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LUUV starts Indiegogo campaign for 3D-printed camera stabilizer

16

LUUV is a Berlin-based start-up that is aiming to produce and market a camera stabilizer for smartphones and actions cams, such as the GoPro. There is an abundance of similar devices available already but LUUV's design is unique because it allows for upside-down filming at very close proximity to the ground. Its developers also promise easy control with your thumb and index finger, and a quick balance setup for the capture device you are using.

It's also worth mentioning that the LUUV device is a 3D-printed product. Current prototypes are made on smaller printers but production will be shifted to industrial-strength 3D-printers once the designers are content with the final product.

Today LUUV has started an Indiegogo campaign to fund its ventures. Backers can pre-order a LUUV for $199 which is a $150 discount compared to the final retail price. Other backing options are available as well, including a video-shoot with your LUUV in Berlin for $1,900. 

Via: Techcrunch


Comments

Total comments: 16
OurJeepLife

I just sent them an email explaining my issue. I'd really like for them to help me create a new adapter that will work in conjunction with this device. Will keep you posted on their reply.
The device is worthy of what I need it for, seeing how I've been attempting to create my own system.. But without any skills in math or geometry etc.. I'm at a stand still.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson

This one stabilises so that it does not tilt, but you can rotate the camera around without any problem. Is that what you want? Not being a movie maker, I do not know.

Second question. I first thought that rounded thing was very heavy and therefore was hanging down. But ... then I saw that he tilted it upside down? So ... I assume it is balanced? I can understand that this also will work. But .... I would assume such a solution would need a longer arm with heavy weights at both ends. No?

0 upvotes
Daniel Lauring

$350 for retail price is insane. Why a kick starter project for something you aren't going to tool up. Arm seems too short for sufficient stabilization.

1 upvote
bobus

Seems like printing is much too expensive. Other manufacturing processes like injection molding should be adequate and much cheaper.

0 upvotes
michael_alabama

Depends on the lot size. Base cost of tooling is high. Best approach if unsure of the success....

0 upvotes
Suntan

Better approach, become sure of success then tool up to reduce product cost. Otherwise skip and think about other products that can be successful...

-Suntan

Comment edited 6 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
joe6pack

They turn the thing upside down to shoot floor footage and then the video will be up-side-down, right?

0 upvotes
bobus

That can be easily fixed in Adobe Premiere Elements.

0 upvotes
0MitchAG

Point is, a design change would have avoided that.

0 upvotes
bobus

LOL. If you say so, 0.

0 upvotes
jtmon

Not with a gopro which lets you flip the video in camera.

0 upvotes
Jan Privat

It is quite expensive: $199

For $49, maybe. But not a single dollar more.
FCPX is doing a pretty good job stabilizing footage, which you took with a little bit of care.

1 upvote
sodacan

That's the price for one of the limited early bird solutions. The actual retail price is $349 which brings up this: what are they smoking?!

1 upvote
Jan Privat

*lol* You get a gimbal system for less!
http://www.globe-flight.de/DJI-Zenmuse-H3-2D-GoPro-Kameragimbal-remotehead-brushless-Gimbal

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson

It looks cool. But ... it is too simple. Anyone can do this. They will have a hard time on the market.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
0MitchAG

Seems to have a lot of jerking in the 'stabilised' footage. I don't think this works better than what we've seen previously... it's really just a gopro counterweight.

4 upvotes
Total comments: 16
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