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Oppo Find 7 features QHD display and 50MP images

61

Several manufacturers were rumored to launch a smartphone with a QHD-display (2560x1440 pixels) at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona but none of the models introduced at the show featured one of the high-resolution screens. Now the wait is over. The Chinese smartphone manufacturer Oppo has introduced their latest flagship model, the Find 7. This makes the Find 7 the first smartphone to feature a QHD screen. The pixel density of the 5.5-inch display is a staggering 538ppi which should make for ultra-sharp rendering of images and text.

Not only is the Find 7's screen top-notch, the new device comes with top-end specifications all around. The Android OS is powered by a Snapdragon 801 SoC and 3GB RAM. Rapid Charge technology will let you charge the Find 7's 3000mAh battery to 75% in only 30 minutes and a MicroSD slot allows for easy storage expansion.

The Camera

With a 13MP 1/3.06-inch Sony Exmor CMOS sensor and F2.0 aperture, the camera specifications look decent, but not anything out of the ordinary. The Find 7 also comes with a "Super Zoom" software feature that allows for the capture of 50MP images. To achieve this the camera takes a burst of 10 images, then selects the four best shots and combines them into a single 50MP frame. Brief communication with Oppo indicates they are using a 'superposition' technique to create the 50MP file. We surmise the underlying principle is similar to that used by the Hasselblad H4D-200MS to create 200MP images from a 50MP sensor (note the similar 4x increase in resolution over the native sensor resolution). Such super-resolution techniques create a higher-than-native resolution image by relying on small movements from shot-to-shot to allow for high frequency detail - beyond what the sensor could natively represent accurately - to be recovered. For example, consider the following example where the sensor (indicated by the pixels outlined in red) is imaging black lines with widths on par with pixel widths. 

An illustrative example of a sensor's pixel grid (pixels outlined in red) recording high frequency detail on par with the sensor's frequency. The color (albeit black, white, or grey here) recorded at any pixel is shown within each pixel. Graphic: Photo Acute

Depending on the alignment of the sensor to these alternating black and white lines, the sensor may (left, in the image above) or may not (right, in the image above) accurately represent the original pattern. Remember: a pixel just tallies up the amount of light entering it, and on the right, any pixel is just recording 50% white and 50% black - that is, grey. This loss of contrast - resulting from the pattern being averaged across pixels - results in a decrease in resolving ability of high frequency detail. Now imagine shifting the sensor such that the pixels on the right were to align with the pattern just as the pixels on the left initially did in the example above. This might allow for the recovery of additional detail. Sophisticated software algorithms can 'look' for this sort of detail across multiple shots to increase the effective resolution of capture. Oddly enough, the small movements your hands make from shot-to-shot - which you might initially imagine as deleterious - end up potentially increasing the spatial resolution of the sensor. Simply by allowing for many different alignments of the sensor's pixel grid to the real-world detail being projected onto it. You can read more about the basic principles of super-resolution and how it is used to recover sub-pixel information in Photo Acute software here.

We do note that for this method to be effective, the lower 'native' resolution images need to be aligned with sub-pixel precision. However, with faster processors as well as accelerometer information regarding shot-to-shot movements, we imagine this is not too large an issue with modern hardware.

The 50MP Image - Any Good?

While Engadget shows a sample that does not look too impressive at 100% view and has the appearance of an upsampled file, the technique might have its merits in a phone for creating a better, native 13MP resolution file (downsampled from the 50MP file). Although Oppo confirmed that a lower, 'native' resolution output using their "Super Zoom" technology would not be available (single shot 13MP - including RAW - output is still available), users can always downsample the 50MP file to 13MP in any photo-editing suite themselves. Furthermore, any multi-shot technique has the potential to reduce noise - especially important for the small sensors found in phones.

All that said, given the feature's "Super Zoom" moniker we would expect the large images to, at the very least, be used for a more efficient digital zoom. It'll be interesting to see how it compares to Nokia's PureView and more conventional systems once more samples are available.

The Oppo Find 7 is the first smartphone with a QHD screen.
The camera module comes with a 13MP Sony sensor and a F2.0 aperture.


Further Details

In addition the Oppo Find 7 is also the first Android device to offer Raw capture. In video mode you can capture 4K footage and 120 fps slow motion video at 720p resolution. For self-portraits and video-calls there is a 5MP F2.0 front camera.

The Find 7 is also available as a version with 1080p display that comes with a slightly downgraded CPU, 2GB RAM and less onboard-storage, but the camera specification is identical to the QHD-model. The latter will retail at 3,498 CNY (approximately $565), while the version with 1080p-screen will set you back 2998 CNY (approximately $480). There is no word yet on availability outside of China.

Key-specifications:

  • Snapdragon 801 SoC
  • 3GB RAM (1080p version: 2GB)
  • 5.5-inch QHD (2560 x 1440 pixels) display, 538ppi (1080p version available, too)
  • 32GB storage and MicroSD support (1080p version: 16GB)
  • 13MP 1/3.06-inch Sony Exmor IMX214 sensor
  • F2.0 lens
  • 5MP F2.0 front camera
  • Raw capture
  • 4K video
  • 720p 120 fps slow motion
  • 3000mAh battery (1080p version: 2800mAh)

Source: Oppo 


  

Comments

Total comments: 61
halc
By halc (4 months ago)

50 down-sampled with a divisor of 9 (3*3) will give each resulting pixel a below average noise of 3*3 pixels.

And give a 5.5 Mpix image, more than enough for most.

The only thing this baby needs is a cam software that does this in background, after each shot, so you save post-processing.

And with selectable curves/settings for low ISO high brightness, HDR scenes and high iso / low light scenes.

In addition to all that, it has the best screen, best SoC, best amount of RAM, best battery capacity (sans phablets) and 32GB memory model available (shame on you Sony and Samsung for your 16GB on-board flash memory variants only).

0 upvotes
Sirandar
By Sirandar (4 months ago)

DPreview ... please do a review on this camera with respect to shot times and quality.

This is old tech but it works, I used to use PC version of Registax and it worked well.

If the 10 shots are quick enough this may work well.

It is a lie to say this is 50mp, that is almost fraudulent

0 upvotes
Daryl Cheshire
By Daryl Cheshire (4 months ago)

I already have a smartphone in which I don't use the camera but use a 'real' camera.
I'm interested in the camera but don't need another phone.
It does allow the telcos to be part of the distribution but can I get one without having a phone plan?
If I want to use the Nokia 1020 or some advanced imaging device I buy a phone I don't use or make yet another switch to another phone plan.
But an advanced imaging device can be connected to some communications system or use WiFi.
I'm thinking, will there be small computers carried by people which will handle imaging and communications and avoid the need to cram it all in one device.
The Google modular phone seems to be a step in this direction where camera modules are swapped on a chassis which has a phone and so on.

0 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (4 months ago)

I had applications that could do that back with the VGA camera of the Nokia 6600, quite some time ago...

Plus, if you want to do that now with your current phone, you can do it on your pc, with its full processing power.
Just download Registax...

Comment edited 51 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (4 months ago)

That's a good point, LensBeginner. You're absolutely right - to a certain degree these sorts of tricks can already be done manually in post-processing (especially if the RAW data is available).

But that doesn't take away from the fact that having an app - a native one particularly - that does it well is relevant to the end-user. Furthermore, I do wonder if accelerometer data from the phone could speed up the alignment process.

And re: older devices that did this - some older videocameras utilized pixel-shift CCDs to create greater-than-SD content back in the day. As Sirander indicates above, it's old tech, but it (sometimes) works. Rather well too, might I add - especially if you subsequently downsize to the native resolution (you'll notice MTF & SNR increases).

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Andrew Butterfield
By Andrew Butterfield (4 months ago)

When will they develop humans that can see these extra pixels?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (4 months ago)

They already exist, if you crop...

1 upvote
RichRMA
By RichRMA (4 months ago)

More than one camera has the ability to combine images to produce higher megapixel counts, or HDR, whatever. The problem is that any movement in the scene while the exposures are taken, that is resolvable by the sensor will result in blur, negating any image gain the extra pixels would provide in the area that moved.
I will add that Oppo makes excellent Blu-ray players.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (4 months ago)

Just to be clear: super-resolution is completely different from HDR. The latter deals with circumventing the limited range of brightnesses the sensor can record, while the former is an attempt to increase resolved detail.

Yes, moving objects may not see as much gain in quality (if any at all), but for the many of us that shoot more static scenes with smartphones, the potential gain may be significant. We really won't know until we've got one in our hands to test.

Good point about Oppo Blu-Ray players. It's funny when you consider Oppo's players had very good DVD upscaling algorithms :)

Comment edited 27 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (4 months ago)

We got that, however the goal is similar.
The point of "more Megapixels", or "more exposures", is that you can use the surplus data (using the proper procedure e.g. exposure bracketing, focus bracketing, etc.) to increase either detail (super resolution), DR (HDR), SNR (supersampling) or DoF (focus stacking). An maybe even some other thing that I missed.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (4 months ago)

Ah, I see the OP was simply commenting on multiple-image techniques. My 'clarification' was unnecessary, apologies.

0 upvotes
tommy leong
By tommy leong (4 months ago)

Find 7
Ominous name for a phone , sounds like it will get lost easily !
haahaha

3 upvotes
sportyaccordy
By sportyaccordy (4 months ago)

Id rather just have multiple camera sensors. How quickly does this take the burst? The function is pretty much limited to static scenes/subjects.

Give us arrays!!!!

0 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (4 months ago)

Moving objects in the scene may be problematic, but a clever algorithm can attempt to grab a moving subject from only one of the shots for the final image.

1 upvote
FRANCISCO ARAGAO
By FRANCISCO ARAGAO (4 months ago)

With this design this phone looks more like an ersatz of Sony Xperia.

0 upvotes
Combatmedic870
By Combatmedic870 (4 months ago)

Its design looks great. BTW I also love the Z2 design as well.

0 upvotes
JWest
By JWest (4 months ago)

How come they can cram 2560 x 1440 affordably into a phone, when I can't get my hands on a decent quality monitor any bigger then 1920 x 1080 without spending a small fortune?

2 upvotes
thx1138
By thx1138 (4 months ago)

Because it would almost impossible to scale this pixel density up to a much larger device and not have huge issues with dead pixels etc. It's like in the early days of digital when Canon released 1Ds, the yields from a FF sensor were dramatically lower than crop sensor with as much as 50% failure rate and hence the high cost.

Now of course you failed to mention we have just seen the release of 4K monitors @ 24" size that are reasonably affordable, but these are still only about 200dpi. 531dpi would be higher than even 8K. We will see this happen but not for many many years at an affordable price point.

2 upvotes
JWest
By JWest (4 months ago)

And you failed to mention that these "reasonably affordable" 4K monitors are all TN panels and thus pretty worthless for serious work.

0 upvotes
Rage Joe
By Rage Joe (4 months ago)

Those pictures on Engadget looked really bad. :(

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (4 months ago)

"Those pictures on Engadget looked really bad. :("

That doesn't necessarily mean the handset is cr@ppy. Their 808 shots were also sub-par and useless for properly evaluating the camera.

0 upvotes
EricCul
By EricCul (4 months ago)

This resolution is for marketing and boasting purposes only. Gullible customers will think that the higher number means better. Ignorant shop assistants will tell them that too.

In reality, if a screen has already reached a pixel density that is at the limits of what the human eye can discern, then you are making screens for eagles after that ;-)

These silly resolution screens have no benefit, but some downsides, not least their extra battery/power and processor requirements.

As for the 50MP camera sensor? There is no point in that either if it doesn't produce a better image. 50 sounds better than 24 to the gullible customer.

But the benefit is negated by the amount of space required to store those mammoth files and the amount of power used for the higher number of photocells.

If you really want an image of that quality, get a camera that can produce that quality. Most images I have seen from the very high resolution phone cameras are mud (to put it politely).

4 upvotes
Zeisschen
By Zeisschen (4 months ago)

that's basically why Samsung is so successful. Big numbers and marketing

1 upvote
rndman
By rndman (4 months ago)

Yeah. on 5.5 inch display you can not make out a difference between 720P vs 1080P let alone QHD...
I don't understand it...

3 upvotes
michael_alabama
By michael_alabama (4 months ago)

come nearer. nearer, nearer.....stop: Now you have it (if you are shotsighted only)

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (4 months ago)

Easy. Use a microscope.

0 upvotes
Combatmedic870
By Combatmedic870 (4 months ago)

On a 5.5 inch phone, you can seen the difference between a 720 vs 1080. Compare the note 2 vs the note 3. There IS a difference.

0 upvotes
saurav ranjan
By saurav ranjan (4 months ago)

I hope canon and nikon think somthing on these lines...
4k DSLR would be the next big thing...

1 upvote
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (4 months ago)

Quad HD vs 1080p displays: closeup comparison :
http://www.androidauthority.com/quad-hd-vs-1080p-comparison-359430/

Samples of the Oppo Find 7′s impressive 50MP images :
http://www.androidauthority.com/oppo-find-7-50mp-camera-samples-359680/

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (4 months ago)

yes macros of LCDs are SUPER applicable to real life

2 upvotes
EricCul
By EricCul (4 months ago)

The only thing impressive about that is that they can always get people to go along with it.

1 upvote
Wes Syposz
By Wes Syposz (4 months ago)

maybe should read oops?

2 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (4 months ago)

Why ?

0 upvotes
duartix
By duartix (4 months ago)

Good!
Finally some good use for HundreadaCores!

0 upvotes
dzukela
By dzukela (4 months ago)

What is Oppo? Bulgarian weapon factory?

1 upvote
CJ100570
By CJ100570 (4 months ago)

It kinda, sorta takes 50MP pictures....

1 upvote
duartix
By duartix (4 months ago)

Well, it stacks much faster than my i7@3.2Ghz.
If that's not an achievement, I don't know what is...

0 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (4 months ago)

...maybe it also stacks much crappier? ;-)

1 upvote
gerard boulanger
By gerard boulanger (4 months ago)

Another step to eliminate the P&S cameras

3 upvotes
Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul
By Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul (4 months ago)

Do you know the focal length & optical zoom?

0 upvotes
Sirandar
By Sirandar (4 months ago)

Has most of everything I want, on paper at least .... I wonder if NA carriers will ever have it.

About the pixel density. IMO a higher pixel density has no perceivable advantage when zooming into a picture or web page ..... it all comes down to whether you can see the pixels or not.

Actually, the reverse is true .... a higher pixel density will let you read smaller text easily unzoomed .... to a limit. I would guess Apple has already reached that limit with Retina.

But a higher pixel density could be valuable if a magnifying pair of glasses were included with the phone. It would still be impossible to use the touchscreen as your finger would be too large.

0 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (4 months ago)

You can order directly from oppostyle.com. Oppo ships internationally and both model of this phone support LTE

0 upvotes
3dreal
By 3dreal (4 months ago)

It will not be a s sharp as sigmas dp2 quattro.

0 upvotes
Chris2210
By Chris2210 (4 months ago)

Screen resolution. Can someone explain to me the advantage of 586 ppi on a smartphone over one that's around, say 300ppi?

I am very near-sighted so occasionally, without corrective lenses I will hold my phone screen within several inches of my eyes. Even at that range I cannot discern individual pixels. What is the use of more resolution if the limitations of 'perfect' human vision means one is unable to perceive it? On a tiny screen is a 1080p film perceptually any better than 720p? I think not.

The numbers game in screen resolution terms is getting increasingly ridiculous as it goes increasingly beyond the useful. And it isn't as if there isn't a price to pay in terms of battery drain.

4 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (4 months ago)

> Can someone explain to me the advantage of 586 ppi on a smartphone over one that's around, say 300ppi

Marketing bullet point probably, I can't see individual pixels on my 440ppi phone without a magnifying glass so any more than that shouldn't make any difference.

3 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (4 months ago)

we'll have to wait and see what the screen actually looks like when we got one into our hands. One advantage to me is that you simply get more content on the screen, for example in a browser. You get a good overview over a website and then can zoom in to actually read it, at least that's the way I browse the web on my phone. That said, it already works pretty well with the current 1080p screens, not sure how much of an advantage the QHD screen will be, it's got more pixels than many computer screens.

0 upvotes
Alphoid
By Alphoid (4 months ago)

Whenever screen resolutions have gone up, I could see smaller text and images were sharper. I've only seen computers up to QHD, and cells up to 1080p, so it's possible QHD on a cell goes beyond the limits of reasonable, but I'll hold off judgement until I see it. So far, it's always helped.

4 upvotes
Marcelobtp
By Marcelobtp (4 months ago)

More colors, better contrast, more 3d like immersive image.
To me theres a great diference in sharpness from galaxy note 1 800p to 1080p. But i guess the proposition is not only to increase the detail per si but to allow this other characteristcs to evolve too. Some say 8k is the maximum perceived resolution by the eye, but i guess the world is not rendered in 8k. it is? So they will keep going, and great numbers sell more to people with no knowlege. But yeah choose what satisfy you if you dont see any diference don t buy it. :)

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (4 months ago)

Why do you think everybody has poor vision like yourself? Also, using video as a standard is wrong.. unless you are viewing a direct BluRay rip, the quality of the video file is going to be the limiting factor, not the screen.. this doesnt mean you will not see differences in other things like photos.

1 upvote
EricCul
By EricCul (4 months ago)

@Jogger, there is a medical facility somewhere that wants to examine your eyes. They are not human, if you can discern that kind of resolution without a magnifying glass or microscope.

1 upvote
Couscousdelight
By Couscousdelight (4 months ago)

The 50mpxl images are very soft :
http://image-sensors-world.blogspot.fr/2014/03/oppo-smartphone-snaps-50mp-pictures.html

3 upvotes
peterwr
By peterwr (4 months ago)

"With a 13MP *1/3.06-inch* Sony Exmor CMOS sensor..."

FFS. When are camera manufacturers going to start quoting sensor sizes in millimetres? This 1/x.x business is needlessly confusing. OK, so maybe that's the point - big numbers sound more impressive to the inexperienced, even if they have a 1 over them - but still, millimetres (or even millimeters) would make imaging chips a lot easier to compare. It would make it easier to estimate the 35mm equivalent focal length of the lenses, too.

C'mon DPReview - how about you start doing it unilaterally? You're influential enough that maybe you could change industry policy.

10 upvotes
Johan Borg
By Johan Borg (4 months ago)

Or just write the crop factor as one would with a larger sensor, in this case 7.4 - in other words roughly 2% of the sensor surface and resulting image quality of a full frame camera.

1 upvote
Shadowww
By Shadowww (4 months ago)

http://i.imgur.com/UnScnBZ.png
I wonder how much I'd have to resize this image to fit non-1" (Nokia 808/1080) cameraphones here..

0 upvotes
Henrik Herranen
By Henrik Herranen (4 months ago)

Shadowww: The image was very confusing until I saw the error in it. The yellow line is supposedly "Sigma 24-70 f/2", but the line goes from 70 to 200 mm along the f/2.8 line. The legend for the purple line says generic 70-200 f/2.8, but the line itself goes from 24 to 70 mm along the f/2 line.

Comment edited 55 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Shadowww
By Shadowww (4 months ago)

Henrik: I mixed up the colors, sorry. Will fix it before posting anywhere again

0 upvotes
Vladik
By Vladik (4 months ago)

Whats real funny, is that we dont even have a full frame sensor with that many pixels. I dont understand the point of this crap. They never perfect 8 mp sensor and went pretty much straight to 40-50. My lumia 1520 20mp cam is crap. that must be a lot worse.

1 upvote
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (4 months ago)

It's a 13MP sensor, the 50MP is achieved through a software feature.

1 upvote
arhmatic
By arhmatic (4 months ago)

I've been saying this for years!
Millimeters!

1 upvote
peterwr
By peterwr (4 months ago)

Hi Lars - how come DPR *doesn't* quote sensor sizes in millimetres? It would make comparisons - which is what the site is all about, after all - a lot easier.

1 upvote
jnrob
By jnrob (4 months ago)

I can see this technique would increase color resolution, since due to movement you could have different color pixels overlap, thus compensating for bayer demosaicing losses.
I am also wondering if Fuji will make a phone sensor with small and large pixels, let's say 8M+8M, thus increasing low light performance and DR without multiple frames. Small pixels could also be used to increase resolution with multiple frame techniques too. Any opinions on this?

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Total comments: 61
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