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Flickr launches image marketplace initiative

37

Recently we have seen several photo sharing sites venture into the photo licensing and stock image business, for example 500px with its Prime program and EyeEm with its Marketplace and a cooperation with Getty Images. Getty itself updated its iOS apps in order to prepare itself better for the growing competition in the mobile stock photo market. 

However, long before smartphone images were accepted by stock agencies Yahoo-owned Flickr started its own cooperation with Getty via the Flickr Collection, allowing its members to monetize their images by offering them for licensing. Now it appears Flickr might be about to add another stock image solution to its portfolio. Today the site has announced the roll-out of a new licensing initiative called marketplace. Unfortunately, information provided on the Marketplace page is quite limited at this point and all users can do is sign up to receive updates once they become available. A blog post (from someone who appears to be a marketing representative of Flickr) doesn't provide any more detail.

However, we do know so far that Marketplace will be curated by a team within Flickr and allow participating members to have their images featured across Yahoo's own network of sites including Yahoo! News, Yahoo! Sports and Flickr itself. In addition images will be shared with bloggers, trade press and other media outlets including tumblr, the New York Times, Reuters, GIZMODO, Monocle and the BBC. According to the announcement, Marketplace will provide opportunities to license your work to photo editors, designers, and agencies including Getty Images.

All this sounds very vague at this point. There is no talk about licensing terms and conditions, fees, the submission and selection process or even a launch date. This makes it pretty much impossible to judge how attractive the new initiative will be to enthusiast and professional photographers and if it can be a viable alternative to the platforms listed above. It's clear though that image licensing seems to become an increasingly popular source of revenue for image sharing platforms of both the mobile and "traditional" kind. We'll keep an eye on the developments and will provide updates as new information becomes available.

Via: Techcrunch


Comments

Total comments: 37
JustaBhoy

I have been frozen out of my account for two months now, so if I can't get to my images Getty sure won't. Stick to getting the basics right Flickr.

0 upvotes
47872Mike

IF the terms are reasonable for the photographer, this could be a great initiative. Obviously, it's a big "if", but prospectively it offers a way out of the present situation in which users are hit on by small businesses and those producing their websites who are looking to pay peanuts to license them.

I like to use Flickr, and I don't mind getting commercial interest in my photos, but I'm not about to give them away or sell them for peanuts unless it's an exceptionally good cause, and I'm getting sick of people trying to take me for a ride.

1 upvote
Valterj

Getty Images doesn't respect photographers... just want money!

80% to Getty Images - 20% to photographers

2 upvotes
M Lammerse

True, but i got a lot of sales outside Getty Images due to Getty Images.

0 upvotes
Richard Murdey

How much money is there in selling photos, as opposed to being paid to take them? My net career total is 25 dollars, though Getty did contact me a couple of times to ask me to upload photos to their database...

0 upvotes
47872Mike

I think it's right to point out that being paid to take them usually pays a lot more, but there is every reason to remember that there IS still commercial interest in photos, and it is perpetuated by an on-going need. It's just a pity that rates can be so low...

0 upvotes
Michael Piziak

I see some Flickr dislikes in the comments. What other site allows uploads of the complete image, up to 1TB, without charging ?

1TB, that's virtually unlimited uploading.

0 upvotes
AstroStan

To date, Flickr has not seriously been monetized (e.g. advertising or pay-to-play). Maybe this is part of the beginning.

As for the link to other Yahoo apps and portals - many of them have opening photo/scenes. An obvious action would be to link those screens with Flickr photos. But don't expect to get paid if your photo is chosen. Although use of photos could be considered a type of payment for free use of the site (software, storage, etc. is not without cost and is not the birthright of any and every internet user).

Also, Yahoo is using Flickr for AI type experiments such as the recently announced (but not available) "scenic drive" app. It finds geo-tagged Flickr images on or near potential routes and uses them to algorithmically rate scenic value. Again, the use of such images can be considered as the price of all the "free" stuff.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Boerseuntjie

I use to contribute to the Flickr collection with Getty.
Getty has recently kill that venture with Flickr and all the contributors of that venture were migrated to Getty Images Moment. so your info is wrong there is no ventures between Flickr and Getty anymore.
Here is the official letter Getty send me and it clearly explains that they are no longer working with Flickr.

Today we are announcing that we provided notice to terminate our existing agreement with Flickr. Our original agreement reached its end, and while we continue to be open to working with Yahoo!/Flickr, we have not agreed to a new agreement at this time.

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
John De Bord Photography

OK I am intrigued! I want more details though about the terms and what not and royalty % before coming to a conclusion. I also think it's high time flickr starts partnering with some big time photo labs and allows photographers to actually sell prints through their site. The time has come. Enough with the "commercial" aspect BS. Even linking to your own website where you sell prints can get you in trouble on there. Stupid is as stupid does.

1 upvote
47872Mike

We have no details yet about the new scheme, but it did rather occour to me that Flickr would now be unlikely to try to sustain the ridiculous "no commercial activity" thing.

0 upvotes
maczp

Any time you start name dropping prestigious publishers, essentially playing the "exposure" card to the salivating, uncultured plebes, the tiny fraction of people who actually make some money off their photos will be paid in quarters. The only winner will be Flickr's bottom line.

0 upvotes
EssexAsh

Dear Flickr, just get a decent, usable app out there will you! something that lets us do everything you can do off the website.

1 upvote
D1N0

Getty lost!

2 upvotes
InTheMist

Skeptical!

I replied to the Getty invitation with "please go and *edit* yourselves."

0 upvotes
Horshack

Any time a purportedly free site launches a new "initiate" be sure to grab your wallet and don't let go.

3 upvotes
rowlandw

But flickr still sucks after their "upgrade" in May 2013. I abandoned it (5000+ images) and went over to 500px. If they had provided a "back to old flickr" button I would have stayed.

5 upvotes
Richard Murdey

I've been liking the layout recently, after they axed the sidebar idea and went back to the old "info underneath" format.

5 upvotes
Paul B Jones

Flickr's new new layout is pretty good. You might want to check it out.

2 upvotes
47872Mike

I rather like the new Flickr layout. I was very used to the old one and didn't enjoy the (protracted) changeover, but I think they have now been successful in their efforts to prioritise the images themselves.

0 upvotes
jtan163

Flickr has a new beta available (apparently to selected users). I have it it an like it.
It's close to a decent mix of the good bits of the old classic Flickr and the newer Flickr.

500px is OK, but I don't think it is significantly better than Flickr.

The quality of images overall is declining, as more people find it, but even as personal gallery I don't find it significantly better than current Flickr.

0 upvotes
photosecosse

There is now a revised version of Flickr which is the best yet, since late June. As for 500px, the admin couldn't organise a booze up in a brewery !

0 upvotes
rjx

Dear Flickr,

Why the hell are images so slow to load when looking at photostreams? If I browse 500px.com, their images load MUCH faster than Flickr's. I really wish Flickr would do whatever 500px is doing and make their site faster.

Comment edited 31 seconds after posting
1 upvote
JDThomas

I'm not sure if you realize this, but DPReview isn't flickr...

12 upvotes
quiquae

I have the exact opposite problem. Flickr usually loads instantaneously, whereas 500px.com is like watching paint dry. A big reason why I've ruled out switching. Maybe it has something to do with location of their servers relative to you?

1 upvote
47872Mike

It loads extremely quickly for me, unless they are having a server problem, which has happened a few times over the last year or two, and sometimes taken several days to sort out.

0 upvotes
rjx

JDThomas

Cute response.

0 upvotes
rjx

47872Mike

Ever since Flickr's first big change last year, the justified layout loads slowly for me. I constantly need to wait for images to load.

500px, on the other hand, has a similar looking layout yet their images load quickly for me.

It would be nice if Flickr could do whatever 500px is doing regarding loading times.

0 upvotes
michael2011

Dear Flickr,

Please fix your new thumbnail displays. It's horrendously slow to scroll and down right buggy at times. If you are not going to fix it, please give us an option to go back to the old ways of viewing.

7 upvotes
Deardorff

Anyone stupid enough to deal with Getty DESERVES the screwing they will get.

Getty does not value images or those who create them. "Content Provider" is what you are and you might discover your favorite images given away free or licensed for use for less than a dime.

Not to mention you get 40% or less of what they decide to license the image for.

Cheating photographers is their business model and they do it well, helped along by fools who ask to be screwed.

12 upvotes
JDThomas

Getty completely undermined the business as a whole.

8 upvotes
Potemkin_Photo

Yup. I remember when Getty tried to screw over Daniel Morel and the court forced Getty to pay up.

It's disgusting when a company that is in the very business it should be protecting by looking after the interests of all rights holders decides to act like the most blatant IP pirate.

I think sometimes it's much better that I'm not a professional photographer but rather a moneyed amateur. I don't depend on my gear to put food on the table and I don't have to deal with crap from the likes of flickr, getty, or any other company that seeks to get images for next to nothing while saying it would be good exposure for up and coming artists.

1 upvote
JDThomas

I shoot for Corbis and the money I make now compared to the money I made before Getty started selling web image for $3 is pathetic.

Back in the day I could count on my royalty checks to pay some bills. Now it's just a bit of extra cash. They also forced my rate down to 40%. I used to get 53%. I didn't feel so bad when I was making more than the company, even if it was only 3%.

But Getty just leveled the market. Especially since they own 80% of the other wire services.

1 upvote
NeilW

Potemkin_Photo has made reference to something which I think is part of the huge shift in this commercial sector.
The "Moneyed Amateur" is exactly that to the shooters, who recognise where they are in terms of skills and capability, but to the Gettys/Flickrs etc... they are conveniently indiscernible from a pro and manage their commercial relationships accordingly.

I also think this situation is now irreversible, unless the standards and volumes of images drop below an acceptable marketing/journalistic tolerance level.
It's in no-ones interest to allow that to happen, is it?

0 upvotes
Potemkin_Photo

I did and was honored to dabble in microstock when I was a beginner because I thought "wow, they want my stuff?" but haven't done anything of the like for many years now.

I don't know if photography professionals will see a winnowing of their ranks due to this recent market shift. Perhaps they'll become more like fine artists--many of whom carry a second job (or actually have a primary job with photography as their real passion).

Again, that might not be so bad. I can go out and buy an EF 50 1.2 because I "want to play around with it" rather than making practical choices about upgrading my equipment due to my clientele. If it doesn't work out, oh well. I'm the moneyed amateur with cash to spare.

0 upvotes
Potemkin_Photo

What I do notice is that pros are teaching alot more workshops and selling how-to videos in greater numbers to pad their take home income. That market will probably expand to serve the moneyed amateur. I've purchased a few videos from Ming Thein himself because I realize that I have not attained his level of skill but will like to get there.

0 upvotes
jtan163

I hate to say this, but professional photographers need to understand and deal with the issue that their craft, profession and/or art is no longer valuable because acceptable (not good, not great) but acceptable photos are now achievable by almost anyone.

It's like automobiles at the turn of the century, you no longer need to understand how an internal combustion engine or a steam engine works. It is no longer arcane.

And just as you no longer need an engineer to drive an automobile, you no longer need to be a pro to shoot an acceptable image.

In fact the commercial pressure possibly makes it harder to shoot a really beautiful optimal image as a pro.

I think there will of course still be pro shooters, just like there are paid drivers, but they will either be exceptional (racing drivers) or commodity (taxi/courier drivers).
The world has changed. Accept, adapt or die.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 37
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