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Horshack

Horshack

Lives in United States United States
Has a website at http://horshack.smugmug.com
Joined on Jun 7, 2008

Comments

Total: 427, showing: 1 – 20
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For those who want to see how Sony's compression might be affecting their images, specifically whether the compression is causing visible artifacts, I recommend either RawDigger or my free utility, both of which allow you to see an overlay of the compression. Of the two RawDigger's is easier to use

Link about RawDigger's compression overlay:

http://www.rawdigger.com/howtouse/sony-craw-arw2-posterization-detection

And links on my utility:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52938557

And the specific post on how to download and use the utility:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52964261

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2015 at 00:58 UTC as 29th comment
In reply to:

PVCdroid: Why can't DPR take a shot of the same scene with a Nikon and either the A7R or A7Rii? What would be so difficult about that where we could see both images put through this underexposure and then pushed so far to show artifacts? I'm hearing myself and everyone else that is content with Sony RAW being called apologists. I'm not but if DPR wants to write an article on the debilitating effects of Sony's compression scheme then let's visually see the difference.

Here's a scene producing Sony compression artifacts on the A7r, compared with the D800 shot at the same time with the same lens and exposure:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52949203

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2015 at 00:53 UTC
On Sony Alpha 7R II: Real-world ISO invariance study article (374 comments in total)

Minor EDIT quibble Rishi - I would edit the following sentence:

From:
"Cameras with lower dynamic range provide less of an ability to do so, meaning that pushed files look worse than files exposed 'properly' at the time of capture."

To:
"Cameras with lower dynamic range provide less of an ability to do so, meaning that pushed files look worse than files exposed with the 'proper' higher ISO"

Because the first sentence implies a different exposure rather than just a different ISO, and a discussion of ISO-invariance is clearer when ISO is (correctly) excluded as part of the exposure.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 24, 2015 at 20:01 UTC as 58th comment
On Sony Alpha 7R II: Real-world ISO invariance study article (374 comments in total)

I know 'ISO-invariance' is the more precise term but 'ISO-less' just sounds sexier.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 24, 2015 at 19:54 UTC as 60th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Horshack: Isn't every delay 'unforseen' up until the moment you become aware of it?

If it's planned then it's not really a delay - it's just the originally scheduled time. Delay implies a change in expected scheduling and a change is never foreseen until someone starts thinking about the change :)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2015 at 01:26 UTC

Isn't every delay 'unforseen' up until the moment you become aware of it?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2015 at 20:29 UTC as 32nd comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Horshack: Question for Rishi or A7rII owners - Does the A7rII stop down the aperture when Exposure Preview is enabled, like on previous A7 generation bodies? (Sony calls it "Live View Display - Setting Effect ON"). If so, this would mean AF performance still degrades when smaller apertures are used.

It's kinda crazy how well Sony does with the hard stuff like sensors and miniaturization yet falls short on the small details that would likely require very little effort to get right. Might come down to hardware vs software prowess.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2015 at 03:36 UTC
In reply to:

Nivedita: It looks no one is interested in knowing how the similar tests have performed in Samsung NX1. I have posted my comments below, but it seems no one agree to that. IMHO it would have been better if Samsung NX1 is tested in similar fashion (and such tests can eliminate any comments on Sony bias).

What amazes me about the NX1 is its video AF. I've never seen another camera's video AF come anywhere close to the NX1 demonstrations I've seen online. Would love to see how the A7rII's video AF compares. For reference, here are a few NX1 video AF demonstrations:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0DigAgYD-QY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=znoDaqWLt9E

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2015 at 03:32 UTC
In reply to:

Horshack: Question for Rishi or A7rII owners - Does the A7rII stop down the aperture when Exposure Preview is enabled, like on previous A7 generation bodies? (Sony calls it "Live View Display - Setting Effect ON"). If so, this would mean AF performance still degrades when smaller apertures are used.

Doh, completely missed that part, thanks! It's good to see Sony improved this area. An even better solution would be an option to keep the lens wide-open during exposure preview, which would improve the lag and also make MF cleaner as well.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2015 at 22:00 UTC

Question for Rishi or A7rII owners - Does the A7rII stop down the aperture when Exposure Preview is enabled, like on previous A7 generation bodies? (Sony calls it "Live View Display - Setting Effect ON"). If so, this would mean AF performance still degrades when smaller apertures are used.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2015 at 20:55 UTC as 154th comment | 8 replies

Thanks for the test Rishi. This performance looks much better than my A7s. Although the A7s is rated down to -4EV, in practice I found its CDAF fails to acquire focus in situations where the D750 can. The A7s is much more picky about the levels of contrast need on the subject vs my D750, so AF EV ratings only tell part of the story.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2015 at 20:31 UTC as 156th comment | 1 reply
On MIT proposes new approach to HDR with 'Modulo' camera article (114 comments in total)

The concept of counting beyond beyond a pixel's saturation value isn't new but MIT's specific approach has some unique aspects to it. There are also other methods actively being researched. For our benefit it'll be better if MIT's solution (or another public institution's) becomes commercially viable first - it'll mean we'll be paying less for the technology vs some private alternatives that will likely carry more hefty patent royalty fees.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2015 at 16:38 UTC as 26th comment

Putting on my Forensic Files hat, granite is very brittle and likely absorbed a lot of the impact. The force of the lens hood hitting the granite caused the camera to rotate around and land right-side-up on the body leather, protecting it from any other damage. The German judge gave the dismount a 9.5 but the Ukrainian and USA judges were more reserved with an 8.7.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2015 at 19:15 UTC as 114th comment | 1 reply
On iFixit tears down Sony's new a7R II to find its secrets article (290 comments in total)

Don't worry, it goes back together easily:

https://horshack.smugmug.com/photos/i-dh7WrwF/0/O/i-dh7WrwF.gif

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2015 at 18:26 UTC as 51st comment

So in other words it starts off as a Sony image and then ends up as a Canon image? I kid, I kid!

Direct link | Posted on Aug 18, 2015 at 21:46 UTC as 29th comment | 1 reply
On Under the hood: A closer look at the Sony a7R II article (592 comments in total)
In reply to:

Horshack: Regarding the E-1st curtain and MILCS vs DSLRs. For an MILC, the E-1st curtain is actually a necessary solution for a problem unique to MILCs - the fact that the camera is in full-time Live View means it has to cycle the 2nd mechanical curtain shutter before the start of an exposure. DSLRs operating outside of Live View don't have this extra shutter movement - and since the movement occurs well before the start of the exposure it has much longer for its vibration to linger during the exposure, vs the 1st/2nd curtain movements during the exposure itself. With DSLRs you have the option to eliminate mirror vibration through MLUP while still avoiding the extra shutter movement by not using Live View, without the need of an E-1st curtain.

That said, the 1st mechanical shutter still produces vibration on DSLRs, even if not as much as the 2nd curtain cycling on MILCs before an exposure. For this reason DSLRs also benefit from the inclusion of an E-1st curtain, even outside of LV.

On Canon the MLUP it's a soft option toggle that you set just once; on Nikon you can use Exposure Delay in the same fashion. I wouldn't say it works particularly well, but then again MLUP (or EFCS on either DSLR of MILC) typically doesn't benefit for hand-held photography since you're either using a slow enough shutter speed where acuity will be compromised by hand-holding, or a fast enough speed where it wont matter anyway.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 18, 2015 at 01:08 UTC
On Under the hood: A closer look at the Sony a7R II article (592 comments in total)
In reply to:

Horshack: Regarding the E-1st curtain and MILCS vs DSLRs. For an MILC, the E-1st curtain is actually a necessary solution for a problem unique to MILCs - the fact that the camera is in full-time Live View means it has to cycle the 2nd mechanical curtain shutter before the start of an exposure. DSLRs operating outside of Live View don't have this extra shutter movement - and since the movement occurs well before the start of the exposure it has much longer for its vibration to linger during the exposure, vs the 1st/2nd curtain movements during the exposure itself. With DSLRs you have the option to eliminate mirror vibration through MLUP while still avoiding the extra shutter movement by not using Live View, without the need of an E-1st curtain.

That said, the 1st mechanical shutter still produces vibration on DSLRs, even if not as much as the 2nd curtain cycling on MILCs before an exposure. For this reason DSLRs also benefit from the inclusion of an E-1st curtain, even outside of LV.

The process is the same as without MLUP - compose first, then shoot. Only difference is a longer black-out time.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 17, 2015 at 20:21 UTC
On Under the hood: A closer look at the Sony a7R II article (592 comments in total)
In reply to:

Horshack: Regarding the E-1st curtain and MILCS vs DSLRs. For an MILC, the E-1st curtain is actually a necessary solution for a problem unique to MILCs - the fact that the camera is in full-time Live View means it has to cycle the 2nd mechanical curtain shutter before the start of an exposure. DSLRs operating outside of Live View don't have this extra shutter movement - and since the movement occurs well before the start of the exposure it has much longer for its vibration to linger during the exposure, vs the 1st/2nd curtain movements during the exposure itself. With DSLRs you have the option to eliminate mirror vibration through MLUP while still avoiding the extra shutter movement by not using Live View, without the need of an E-1st curtain.

That said, the 1st mechanical shutter still produces vibration on DSLRs, even if not as much as the 2nd curtain cycling on MILCs before an exposure. For this reason DSLRs also benefit from the inclusion of an E-1st curtain, even outside of LV.

Still not obvious to me. I've used MLUP hand-held outside of LV.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 17, 2015 at 20:15 UTC
On Under the hood: A closer look at the Sony a7R II article (592 comments in total)
In reply to:

Horshack: Regarding the E-1st curtain and MILCS vs DSLRs. For an MILC, the E-1st curtain is actually a necessary solution for a problem unique to MILCs - the fact that the camera is in full-time Live View means it has to cycle the 2nd mechanical curtain shutter before the start of an exposure. DSLRs operating outside of Live View don't have this extra shutter movement - and since the movement occurs well before the start of the exposure it has much longer for its vibration to linger during the exposure, vs the 1st/2nd curtain movements during the exposure itself. With DSLRs you have the option to eliminate mirror vibration through MLUP while still avoiding the extra shutter movement by not using Live View, without the need of an E-1st curtain.

That said, the 1st mechanical shutter still produces vibration on DSLRs, even if not as much as the 2nd curtain cycling on MILCs before an exposure. For this reason DSLRs also benefit from the inclusion of an E-1st curtain, even outside of LV.

What prevents MLUP from being used without a tripod?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 17, 2015 at 18:37 UTC
On Under the hood: A closer look at the Sony a7R II article (592 comments in total)

Regarding the E-1st curtain and MILCS vs DSLRs. For an MILC, the E-1st curtain is actually a necessary solution for a problem unique to MILCs - the fact that the camera is in full-time Live View means it has to cycle the 2nd mechanical curtain shutter before the start of an exposure. DSLRs operating outside of Live View don't have this extra shutter movement - and since the movement occurs well before the start of the exposure it has much longer for its vibration to linger during the exposure, vs the 1st/2nd curtain movements during the exposure itself. With DSLRs you have the option to eliminate mirror vibration through MLUP while still avoiding the extra shutter movement by not using Live View, without the need of an E-1st curtain.

That said, the 1st mechanical shutter still produces vibration on DSLRs, even if not as much as the 2nd curtain cycling on MILCs before an exposure. For this reason DSLRs also benefit from the inclusion of an E-1st curtain, even outside of LV.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 17, 2015 at 17:33 UTC as 108th comment | 9 replies
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