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Sarah Jarrett takes top spot in Mobile Photography Awards

24
Sarah Jarrett is the Mobile Photography Awards Photographer/Artist of the Year.

The Mobile Photography Awards has announced its choice for Photographer/Artist of the Year as Sarah Jarrett. Jarrett is a UK-based artist and iPhoneographer who uses both an iPhone and iPad to create her painterly illustrations.

"We are absolutely thrilled to award such an original, talented and technically brilliant artist with our most prestigious prize," said Daniel Berman, founder of the annual awards. "Sarah’s work is truly remarkable in it’s own right and like all great artists, her chosen medium, an iPhone, is merely a tool she bends to serve her vision as an artist and photographer."

Sarah Jarrett is a UK-based artist and iPhoneographer who uses both an iPhone and iPad to create her painterly illustrations.

You can see more of Jarrett's work on the MPA website, and on her own website.

Helen Breznik was named runner-up for MPA Photographer/Artist of the Year, chosen from amongst the top 10 finalists in the annual awards. 

Helen Breznik was named runner-up for MPA Photographer/Artist of the Year.
Image by Helen Breznik

The MPA Grand Prize Jury includes Joanne Carter (publisher of mobile photography and art web resource The App Whisperer), Daria Polichetti (the co-founder of mobile photo and art community iPhoneart.com), Misho Baranovic (photographer and author of e-book iPhone Photography – How to Shoot, Edit and Share Great Photographs), Star Rush (the co-founder of Lys Photo Magazine and an instructor at the Cornish College of the Arts), Andy Royston (photographer, and a regular lecturer on mobile photography and art at the Museum of Discovery and Science in Ft. Lauderdale), Nettie Edwards (internationally recognized award-winning mobile photographer and artist) and Daniel Berman (filmmakerfine art photographer and Founder of the Mobile Photo Awards.)

The winners of 20 MPA categories were previously announced, including the DPReview Connect category, which invited participants to share images that conveyed what the word "connect" means to them. Souichi Furusho of Japan won the category with his image titled "Image Pic #51." 

Comments

Total comments: 24
Ak pinxit

Let aside the content of these images , they are so heavily filtered through software , that in my understanding too , it could not fall under "photography" art .
"Photography" is to freeze a moment of life , but freeze it on the single blink , and than - let it continue in it's flow...
These works flow nowhere . There are no dept of life moment in'em , just pictures , which once were sketches , taken by iPhone.

0 upvotes
wansai

I would not classify her as a photographer. She is a digital artist. the extent of her manipulation is well across the line between digital art and photography.

For example, if I do a mixed media panting with a picture I took as a base, I would not consider that to be photography nor the final output to be a photograph. It isn't. It clearly is a mixed media painting like the above is digital art/painting.

This is not to knock her work. I think it's brilliant! But it's clearly not photography.

Edited: to say that while many would scoff at classification; it does have its uses and can be important. Otherwise I could come to you and show you my photograph and say it's a painting. It isn't.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
waxwaine

So the question is:
What is the author trying to comunicate?
New differents hairstyles or something more deep?
What?

0 upvotes
chj

color and shape for the pure sake of visual fantasy,

0 upvotes
LTZ470

This takes Mushroom tea…and lots of it!

0 upvotes
haresh1983

very nice painting.

Comment edited 10 seconds after posting
1 upvote
stanic042

very nice work of art by her

0 upvotes
chj

They may be more painting than photography, but you know what? This takes more creative talent than photography alone.
...
Just checked her Flickr. She's amazing.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
3DSimmon

I think there is too much manipulation here for this to be called mobile photography, mobile art I feel is more fitting, but whatever. This is solid work though, impressive for being made on a mobile Device, well done Jarrett

1 upvote
mabasa

I see lots of smudges and distorted faces. Am I now supposed to say something pseudo-intellectual? Put meanings to the smudges? I could do that but I could do that also when staring at an empty canvas. At the moment I'm so bored with this thing called art. For me these photos/paintings look artsy. I don't see any reason to make them like those but just for the sake of it. Human face is such a powerful medium for conveying information. There should be a good reason to mess it up. So these photos/paintings should say something more but they don't, at least not for me. Sorry.

It looks more and more like mobile photography is a synonym for photo editing: how to strip reality from it with filters and such.

2 upvotes
Mishobaranovic

Actually pseudo-intellectual would have been preferable to your comment .

2 upvotes
mabasa

Why? When you make statements you are supposed to give reasons behind them to make them solid arguments, otherwise they have very little value.

I might have been a little harsh but to my defense those pictures are on public display. You send your pictures to the public contest to be judged and criticized. I think it's great that people express themselves and for example make these kinds of pictures. That's really great. But the context here is a photo contest. I actually came here now to clarify that my criticism should be seen more of a criticism of the jury's work.

1 upvote
Daniel K Berman

Yeah I agree with Misho - should have left a pseudo-intellectual comment instead of apologizing for not "getting" the work. You need to familiarize yourself with the mobile arts before offering this kind of "critique."

0 upvotes
Daniel K Berman

The context here is MPA Photographer/Artist of the year. Therefore, the jury considered work that falls into the categories of "photography" and what we might call "augmented" photography. We look for people who push boundaries and create compelling images - not specifically images that conform to "reality" or some kind of antiquated notion of "photography" - in any case photography is "writing with light" so to me these images are right in line with what the jury was to consider.

0 upvotes
mabasa

Yeah, English is not my fist language but I'm pretty sure that I made it clear that I wasn't apologizing anything. Being somewhat polite isn't the same thing. There is no getting it because there is little to get. Most of these pictures are quite empty. For example smudging the third portrait, her eye and hair. Does it say something more than just her expression already did? No, not really.

You can invent some meaning to it, of course, and that is where artsy pseudo-intellectual commenting comes into play. But I'm not into that.

It's quite funny that some people think you shouldn't give negative opinions on photos submitted to public contests. You didn't only disagree, which would have been fine, but instead you started this whole "you shouldn't criticize" thing.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 13 minutes after posting
1 upvote
mabasa

"You need to familiarize yourself with the mobile arts before offering this kind of "critique.""

The quotation marks are the icing :D Yeah. That must be it. Even though you don't have any clue about my knowledge of the genre. I'm not even going to get into your thinking that there should be.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Daniel K Berman

Actually, you pretty much apologized. I quote "...these photos/paintings should say something more but they don't, at least not for me. Sorry" - like I said above, there's no need to apologize. And let's get real about the difference between a critique and just saying you don't like something (which is fine, of course but it doesn't constitute critique.)

Anyway, enough said. You've made your point, you apologized for the work not speaking to you and now we can all move on to taking pictures, looking at art and learning how to formulate criticism.

0 upvotes
Dédéjr

Ok Why not but all showed here is paintings. I am not seeing the photography.

4 upvotes
Daniel K Berman
4 upvotes
Dédéjr

Sigh if you like but this site is showing only paintings by her. It may have started out as photographs but it is not anymore. So i ask why has she won a photography award and why is she promoted here. I hope you can enlighten me.

0 upvotes
Daniel K Berman

She has been named as the MPA Photographer/Artist of the Year. Paintings are made with paint. The mobile arts have room for photography, digital art, visual art, etc...in many ways the blending of the genres defines the new medium. I don't see any paintings here but I do see what I would call photography augmented by digital creativity. Thanks.

1 upvote
jcmarfilph

Come to think of it, she had used a crappy iPhone and still won the competition. It must be her talent and not the medium.

3 upvotes
Dédéjr

No idea why, only the judges know. But this whilst interesting to some, is not my myself and i's definition of photography.

0 upvotes
Daniel K Berman

Sarah Jarrett is a budding superstar in the world of the mobile arts - her chosen tool is an iPhone but her talent is universal. Amazing work Sarah and congrats! Well deserved.

1 upvote
Total comments: 24
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