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An Instagram feed you have to follow: @muradosmann

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Photographer Murad Osmann shares images of his girlfriend leading him around the world, including through the canals of Venice, via his Instagram feed, @muradosmann.

It's worth following Murad Osmann's Instagram feed to watch him following his girlfriend around the globe.

Osmann, a professional photographer and executive producer for the film company Hype Productions, began sharing images of his gorgeous girlfriend leading him around the world in October 2011. The photos capture Osmann's perspective perfectly: you see the backside of his attractive girlfriend, her hand clutching his, as they roam from Barcelona to Moscow to Hong Kong and beyond. He uses the #FollowMeTo hashtag to identify the images in this series, though his feed has plenty of other landscape and architectural shots worth seeing. 

Update: Though Osmann started the series using his iPhone, he's now shooting with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II and a Fujifilm X-Pro1. He uses Photoshop and the plug-in LucisArt to manipulate his images.

The Russian-born photographer who now calls the UK home clearly has a penchant for HDR imagery, but  the dreamlike quality is used well here as the viewer falls into the jet-setting fantasy that is Osmann's reality. 

As his girlfriend takes the lead, photographer Murad Osmann documents the couple's travels to Hong Kong ...
to Berlin ... 
to Bali ...
to Singapore ...
and to the sky -- all using the #FollowMeTo hashtag.
Even a trip to IKEA is captured as part of the couple's travels.
Osmann and his girlfriend, as captured via photo booth.

Comments

Total comments: 54
wansai
By wansai (Mar 10, 2013)

great theme and shots but way ruined by the heavy handed use of filter/post process. i'm constantly being distracted by the processing when i'm trying to focus on the subject.

0 upvotes
dreamingoflulea
By dreamingoflulea (Mar 8, 2013)

Instagram filters are getting really boring, almost annoying after a while, because it's so repetitive

0 upvotes
Raincheck
By Raincheck (Mar 2, 2013)

Hmmm... seems a bit cheesy to me. Errr, did I mean cheeky. No, cheesy I think. Well, maybe cheeky-cheesy. That's it; Cheeky-Cheesy.

... with canned Spam. Well, maybe bacon. Er, no. You know that Deviled Ham in a little paper-wrapped can? That's what it is, Cheeky-Cheesy with Deviled Ham.

... with extra cheek.

0 upvotes
Pierre Daigneault
By Pierre Daigneault (Mar 1, 2013)

Great idea.....I like the continuity. Unfortunately the HDR or Insta stuff is waaaayyyyy too harsh in a number of photos which destroys it for me. Nice touch to change the outfits to suit the location. Also fun to have the gf in the shopping trolley at Ikea (this one was also spoiled but over HDR/Insta).
I don't have an issue with the final photo. Unfortunately I am not a label basher and so did not recognise the "Aviators" or the T-shirt.....sorry....my bad......

2 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 2, 2013)

Aviator is a style of sunglasses that was originally designed for and worn by pilots....aka aviators (that's what they called pilots back in the day). I didn't bash a label, I bashed a look. There are two extremes of conformists: those who don't try to hide it and those who do. Those who don't hide it are the people who buy Apple products or Beats headphones just to be cool (not implying there is anything wrong with either brand, by the way). Those who do try to hide it try for a look that includes a similar style but items that you can't find (universal "you" in this case) because they have something utterly unique. Hipsters. Go look up instructions on how to be a hipster (verbal-vomit.com or wikihow, etc). It's hilariously true.

Comment edited 58 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Dédéjr
By Dédéjr (Mar 1, 2013)

It was allright up to Ikea!!

Seriously now not a bad idea, fun stuff i suppose.

Problem is a society which does dictate what we should find funny cool sexy intellectual or be outraged about, all countries and cultures do this though, now it is global.

0 upvotes
Conan
By Conan (Mar 1, 2013)

Ultimately, I find this series difficult to relate to as this individual clearly has a lifestyle that few of us will ever share; however, that's sort of the beauty of mobile photography and social sharing--we get insight into other people's lifestyles. So the fact that this guy is young and has an attractive girlfriend and flies all around the world isn't really what bothers me about these. Rather, I'm bothered by the way in which these photos reduce his girlfriend to a sexual object leading him towards fantastical adventures. We get no sense of who she is, of whether she's enjoying herself (she probably is, I know I'd like to go to those places, excepting maybe IKEA), or even what her face looks like; she quite simply has no identity beyond the shape of her backside. Of course the possibility lies that dpreview chose an unrepresentative selection of photos, and in that case the fault lies with them, but I'm not inspired to pursue this fellow's instagram feed by what I've seen here.

4 upvotes
C.Eaton
By C.Eaton (Mar 1, 2013)

This is excellent; reminds me of the video where the guy walks towards the camera as the background changes to scenes all around the World.
A different take on a well-worn theme, bravo!

3 upvotes
Hulamike
By Hulamike (Mar 1, 2013)

You all sound like a bunch of geriatric gear freaks. I suppose you think your cookie-cutter, Hipstamatic, bleached, scratched, vignetted, rayed, look alike canned "Art" is more appropriate. Right!

This guys idea is awesome! His GF is awesome! His editing and color is awesome. The whole thing is fun and interesting. Really, its time for some of you to get a clue, broaden your perspective maybe, unclench those buttocks.

-Mike, age 66.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 1, 2013)

This isn't cookie cutter? You know Instagram is pretty much exactly as bad as Hipstamatic, right? They're both basically the exact same thing with slightly different horrible filters that eat away like acid at the foundations of real photography.
It's a matter of perspective and experience of course, but it's funny how old male photographers are so taken by some of the things younger folks are inundated with, overwhelmed by, and sick to death of on a daily basis. Tell you what, Mike, when every person you know on every social network is suddenly seen as a unique and creative photographer because they picked up a phone yesterday and took their first picture of a tree using Hipstamatic or Instagram then you can tell everyone how great these pictures are.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
4 upvotes
Dédéjr
By Dédéjr (Mar 1, 2013)

Wish I could nominate this post for post of the year!!

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Aaron Tsuru
By Aaron Tsuru (Mar 1, 2013)

howard is one bitter mammer jammer. "real photography", lol.

Dare I ask, what is "real photography"? Are their rules or tools or things we aren't allowed to use? Are their venues we aren't allowed to take advantage of or post images in? Is their a camera requirement or maybe a height requirement? Or is it just an angry men club?

2 upvotes
Hulamike
By Hulamike (Mar 1, 2013)

Howard, I actually agree with you but there is a uniqueness exhibited in this work that is quite different from the one button wonder shots unthinking Instagrammers make; namely concept and execution. I see a variety and subtlety in approach here. Makes for good imagery. Isn't that what photography's all about? Image? Besides, this isn't the guys pro commercial work, just playfulness highlighting a global career (jealous) and a very sexy girlfriend. Woof!

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
1 upvote
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 3, 2013)

Aaron, "real photography" is the artform of photography as opposed to the utility of photography which is recording an image onto a medium. Art is in the eye of the beholder and I wouldn't presume to tell anyone what they should think of as art, but when you see a snapshot that you took and it's a bad photograph but it still recorded something that you personally find valuable you know the difference...if everyone on the planet sees just another snapshot then nobody will think it has any artistic merit. When the primary focus of an image is the effect caused by a digitized filter that lends an image the appearance of age or makes it look like another piece of hardware or medium was used to create it, then it is using artifice in place of art. Think it's art all you want, but when every 10 year old on the planet can crank out the same "art" in their sleep I don't think it's art any more. Hulamike, I agree that concept and execution exist here and has a creative, artistic merit.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 3, 2013)

And one more think, Aaron. The word "art" exists for a reason and that is to distinguish certain things created by man from other things created by man. Art tends to point to something invoking an emotional response, which covers a lot of area, but the existence of the word and how you interpret its meaning implies that there is a DIFFERENCE between art and other things. If everything is art to everyone then nothing is art. It's the emotional aspect to art that makes it such a fluid concept, but each person gets to look at things and say that it is or isn't art to them. When I see a computer making what would otherwise be crappy picture look artistic then I would say the artist is the computer programmer, not the photographer because he didn't have very much to do with the creation process (at least in relation to the properties of the image that actually appeal to an audience). It may still be art, but the art has been disconnected from the artist.....making it crap.

0 upvotes
LifeIsAVerb
By LifeIsAVerb (Mar 4, 2013)

"We have no art. We do everything as well as possible."
—Balinese saying

"I make pictures and someone comes in and calls it art."
—Willem de kooning

Point being that any kinds of absolutist notions about what constitutes art aren't particularly useful and are highly challengeable.

0 upvotes
javidog
By javidog (Mar 4, 2013)

How truly sad it must be for howardroark to have spent his entire life studying and pursuing photography and arrive at this point and be utterly clueless as to what defines it. Stop trying to inform us about what art is or should be and just live and let live Howie. The pictures are great! No photo Nazi should be able to dismiss or discourage someone's creative manner of capturing the moments of their lives. It is a free, connected and open society that continues marching forward despite the haters.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 5, 2013)

Defining photography isn't what I was trying to do. I was expressing what I found to be a creative and meaningful use of photography. You know photography is used in manufacturing environments as part of the quality control process, don't you? Does that make photographs of machined parts or produce a thousand times a second art? Does a picture taken by a human and then baked by one of 17 filters in a photo app make it art? I suppose if these photos weren't so overcooked, contrived, and overflowing with ego I might have liked them. I'm glad you think they're so wonderful. The idea is indeed somewhat creative. The effect is not to my liking. I haven't tried to convince others they shouldn't like them, I've only stated why I don't like them. Waxing philosophical on art was a response to being antagonized about me not being of the same opinion as another person who is probably another hipster defending his fast-food art brethren. Just because I don't care for it doesn't...

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 5, 2013)

Mean I hate it. I may dislike the type of person that would take THAT picture of himself, objectify his woman, use horrible filters to obscure what might otherwise be an interesting scene, but I have also recognized the creative aspect. Thank you for telling me I'm wrong for disliking them. The hater calling others haters. Don't tell others that they are imposing their opinions on everyone when that's exactly what you're doing.
I'll tell you the difference between my photography and the photography of some others: I don't send it through a programmed subroutine designed to make the shooter feel like an artist, shove it in other people's faces, and then complain about people being distracted by the artifice rather than only seeing the creative aspect. The idea is good, but I think the pictures are so filled with bravado that I can't concentrate on what, if anything, the artist is attempting to convey. Enjoy your Instagram and Hipstamatic apps and quit defending others (read:you).

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Chuck Lantz
By Chuck Lantz (Mar 5, 2013)

Cameras, from the most basic to top-of-the-line, are just tools that are often used to create art. If the person doing the creating wishes to call it "art", then it's art, pure and simple. It may not be great art, or even halfway decent art, but it is art.

And to borrow a line from Sol Lewinsky, these words are not art, just because I say they aren't.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 5, 2013)

Art is so much more than what an artist, or a creator of what others think of as art, say or think. There are so many things that are put in the Guggenheim or MOMA or a tiny local art space that nobody would have ever considered art when designing it (a functional discipline that includes artistic aspects) or by others of the time period when it was created. Intent, age, relevance, associations, shape, color, form, context....so many things intrinsic to the piece and extrinsic (from the eye and perspective of the viewer) go into making something art, good art, bad art, or strictly something that nobody ever notices as art. The time variable, the age of a photograph, is what filter/affect-centric apps play upon. Playing upon our sentimental natures, the apps give an image the appearance of age (the time period it was taken) or wear (as though the photo has taken a beating) and that weather-beaten or old-timey look makes us think of old photos in an album. May be art, but it's cheap.

1 upvote
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 5, 2013)

As for the artist, whether he is an artist or not is for others to decide. If art is created that implies it is put out into the world for others to consider, and at that point the art no longer belongs to the artist it belongs to the world, at least philosophically speaking. Someone may be a photgrapher, a sculptor, a writer, a painter, but a humble person doesn't think of himself as an artist. He thinks of himself as a tool through which ideas are expressed. Van Cliburn recently passed away and he always considered himself part of the very instrument that he played rather than something above what he was creating. He expressed what others had created, and yet as part of the creative process others considered him a great artist. When an artist says he's created art, that may or may not be true, but one thing is for sure the guy isn't worth talking to....unless you're just as much of a egoist as he is. When someone says "I'm wise" you can bet your bottom dollar they're a fool.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
dreamingoflulea
By dreamingoflulea (Mar 8, 2013)

@ howardroark
couldn't agree more with you about instagram, hipsta and all the rest of it. It's funny how even bad, boring pictures once processed with Instagram and the likes trick people into believing it's art.

I don't get though why you think this guy objectifies his girl friend. She looks good and he seems to be proud of her. What's wrong with that? Granted in some pictures she's rather sexy looking which diverts the attention from the cityscapes, Still see nothing wrong with it, unless she wasn't happy with taking such a prominent role, but there's no reason to believe she is.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 8, 2013)

Women can be objectified, even with their full knowledge, and still be happy about it. That is certainly a judgement call since it comes down to the intent of the photographer and not the feelings of the subject. I can understand why you don't think she's being objectified, but I don't agree with you. I'd be less inclined to believe she was an object in these photos if the context was different as well as the composition.
I've made no secret that the heavy editing through Instagram, the theme and locations of the shots, the majority of the images being revealing, and the image of the photographer himself lead me to my dislike of the series and the photographer himself. I can't judge his character with certainty, but if I met the guy face to face I'd certainly go in with a certain expection. Either way, it's simply a matter of taste.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
fibonacci1618
By fibonacci1618 (Mar 1, 2013)

This is DPRConnect, not DPReview, and so I would have thought that "mobile photography, culture and community" is wide enough to cover news articles like this one.

I'm happy to see articles like this, it is interesting and creative, and to me newsworthy. As for whether the photos look HDR-like, photo-shopped, unreal, etc... All I can say is that the photos were taken using Instagram and filters... Isn't that what it's all about?

1 upvote
WilliamJ
By WilliamJ (Mar 1, 2013)

Me, my vacations, my nice girlfriend, my HDR overdose... and I. Sorry but just one word comes to my mind: grotesque !

6 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Mar 1, 2013)

Come on now, is there no other worthy news out there about photography? If you have featured this guy, might as well feature all those 100million lurker instagramers out there. And every photographer that says I am going to shoot this and that with iPhone and iPad. Their concept is cool but please keep it within Instafixers site.

3 upvotes
Oliver Lang
By Oliver Lang (Feb 28, 2013)

Connect, this article is irrelevant to the potential experience of mobile photography.

Mobile photography offers an amazing opportunity to experience a photographic community, and a chance for international, interpersonal connections.

You choose who to follow, you choose who to un-follow you curate your experience.

With respect to Osmann, whatever creativity you're looking to emphasis here does not in any way factor in what I value in mobile photography.

0 upvotes
dyoon153
By dyoon153 (Mar 1, 2013)

Give dpreview a break.
You shouldn't have to curate what contents dpreview posts.
Maybe you haven't, but I personally got some inspiration from these few images in regards to mobile photography, I think that should be worthy enough to be one of their posts.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
Oliver Lang
By Oliver Lang (Mar 1, 2013)

Glad to hear it @dyoon153, what I say might be a bit harsh.

The images may inspire you, but the way this article presents them as a "must follow" is totally against my experience of mobile.

0 upvotes
Jane79
By Jane79 (Feb 28, 2013)

It would be cool if the pics were real.

1 upvote
steve ohlhaber
By steve ohlhaber (Mar 1, 2013)

I agree, the lighting looks different, the outlines around the person are not normal looking.

2 upvotes
PhD4
By PhD4 (Mar 1, 2013)

Would it?

1 upvote
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 1, 2013)

When using Instagram how can one tell the difference between reality and complete fabrication? Even when a picture is real there are options to convert a vast majority of the pixels into overbaked garbage.

2 upvotes
SirSeth
By SirSeth (Feb 28, 2013)

It's an idea that I haven't seen before. It's a bit romantic imo and good creative fun. I'm of the opinion that not all good photography is "serious" photography. I would love to see the shot of them walking down the isle on their wedding day and into their life together becoming even more creative with their expression and theme.

Blasting someone in comments... seen that before. ;)

2 upvotes
joe6pack
By joe6pack (Feb 28, 2013)

Looks shopped to me... especially the Singapore pic

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 1, 2013)

It's not shopped, it's Instagrammed....the same thing only using a meat cleaver instead of a scalpel. No, not even a meat cleaver, it's using a dull axe instead of a tiny endoscopic laser scalpel.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
tazmac
By tazmac (Feb 28, 2013)

He must be busy working 9-5 in the office, but still manages time for all these fun!

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Feb 28, 2013)

Really? I have to follow this guy's Instagram feed? I have to see what a guy who wears the signature of the highest class of dbag, the aviator glasses, is doing with his girlfriend? I have to find out what this tool's next excuse to take a picture of his girlfriend's butt is? I really need to know that a pretentious, self-involved, Instagram using excuse for a "photographer" is jetsetting around the world with his girlfriend? Why? So I can see what the latest combination of facial hair, sunglasses, and hipster tshirt is the stereotype for an egocentric jerk? That's the only valuable aspect of these photographs I can find.

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
20 upvotes
Aaron Tsuru
By Aaron Tsuru (Feb 28, 2013)

Oh my... someone's tightie-whities are extra tighty today!

4 upvotes
Vlad S
By Vlad S (Feb 28, 2013)

talk about prejudice...

2 upvotes
happypoppeye
By happypoppeye (Feb 28, 2013)

Oh wow ...and you actually spent the time to write a comment like this ...hahahaha ...I followed, he has some great pics. Other than that I never met him so I can't really comment on his hair, clothing style or girlfriend.

4 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Feb 28, 2013)

If I hadn't seen that last picture of this guy with a look on his face like he's the coolest guy he's ever seen then I might have been a tad more forgiving. Even so, the use of Instagram and taking pictures of his woman's back side is enough to put his art under the category of something that can be forgotten once seen.
The great thing about the internet is anyone can post their pictures and ideas assuming someone will care, and anybody can look at it and think it's the coolest thing ever or a desperate attempt at validation. I'm voting for the latter.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
8 upvotes
plainwhite
By plainwhite (Feb 28, 2013)

Irregardless of what his personal character may be, the concept of his "follow me to" is a fun and interesting escape during a 5 minute coffee break. No harm there.

8 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Feb 28, 2013)

A fun idea, yes. Something I should expose myself to more than once, no. As I implied before, it helps to not have any idea who an artist is if you're going to appreciate their art. I still wouldn't have cared much about these photographs, but I would have only suspected what the guy shooting this stuff was like rather than having a bit of evidence that he is trying to compensate for the vacuous hole where his self-respect should be.
He vacations all over. He's hip enough to shop at IKEA. His girlfriend is the type of arm candy he enjoys showing from behind. If he was called upon to fly a cutting edge top secret fighter jet he'd have the glasses for it ready to go. Does getting seven thousand likes on Instagram make him feel like he's making the right decisions in life? I really hope so. :) Does my smiley face make me seem more like I'm just giving him a good-natured ribbing? :P

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
klopus
By klopus (Feb 28, 2013)

These intense rants about hipsters, glasses, shirts, IKEA, etc. , all about somebody whom you don't know and solely based on his photo booth snapshot, are totally bizarre and hint at author's personal problems.

6 upvotes
ric63
By ric63 (Feb 28, 2013)

Well well howard,
I was always told that jealousy is a curse.
And your origianl reply smacks of just that.
I loved the images as they made me smile, and it was just "interesting" to see the pair involved at the end.
The set was fun, great to look at and I admired that the guy and his girlfriend took the time to create something that others (except you) would enjoy.

It sounds like you want a pair of those aviator sunglasses and would just LOVE to fit (and look as good) into one of those "hipster" T shirts.

Enjoy peoples creativity howard, dont put your life into dumb replies like you have with this.

3 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Feb 28, 2013)

So you're right and I'm wrong? Thank you for wasting your time correcting my poor behavior and giving me your parental wisdom. I should have stated the possibility that the poor guy was dating a lunatic who was forcing him to dress like that. Having dated someone gorgeous and completely insane I should have immediately recognized the possibility. If that is the case he's still not someone I would admire.
I'm in reasonably good shape and I could rock the hipster look if didn't mind being a total hypocrit, which is exactly what a hipster is. The truth is I have a bad case of hipster overload. He may be creative and you may be jealous of his youth and his girlfriend, the overall impression he presents is narcissism. Creative or not, the desperation and ego dripping out of the collection detracts from the fun of the idea itself. Maybe fewer g-strings, butt cheaks, and "look at how adventurous I am" shots would have been less distracting/obnoxious. I did enjoy the creative aspect.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
Oliver Lang
By Oliver Lang (Feb 28, 2013)

I also disagree with the title of this article, although if you're looking to get someone's attention, hyperbole is certainly an effective method.

There is no such thing as "have to" in Instagram, nor Eyeem, nor Flickr, not 500px. These services are not prescriptive, they're curatorial. You choose who to follow, and although users are sometimes suggested - you're not told who to follow.

This article title goes completely against the nature of the experience on photography sharing social media services. This is a BAD article for representing mobile photography experience.

It's made worse when the concept (instagram feed) chosen is one dimensional. These images are impersonal, cookie cutter images of experiences as opposed to photographs that are the experience.

Connect, you have to never produce articles like this again.

4 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 1, 2013)

Just for the record, I have no objection to someone recommending photography they like...I just don't happen to agree with Erin about this being wonderful and worthy of following. She saw something unique, liked it, and wanted to share it with others. For that, I commend her. On a strictly creative level there's at least a fun idea here. I dislike the execution, that's all. My original post was a gut reaction to everything I disliked about it, but nothing is ever quite that simple.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
4 upvotes
ric63
By ric63 (Mar 1, 2013)

Hi Howard,
That is a good reply, and I guess should have been your origianal one (IMHO)
I get what you are saying by this last reply.
I will be enjoying some simple photography this weekend, I hope you can enjoy the same.
All the best.

1 upvote
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 1, 2013)

No, I stand by my original response. Anyone who uses their photography to show off their girlfriend, vacations, and posts an image of himself looking like a punk is, indeed, a punk. Sometimes that's not a bad thing in a photographer. I mean, there are times when ego serves its puproses. Creative ideas aren't the sole realm of the humble and self-effacing, and sometimes limits are pushed because someone is brave enough to follow his own path and rebel. I don't see that here.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
PhD4
By PhD4 (Mar 1, 2013)

Stop whining and just enjoy that nice butt and thong in Venice.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Mar 1, 2013)

Drooling over a female body and giving a crap about this dbag's "art" are two very different things. And I love it when people whine about everyone whining.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 54
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