe them in terms of percentage of a full sphere. I think most would understand that.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 17, 2016 at 10:17 UTC
On article The good, the bad and the analog: CES 2016 'Best of' (62 comments in total)

This glut of "360 degree" cameras - their speil all seems to imply a full sphere of vision, but you keep on with the "360 degree" moniker. Which is it please, and why the confusion of terms?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 13, 2016 at 19:34 UTC as 18th comment | 2 replies
On article Opinion: Pour one out for Samsung cameras (323 comments in total)

Let's not forget, the world's first ever webcam was for a coffee percolator, and it served a very similar function, to inform users of the coffee pot's contents. Plus ca change...

Direct link | Posted on Jan 11, 2016 at 07:33 UTC as 6th comment
On article Top 5: Hands-on with Nikon D500 (785 comments in total)
In reply to:

tecnoworld: I'm curious to see which score this camera will get on DPR. If more than Samsung NX1, then I won't read this site anymore, since NX1 has been out for more than one year and every spec is better than D500.

We could start with the viewfinder. As DPR found with the NX1, "you're not going to mistake the EVF for a true optical viewfinder".

It will be interesting to see also how well the D500 autofocus works - high hopes have been set.

For me these two things are what I look for above all else. Not that the rest is unimportant, more that most cameras do OK already on the other major aspects.

But seeing the image in the scene is paramount for me, without that there is no photo to take anyway, and so for me the immediacy of a really good OVF is a must (and one that it has taken the DSLR industry a terribly long time to approach).

Just as important, getting the critical moment in critical focus. For the want of than most of my shots are sub-par.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2016 at 14:35 UTC
On article Nikon's New D5 and D500 Push the Boundaries of DSLR (733 comments in total)

Poor focus vies with poor composition as the biggest culprit in poor photos. And of course the two are related, often it is the delayed focus which spoilt the composition.

For most people the IQ of digital cameras long since became more, much more, than adequate. So it is great to see real emphasis being put on focus capabilities

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2016 at 07:14 UTC as 87th comment

Does this thing capture a full sphere, or just 360 degrees like the name implies?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 18:19 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

tarsus: It's mysterious to me they don't make these with Shutter priority mode. It's an action camera, after all. Tried a Panasonic model for white water kayaking and it just could not keep up. Went back to my bulky dive camera with housing to get the required shutter speeds.

Set it to sport mode, I guess. Then it sets the highest shutter speed compatible with exposure and available aperture range. I imagine the aperture range is typically the constraint, especially at longer focal length, so if you tried to set a shutter priority, likely you would be asking the impossible of the other variables available to the camera.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 17:41 UTC

With wristwatches, the received wisdom is that to go swimming (not diving or snorkelling, just swimming) a watch needs to be water resistant to 100m. This because the 100m figure is a static pressure, and the movement of your arms through the water as you swim subjects the watch to dynamic pressures much higher than the static pressure of the depth at which you swim.

What is the word on water resistant cameras? This one boasts 15m. Can you actually haul it along with you as you swim? Or is it just a case of gingerly ducking it under the surface to take a pic above 15m deep, then gently getting it back into the air again, no abrupt movements under water?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 17:34 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

ProfHankD: I love the 21mm equiv. and the flip-out display is really useful for this type of camera, but the IQ of my TG-860 is a bit disappointing... and this is probably the same. They need to get a bigger sensor in there.

larger sensor = larger lens. Then the physical movement of the zoom can not be accommodated within an enclosed housing. Or the housing must be much bigger, think big enough to enclose the zoom at maximum extension. Or the zoom range must be reduced. Or the aperture must be diminished. Take your pick. Or stick with a smallish sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 17:26 UTC
On article Nikon fills in the blanks on professional grade D5 DSLR (554 comments in total)
In reply to:

xiao fei: Instead of listing ISO in millions, I think it's time to start measuring them in stops.
IE:

ISO +10, extendable to +15

If we don't do that we're going to end up with the horrible terms of megaISO and gigaISO in a few years.

just use DIN

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 16:29 UTC
On article Nikon fills in the blanks on professional grade D5 DSLR (554 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThirstyDursty: Still has a mirror...fail!

ThirstyDursty, the word you are looking for is "than".

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 07:21 UTC
On article Nikon fills in the blanks on professional grade D5 DSLR (554 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThirstyDursty: Still has a mirror...fail!

because when you look that the image that comes out at the end of it all, that is what smacks you right between the eyes - it used a mirror.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 5, 2016 at 20:07 UTC
On article Nikon fills in the blanks on professional grade D5 DSLR (554 comments in total)

ISO (ASA) 3000000?
Is it time for a return of the DIN logarithmic scale instead?

(obviously, I understand the marketing dept prefer impressively big numbers)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 5, 2016 at 20:02 UTC as 109th comment | 2 replies
On article DxOMark Mobile report: Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ (26 comments in total)
In reply to:

damian5000: Samsung is using 2 different cameras for their Edge+: Samsung ISOCELL *or* Sony IMX240. 6.828 mm (1/2.6"). They are fine for daylight.

Indoors or evening/low light, forget about it. Though viewing images as we do on Facebook and email etc, generally most people may never see the difference.

Who are you to judge? I'll believe what I damn well please about the photos I take. Of course my D800 is better, but quite often it is just not the right tool for the job, a bit like you.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 1, 2016 at 19:49 UTC
On article DxOMark Mobile report: Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ (26 comments in total)
In reply to:

damian5000: Samsung is using 2 different cameras for their Edge+: Samsung ISOCELL *or* Sony IMX240. 6.828 mm (1/2.6"). They are fine for daylight.

Indoors or evening/low light, forget about it. Though viewing images as we do on Facebook and email etc, generally most people may never see the difference.

I've only got the Note 4, but I find it takes excellent shots indoors. Over Christmas (Europe, so it's dark outside) it's the only camera I've bothered to use, capturing the festivities and gatherings. I'm more than happy with the results. The slow shutter speed coupled with IS and a reluctance to use the flash yield natural looking results with movement blur in people's hands etc adding to the overall pleasing result.

No way is this camera restricted to static dayllight and/or excellent lighting applications.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2015 at 18:53 UTC
In reply to:

Jefftan: the first pic ,A great American tradition
is very bad even for small sensor,no detail at all
why? F8 diffraction?

diffraction? ... or maybe because pine trees give off a haze of vapour.

But you are wlecome to take the same shot with your FF DSLR, of course. I think that is the point.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2015 at 09:24 UTC
On article DxOMark Mobile report: Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ (26 comments in total)

is this the same camera as in the ordinary Galaxy S6 (the flat one)?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 28, 2015 at 15:19 UTC as 7th comment | 1 reply
Total: 539, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
About us
Sitemap
Connect