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Connect smartphone reviews are written with the needs of photographers in mind. We focus on camera features, performance and image quality.

LG G2 Product Images
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Introduction

The G2 follows the Optimus G/G Pro as LG's flagship smartphone and the Korean manufacturer is hoping to significantly increase its market share in the Android smartphone world with the new device. Looking at the spec sheet, the chances for that happening are not too bad.

The G2 comes with Qualcomm's latest and greatest quad-core processor, the Snapdragon 800, 2GB RAM and a 3,000mAH battery that should go a long way toward powering the G2's headline feature: a huge 5.2-inch IPS LCD display. The G2's ultra-thin bezel means the device is still not any larger than its main competitors with 5-inch screens, like the Samsung Galaxy S4, HTC One or Sony Xperia Z1. In the camera department the G2 combines a 13MP CMOS sensor with an optical image stabilization system — a first on an Android device. 

In an attempt to differentiate the G2 further from the competition LG has also taken a slightly different approach toward device ergonomics and removed all buttons and keys from the edges of the phone. The G2's external controls are limited to a power button and +/- volume keys, all of which are located on the rear of the phone, just below the camera lens. The reasoning here is that when holding the phone in portrait orientation, this is precisely where your index finger naturally falls. 

Keep reading on the following pages to see how the G2's ergonomics work in real life and how it performs in the image quality department.

Key Photographic / Video Specifications

  • 13MP 1/3-inch CMOS sensor
  • F2.4 lens
  • Optical Image Stabilization
  • 1080p/60fps video

Other Specifications

  • 5.2-inch 1920 x 1080 IPS LCD display, 424ppi
  • 3,000mAH battery
  • Quad-core Snapdragon 800 chipset
  • Android 4.2.2
  • 2GB RAM
  • 16/32 GB internal storage with 2 GB RAM 

Our 11-page review

We've considered every aspect of the LG G2 camera, with the photographer in mind. We examined the user interface of the native camera app and its special features. We experimented with the camera's performance when taking stills and video, and had a play with the device's many special feature modes. Click any of the links below for more information of specific functions and continue to our conclusion for a final summary of our findings.

Comments

Total comments: 41
Noskism
By Noskism (3 months ago)

Could anybody help me? I am hesitant between LG G2 and Nexus 5. I am looking for the one with better camera. According to specifications, reviews, comparisons...the winner is clearly the G2, except in one test…When you go to the review pics, download any one and zoom. Personally, a pic with clouds in a clear blue sky is the best to see this kind of effect. You can see there are little, subtle black dots that give the images a “robotic” feeling. I believe my brother, who is a graphic designer, called "digital sharpening”, and it something they can digitally do with the images. He mentioned it should be a camera feature you can turn on and off. Can you do that? Can you turn it off? The images from the Nexus 5 are smooth with no black dots. For them it is easy manipulate a pic without that remove it from one with it already. Thank you, I would like to have my new phone before I go in vacation in 2 weeks.

0 upvotes
Tomofumi
By Tomofumi (7 months ago)

Just watching the focus shifting back and forth in video sample already turns off my desire to buy this phone...maybe some mods like CM11 can solve this problem?

0 upvotes
Pete Perry
By Pete Perry (8 months ago)

Maybe I'm missing something but, the 5s has a lot of noise even in Bright Images and when the light gets lower the image smearing NR makes the 5s Images very unflattering.

From the Samples, this phone's camera looks better to my eye.

Now, keep in mind that I don't have either phone and I'm really just evaluating them for my upgrade but... I don't share their enthusiasm for either the S4 or 5s.

0 upvotes
ag89
By ag89 (8 months ago)

I just recently switched from the htc evo 4g lte to the G2 maybe because im not used to switching the aetings on the camera everytime i want to take a picture but i think htc photos came out better

0 upvotes
tompabes2
By tompabes2 (8 months ago)

Very nice results, and regarding the statement that "the optical image stabilization system may produce "different motion blur effects while taking images on a tripod", well... even my Olympus XZ-10 manual says to turn off IOS when the camera is used on a tripod!

1 upvote
PDavis
By PDavis (8 months ago)

Did they really Just list as a con "very slow shutter speeds inevitably lead to motion blur in non-static scenes"? Really?

1 upvote
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (8 months ago)

yes, because we would prefer for Auto ISO to go a little higher and thus increase shutter speeds and avoid (some) motion blur.

1 upvote
jkrumm
By jkrumm (8 months ago)

What they need is something simple, like a a setting for motion that favors higher iso, and a setting for still subjects. You could choose one as a default.

0 upvotes
Doug Pardee
By Doug Pardee (8 months ago)

The Android specs provide for an "auto-ISO favoring higher ISO" setting. It's called HJR (hand jitter reduction). I don't know if the G2's libcamera.so module provides that or not.

Many Android camera apps don't give access to HJR even if the camera makes it available. Some that do (at least on my phone) include Snap Camera, PerfectShot, Camera360 Ultimate, and Vignette.

Of course, even if you've got HJR available, how well it works is up to the libcamera.so module that the phone or camera maker provided.

0 upvotes
TanningJ
By TanningJ (9 months ago)

nice...

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
technovice
By technovice (9 months ago)

Lars Rehm
I decided not to buy a phone with AMOLED screen after seeing how difficult they were to read in sunlight. I had the SG 2 and had wanted the SG 4. Every one said, " ...you need LCD to be able to see outside..." so have been looking at them. HTC One nice but poor camera, Sony Xperia 1, good but too big LG G2 seems to be the best spec wise but notice you said it is very difficult to see in sunlight. Why is this? Is it not better than SG 4? Which phones are better? Please help!

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (9 months ago)

I used the LG next to the Xperia Z1 and Lumia 1020 outside and found it be worse then both. Xperia was probably best, then Nokia, then LG. I guess you could just set the brightness higher, but that of course means your battery won't last as long (and indoors it is very nice and bright already.

0 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (9 months ago)

I found the Nokia 808 AMO LED screen to be very readable in direct sunlight. It does have the clear black display and RGB style AMOLED rather than pentile

0 upvotes
Pete Perry
By Pete Perry (8 months ago)

Here's how it works...

The iPS LCD Technology has a brighter image than the AMOLED Displays but, that's the limit to their benefit...

When compared, AMOLED has better black levels, dynamic range, contrast, and color saturation.

Neither has an advantage in color accuracy as both can be calibrated to be fairly accurate.

You do have an Edge in sunlight with iPS LCD but, AMOLED has the edge everywhere else.

0 upvotes
rfsIII
By rfsIII (9 months ago)

People like iPhone photos because they have a nice vivid color balance. On sociAl media no one can see the noise. It's a whole different mind space.

1 upvote
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (9 months ago)

yes it seems to be the trend for higher saturation, sharpness and contrast to how people perceive a "good" image from a "bad" image

0 upvotes
HarrieD7000
By HarrieD7000 (9 months ago)

Again an android gadget everyone wants and nobody uses because of the poor quality?

1 upvote
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (9 months ago)

Wouldn't call it poor quality, there are some better smartphone cams around but the G2 is not bad at all, it's also a nice phone if you want to use it to place a call or surf the web occasionally ;-)

4 upvotes
tompabes2
By tompabes2 (8 months ago)

Poor quality? Did you have a look at the G2 camera samples on the Internet?

Comment edited 9 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
guamy
By guamy (9 months ago)

I wish they make the back panel a mirror instead of just a plain nothing.

1 upvote
KariIceland
By KariIceland (9 months ago)

Selfihs and self obsessed much?

1 upvote
CyberAngel
By CyberAngel (9 months ago)

Yes you are!
Besides obvious make-up mirror there are other uses.

1 upvote
The Customer
By The Customer (9 months ago)

That would be nice. Very useful for using reflected light to signal a search crew, if you're lost in the woods. Also handy for checking if you've got any food particles on your face after eating!

1 upvote
chj
By chj (9 months ago)

Only thing I'm interested in is sports mode and it isn't even covered. Can I actually get fast shutter speed with this camera?

0 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (9 months ago)

yes, Sports Mode does the same as on virtually every other smartphone and increases the ISO for faster shutter speeds. Indoors it doesn't go any higher than 400 though which usually doesn't give you fast enough shutter speeds. Also, the wide-angle lenses of smartphones are usually not the best tools for any kind of sports photography.

2 upvotes
chj
By chj (9 months ago)

Thanks for the info. But you say "the same as ... virtually every other smartphone" as if this is a common feature. Do many smartphones have this? I don't think so. I know the iphone doesn't allow any control over ISO or shutter speed. This is the first time I've heard about any form of shutter speed control on a smartphone. Those that are well acquainted with all the available features on all available smartphones may think what sports mode does is obvious. But for me, shutter speed control is the number one priority. Corner sharpness, megapixels, etc. make very little difference when the entire photo is a blur. Exactly how sports mode works is important to some of your readers. Your reply provides very useful information. I'm not looking to capture blazing fast athletes, but the iphone really can't handle ANY motion in anything less than full sunlight. If ISO/shutter speed control is available on other smartphones, I'd be very interested, and it should be mentioned in reviews.

Comment edited 11 times, last edit 13 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (9 months ago)

you're right, the iPhone does not offer any control over shutter speed but most Android phones do. You can't set a shutter speed on any of them but you can usually set the ISO manually which of course (given they all have fixed apertures) changes the shutter speed. You just never know what exactly that shutter speed is when you shoot which is not ideal. But you could just set your phone to a certain ISO and then take picture and see if it's blurred. If yes, set a higher ISO. But again, any smartphone is a less than ideal tool for sports photography although many Android phones offer sports modes that are very similar to the G2's.

2 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (9 months ago)

haha, probably the correct thing to say is sports mode on just about every smart phone, except the iPhone ;)

0 upvotes
tompabes2
By tompabes2 (8 months ago)

@chj: if the iPhone doesn't have it, it's a feature and a good thing for ease of use and simplicity of the interface, while if an Android phone doesn't have it, well.. it's a con! That's the general rule! ;)

0 upvotes
Johnsonj
By Johnsonj (9 months ago)

Sweet! Life is good.

0 upvotes
Almeida
By Almeida (9 months ago)

"Focus Pumping"?

Don't you mean Focus Jumping? The error is all over the review...

0 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (9 months ago)

No that's what I call it, because the lens element is going back and forwards continuously, like the interior parts of a pump. I am pretty sure I've heard this expression used before. If not, I have just invented it :-)

5 upvotes
CyberAngel
By CyberAngel (9 months ago)

Focus Pumping. That's a major problem.
Otherwise I think you are too harsh unless you add that it's still better than a phone camera WITHOUT Optical Image Stabilization.

0 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (9 months ago)

I don't care if a phone has OIS or whatever other gizmo. What counts is the end results that you get when you press the shutter and there the G2 is not quite up with the best. However, as I've said before, it's by no means bad.

0 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (9 months ago)

I would call it "focus hunting", rather than focus pumping, but that is just my personal opinion.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (9 months ago)

Is does appear that iPhone 5s mid-ISO is as horrible as high ISO of the other 3 phones in the Studio Comparison low-light comparison.

5 upvotes
supeyugin1
By supeyugin1 (9 months ago)

iphone users don't care.

3 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (9 months ago)

Oh they gave up with the rubbish camera of iPhone?

4 upvotes
supeyugin1
By supeyugin1 (9 months ago)

No, they are still shooting with iPhone and thinking it's the best.

3 upvotes
KariIceland
By KariIceland (9 months ago)

Maybe because the iphone smudges its images like no other.

4 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (9 months ago)

yes but when used for social media sharing like facebook, twitter and the Instagram, quality is not so important as capturing the moment.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 41
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