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5 Kickstarter projects for photographers

26

Snooperscope

Snooperscope promises to give your smartphone or tablet night vision. The external camera/lens attaches to the front of your device and delivers images to it via the Snooperscope app, which is available for both Android and iOS. 

Snooperscope puts out infrared radiation to illuminate objects shrouded in darkness, and it converts the reflected radiation into something you can see. Its developers even claim that can penetrate any opaque material that infrared rays can pass through, such as  liquids, inks and textiles. While Snooperscope may be limited in its practical photography applications, it could be fun to experiment with the ghostly X-ray-like results.

Quebee

Quebee is a tiny camera remote-controlled from your mobile device. You press a button to start recording and smartphone app serves as your dashboard, allowing you to capture video, timelapse or still images. The Quebee is capable of five hours of continuous full HD recording, or two days of recording in timelapse mode.

Quebees work better together, and developers are offering Quebee kits in both a two- and three-device version. Quebees' captures are uploaded to the cloud when the device is in range of a wi-fi network, and you’ll receive a notification on your phone when you're ready to start editing.

Michron: Timelapse for Everyone

Michron is an intervalometer to assist in timelapse captures with your DSLR. While geared toward DSLR photography, your phone plays an integral role as the tool for programing Michron’s settings via an app available for both Android and iOS. 

Michron is designed for both beginners and experienced photographers. You can set Michron to Auto, or delve into its more technical settings, finally compiling and editing your images into a timelapse video using the software of your choice.

The project has certainly piqued the interest of the Kickstarter community: with four days left in Michron's campaign it's already surpassed its original $40,000 goal by almost $130,000.

Foldio

Foldio is a portable studio aimed at, but not limited to, smartphone product photography. At 10.2x10.2x10.2 inches, Foldio looks ideal for lighting and shooting small items you’d normally sell on eBay or Etsy. 

The popup studio has an LED strip at the top that provides even lighting against a horizonless backdrop. Those backdrops come in seven colors: yellow, orange, green, purple, blue and pink. Foldio folds down into a flat package that’ll slip easily into a messenger bag or a backpack.

Wiggly

Wiggly is a modular three-axis stabilization device that aims to help iPhone shooters take the shake out of their videos. Control is limited to your wrist, a switch and a joystick. There are two iterations: a handheld unit for two-axis stabilization and a larger unit for one-axis stabilization.

Wiggly supports iPhones, GoPros and DSLRS under two pounds. We hope developers consider adding an Android version as well.

If your phone is your primary means of video creation, the Wiggly could prove beneficial, though $285+ seems like a bit of a tall order for anyone on a budget.

Comments

Total comments: 26
carmelmike
By carmelmike (4 months ago)

I would suggest people take a look at Palette, on Kickstarter. It's a cool-looking set of freeform controls for any program, and I'm looking forward to using it with CC...

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cchu/palette-a-freeform-interface-that-controls-any-sof

0 upvotes
ChrisAdv
By ChrisAdv (4 months ago)

funny the Snooperscope's video is super American, but then at the end with its website having a ".co.uk" makes it me crack up!

0 upvotes
remo1232
By remo1232 (4 months ago)

Yes OK, they want us to support. How can you support a product that is not even in the market?

0 upvotes
88SAL
By 88SAL (4 months ago)

By backing it with a contribution. If it is funded you get a reward based on your pledge. If you pledge the right amount, you usually get the product from the first production run.

0 upvotes
Roger Nordin
By Roger Nordin (4 months ago)

Open your wallet

1 upvote
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (4 months ago)

For "photographers"? Really? Do people who shoot with tablets deserve that name? What exactly is a "photographer" these days? Anyone who buys a smartphone?
Photographers - I mean *real* photographers - deserve more respect. Photography deserves more respect.

6 upvotes
SaShAsAsHa
By SaShAsAsHa (4 months ago)

Why can't a camera or tablet constitute someone a photographer? Are grainy or blurry photos from the early days of photography not really photos? Or those photographers not really photographers? I use pro equipment but it certainly doesn't make me a photographer. Anyone can shoot but not everyone can create something special. The tool is certainly not the qualifier. Welcome to 2013.

9 upvotes
88SAL
By 88SAL (4 months ago)

Photographers 100-150 years ago made the images they could with highly specialised equipment for the time. They did not have a device designed to do one thing with a side role of being another thing (I.e Phones with cameras built in). They didnt have a pocket watch that could create and album of photos, so please think about your comment sensibly.

Yes we are in 2013, yes if a Gumby wants to call themselves a photographer they can, its just a label. But the first time anyone shows up to a real paid job with just a phone or a tablet without clearing it first), Is going to most likely be sent home. If only for the sole reason that the job prpbably requires more than a 33mm fov.

2013 Changed what a photographer is called... Gave them a new form of compact camera and thats it.

3 upvotes
PatrickVienna
By PatrickVienna (4 months ago)

Yes yes, people shooting with tablets and iphones are photographers. And people with blue hats and water pistols are policemen. Welcome to your dreams!

1 upvote
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (4 months ago)

Patrick - exactly. And you buy a Lego kit and you're an architect! These days anyone armed with an iPhone feels entitled to call himself/herself a photographer. Yet they wouldn't recognize a good photograph (let alone make one) if it bit them on the leg.
As for the ones who like to reply with foolish remarks about us being in 2013, actually it's almost 2014 and they haven't grown any wiser. You know that old saying: Oh well...

2 upvotes
SaShAsAsHa
By SaShAsAsHa (4 months ago)

Having specialised cameras didn't make photographers of the past photographers it just meant they could afford an expensive piece of equipment. What of those in the ghetto without access to that equipment? Are they less inclined or able to capture a great shot with the right tools? Photography has now opened up to all people and not just the purists with their "chocolate box" or "calendar" perfect yet boring shots. I happen to see great natural ability in some phone photographers. Equipped with some pro gear and a bit of knowledge they could put many "pro" photographers to shame. Really photography is not rocket science, the technical aspects can be learned from a book but alas, you can't teach someone how to 'see'. Credit where credit is due I think.

2 upvotes
EricAotearoa
By EricAotearoa (4 months ago)

Actually, when you think about it, anyone who takes a photograph is a photographer, just like anyone driving a car is a motorist, and anyone riding a pushbike is a cyclist. In the days of film, there were pro photographers, amateur photographers, and snap shooters. Now days there's a plethora of titles covering the subject, naming just about every aspect and every mode of photography.

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
1 upvote
EricAotearoa
By EricAotearoa (4 months ago)

Forgot to add... Does a professional photographer using a mobile phone to take a photo mean he/she is not a 'photographer' in that instance? If a snap shooter takes an award winning photo with a mobile phone mean he/she can't be regarded as a photographer?

1 upvote
remo1232
By remo1232 (4 months ago)

SaShAsAsHa - Thanks for the closing comment. "you can't teach someone how to 'see'." In my opinion photography is about seeing the picture, before you can take it. If you can't see the picture, -regardless of the equipment you have- you can't take it. My 2,5 year old nephew can also press a shutter, but that does not make him a photographer.

1 upvote
JAZCAM
By JAZCAM (4 months ago)

We (real camera using photographers) have to laugh it off when working to get that payday shot and someone or many someones just stands up in front of us with a tablet or huge phone. Can't count how may times I've been working and all I see is a sea of tablet screens. It's out of control...

0 upvotes
facedodge
By facedodge (4 months ago)

I could see the product photo kit being great for Ebay based home businesses.

However, the pool of people making and selling bracelets on ebay is probably pretty small.

1 upvote
Dave Cruz
By Dave Cruz (4 months ago)

It's all crap. Hyping crap and selling it to dumb hipsters is how you get rich these days. Get with the program, man!

/sarc off

3 upvotes
88SAL
By 88SAL (4 months ago)

Sarc or no, the michron stands out

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (4 months ago)

That guy in the first shot has huge hands.

0 upvotes
stevens37y
By stevens37y (4 months ago)

Does it use accelerometers?

0 upvotes
MatrixClaw
By MatrixClaw (4 months ago)

Is there really that big of a demand for all this iPhone crap?

I mean, come on... iPhone product shots and stabilization kits?!?

5 upvotes
mrdancer
By mrdancer (4 months ago)

It's all about statistics. If there are 100 million iPhone users out there, and you can convince one-tenth of one percent to buy your product, you've just sold 10 thousand units. This is why every other product you see on the market touts iPhone - it's all sales and marketing.

1 upvote
skanter
By skanter (4 months ago)

Any photo accessory for a smartphone that costs more than 30 or 40 bucks is ridiculous. It's a cheap camera, and it's stupid to spend money trying to make it better.

1 upvote
Ocolon
By Ocolon (4 months ago)

@mrdancer

One tenth of one percent of 100 million is actually 100 thousand, making your argument even stronger.

0 upvotes
thescottfoster
By thescottfoster (4 months ago)

@skanter

I totally get your thinking, but the truth is that some people are using smartphone cameras as "serious" tools. There's people out there building careers using things like Instagram and Vine. It's not "photography" in the classical, technical, fine-art sense, but that doesn't mean people can't make serious work. It's not my taste, since I'd rather have a big sensor and well-made lenses, but I'm not going to tell somebody they're not allowed to use different tools.

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
EricAotearoa
By EricAotearoa (4 months ago)

A smart phone is a cheap camera? Really. In this part of the world, something like a Galaxy S4 costs $1100.00. An iPhone isn't that much cheaper. While a Canon EOS 100D costs less. A massive difference in the quality of resolution granted, but pricewise, top of the line smart phones ain't cheap.

1 upvote
Total comments: 26
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