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AZBlue

AZBlue

Lives in United States Buckeye, AZ, AK, United States
Works as a Real Estate
Joined on Jun 9, 2012

Comments

Total: 31, showing: 1 – 20
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On Nikon D750 First-impressions review preview (1140 comments in total)

Nikon adds a 10 to the model number to signify a product that is no longer a beta test and is what its predecessor should have been. Nikon adds a 50 to the model number to signify a real upgrade.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2014 at 20:01 UTC as 129th comment
On Nikon D750 First-impressions review preview (1140 comments in total)
In reply to:

Zoron: welll...should we be expecting a D850 with an articulating screen in 2015....same trick with D750...;p

Yes, and also why I'm not buying the D810. Because in six months there will be a D850 with lower light AF and articulating screen... Nikon wants to milk its customers through a myriad of upgrade cycles rather than offering a solid and reliable lineup that will stand the test of time.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2014 at 19:59 UTC
On Nikon D750 First-impressions review preview (1140 comments in total)
In reply to:

Carl Sanders: All these silly in between models, how about reducing the price of those that work instead of wasting money? A couple of good proven bodies instead of the wasteful rushed failures?

D800 was a failure as was the D600. Both were marred with manufacturing defects. Is that a good start for your list?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2014 at 19:58 UTC
On Nikon D750 First-impressions review preview (1140 comments in total)

Hopefully one of these days Nikon will get its sh*t together and offer a single camera with all of these features. I can't believe they launched another new camera, with a new and improved AF sensor barely a month after the D810 launch. So now the D810 AF is lacking in low light compared to D750... how's that going to sit with those who just plunked a bunch of money down on the D810?

Really, Nikon? Because you surely were in a position to put the 3500 II sensor into the D810, but opted not to because it would help differentiate the D750. I have no faith in buying a Nikon camera anymore, because whatever you do buy is going to be outdated within a few months. That's a bunch of crap when you spend over $2k on a camera.

Nikon quality is long gone.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2014 at 19:54 UTC as 130th comment | 1 reply
On Nikon D610 Review preview (332 comments in total)

SHAME ON DPREVIEW!

Where were you when everyone was posting about D600 spots? Where were you to test the D600 for this problem? DPREVIEW, you have done nothing to help members here figure out this issue. Perhaps you don't wish to rock the boat with Nikon sending you free cameras to test?

You have severely hurt your reputation here, and I very infrequently visit because I do not trust your reviews. A problem that was so widespread and admitted by Nikon to be a defect was never mentioned by you in your review. You are nothing more than a mouthpiece for the manufacturers, regurgitating their press releases. Your tests are a joke because they don't reveal problems that others experience in real world shooting.

What is the point of reviewing products if you aren't at all critical of them?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 26, 2014 at 01:13 UTC as 17th comment | 2 replies

If this is the quality of photos produced by these photographers, they deserve to get fired.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 4, 2013 at 19:08 UTC as 54th comment | 10 replies

Reporters who tolerate this are desperate. If I were a reporter and was told that now I have to capture video and photos in the field, I would flip them the bird and walk out. All of their reporters should do the same. But I guess they lack the brass to actually make a stand.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 3, 2013 at 18:19 UTC as 22nd comment | 1 reply

Asus doesn't get the tablet market. It's not about specs, it's about the experience. Asus and companies like them are applying outmoded PC thinking to tablets. Best of luck to them.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 3, 2013 at 18:17 UTC as 3rd comment | 1 reply
On Samsung introduces more Galaxy Tab 3 tablets post (8 comments in total)

Huh, I love how Samsung keeps releasing products that nobody wants.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 3, 2013 at 18:16 UTC as 2nd comment | 3 replies

While it sucks for those who have been laid off, I don't understand why this is a bad thing. News consumers want immediacy, they don't want art or composition or high level of detail. Leave the art and composition to National Geographic. For news, immediacy is king and in that vein, so are smart phone photos and videos.

Technology moves on and sometimes it renders certain jobs less secure. I'm sure that moving to freelancers has cut costs tremendously for Sun Times. Why would you keep 28 people on staff, paying salaries and benefits, when you can dramatically cut costs by only paying for the photos and videos that you really need?

Direct link | Posted on May 30, 2013 at 18:19 UTC as 101st comment | 5 replies
On Photoshop CC: Adobe responds to reaction article (1853 comments in total)

What a fluff piece, DPR? You ask a question, get a non-answer, and don't press the guy for an answer? When you ask how do they justify the price increase, they say they cut the price in half. Obviously you have different information than they do - why didn't you explore that further? Why do you just ask a question and accept a less than satisfying answer?

This is a completely ridiculous article that doesn't put anyone's mind at east. Photographers prefer Lightroom to CC? FAQs ask why do you need Photoshop? Are you kidding me? So DPR's solution is to give Adobe PR another avenue to spout off while the FAQs push people towards Lightroom and talks them out of wanting Photoshop. Sounds like an agenda to me.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2013 at 14:16 UTC as 429th comment | 7 replies
On You'll have to wait a "year-ish" for Google Glass post (76 comments in total)

Absolutely the dumbest product idea ever. Many of us spend thousands of dollars to AVOID wearing glasses and Google thinks we are going to want to wear these idiotic things that make us look like sheep?

Huge product fail.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 23, 2013 at 23:33 UTC as 23rd comment
On Facebook 'phone' comes to fruition post (16 comments in total)

Facebook fail!

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 20:07 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)

Anyone who thinks this is art probably also thinks the same thing about Joe Klamar's portraits last year of Olympic athletes. Total garbage.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 20:05 UTC as 44th comment | 3 replies
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

plevyadophy: I wholeheartedly disagree with the judge.

Put both prints up on a wall in a gallery and then ask non-lawyers, non-photographers, and non-art experts, what the fundamental differences are between the two prints and I would wager that they would say that one is bigger than the other and that's it (and they may notice that they look slightly different in finish, in the same way that gloss prints look different to that of matt prints).

And if you then told them that one was a LIMITED EDITION print but yet the second one was printed afterwards, i.e. after the Limited Editions had supposedly been completed, I also wager that they would then say that the first print can't then be a Limited Edition.

I welcome the judge's rulling as a photographer but in my "objective individual" mode I regard the decision as wrong; had I bought this artist's work I would feel cheated and wouldn't buy anything of his again.

Contd below ......

So when a photographer releases his work, he is never supposed to ever reproduce that work again because of what collectors expect? It's different with a sculpture - one piece and that's it. The same holds true for a painting. But to "own" a photograph means to own the original slide or negative. I don't see how a collector buying a photographer's work precludes the photographer from ever reproducing that work in the future.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 19:50 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

plevyadophy: I wholeheartedly disagree with the judge.

Put both prints up on a wall in a gallery and then ask non-lawyers, non-photographers, and non-art experts, what the fundamental differences are between the two prints and I would wager that they would say that one is bigger than the other and that's it (and they may notice that they look slightly different in finish, in the same way that gloss prints look different to that of matt prints).

And if you then told them that one was a LIMITED EDITION print but yet the second one was printed afterwards, i.e. after the Limited Editions had supposedly been completed, I also wager that they would then say that the first print can't then be a Limited Edition.

I welcome the judge's rulling as a photographer but in my "objective individual" mode I regard the decision as wrong; had I bought this artist's work I would feel cheated and wouldn't buy anything of his again.

Contd below ......

So when a photographer releases his work, he is never supposed to ever reproduce that work again because of what collectors expect? It's different with a sculpture - one piece and that's it. The same holds true for a painting. But to "own" a photograph means to own the original slide or negative. I don't see how a collector buying a photographer's work precludes the photographer from ever reproducing that work in the future.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 19:50 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

StephaneB: Hilarious to see comments here from people who obviously have no idea of what Eggleston brought to photography.

Seeing just a picture of a tricycle here is like saying the Grand Canyon is just another valley. And a bad one at that, there isn't even a bridge.

StephaneB, are you looking at the same photos that I am? If so, I don't see anything more than snapshots that could have been made by a 12 year-old with a basic understanding of photography. If anything, Eggleston's success is nothing more than being in the right place at the right time without needing to possess any real talent. None of the photos I saw in the above links show anything remotely artistic - even the compositions are uninteresting. There is nothing here, nothing. I applaud Eggleston for making good money on work that has no real artistic or compositional value. These images really suck.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 19:46 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

SRT201: Brilliant! Positively Brilliant! It must have taken a minute of more to compose and shoot!

It looks like he was kidding around and went for a giant tricycle effect.

I'm sure there are those who spend hours analyzing how the photo presents a deep and insightful commentary on Western society. :-)

This just goes to show that you don't need to have any talent as a photographer to "make it" in the business. People love to read meaning into meaningless photos. What a racket!

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 19:41 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

Templer: WOW! Quite shocked and saddened at the percentage of posters that are actually slamming Eggleston's work. This is a "Photography" site after-all. You would assume (I know, bad word) that maybe those that are serious about the craft of...ah hemm....Photography.... would maybe know something about the history? Eggleston is after all credited as being one of the founding fathers of contemporary color....wait for it....PHOTOGRAPHY. His body of work is extensive, consistent and highly regarded by anybody that knows anything about..PHOTOGRAPHY. He was probably photographing tricycles before most of you naysayers could ride one. His prints cost big money because he was doing his thing, his way when nobody else was. If I had the money like Sobel I would love to own an original. Some here would probably
take the money and go on a Walmart shopping spree. Better yet grab a D800 and some ND filters and go shoot a waterfall in the forest...and make sure it's centered.

The only way to own an "original" is to physically possess the negative or slide. Today, you'd have to own the electronic file and ensure no other electronic copies exist. Good luck with that.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 19:39 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)

OMG... Eggleston uses his child's tricycle as a focus target to test his Nikon F3's focusing performance. I'm rushing out right now to take a picture of bird poop. Undoubtedly that will be worth a half million dollars as a statement about our current political climate.

I'll be rich and I'll be retiring before any of you guys! haha

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 19:37 UTC as 45th comment
Total: 31, showing: 1 – 20
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