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Check out the first images from the iPhone 5S

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It's the moment that iPhone photographers have been waiting for:  Apple has released photos taken on its brand-new iPhone 5S. The more high-end device that Apple released today has bigger pixels on a sensor with a 15 percent larger active area and a 1/3EV brighter lens. Combined, these features should help capture more light and therefore (hopefully) take better photos than the phone's predecessor. 

The iPhone 5S camera measures in at 8 megapixels, with an f/2.2 aperture lens. New features enabled by the phone's A7 processor include slow motion video, burst mode, improved image stabilization and better auto focusing. 

Here is some of the EXIF data we pulled from the flower photo (top).

Make:   Apple
Model:   iPhone 5S
Date Time:   8/6/2013 - 3:11 PM
 Shutter Speed: 1/2740 sec 
 F-Stop: f/2.2 
 ISO Speed Ratings: 32 
 Focal Length 4.1 mm  
 Pixel Dimension X:  3264
 Pixel Dimension Y:  2448

Of course we will share our own real world image samples as soon as we begin our review of the iPhone 5S, but until then, here's a few more sample images from Apple. (Click to view full-resolution.)

Comments

Total comments: 71
lightmagic
By lightmagic (Sep 24, 2013)

Amazing for an iphone. Who need D4, D800e?

0 upvotes
David Dolsen
By David Dolsen (Sep 13, 2013)

You guys are hilarious. It's a cell phone with a camera in it. I see comments here like it should measure up to a D4 or a 1D. Enjoy it for what it is. As for the pixel count, try to remember that in a camera, the size of the pixel is a large measure of the quality you will get. My D800 has 36 megs while the D4 has 16 megs. The pixels in the D4 are approximately twice as big as in the D800. The difference in image quality is phenomenal. The D4 wins, period. My mistake....

2 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Sep 23, 2013)

> The difference in image quality is phenomenal. The D4 wins, period.

Not true at all. Have a look at DxOMark to see the D800 as the best all-around performing sensor of any camera. Better DR, Color Depth, and similar high ISO ability as the D4 makes the D800 and D800E the best performing DSLR for IQ currently available.

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Cameras/Camera-Sensor-Ratings

And this comparison has relevance as to why the Lumia 1020 look better than iPhone images.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Phillip U
By Phillip U (Sep 12, 2013)

Image quality is fair as expected. The amount of space dedicated for the camera in an iPhone is so small it's a marvel it can even take photos. Most of the work seems to be done in the CPU and software rather than by using high quality optics and sensors. That's a shame considering how popular iPhones are.

Apple and Samsung are truly in a position to blow away the competition by including high quality camera parts but they both seem to be only including "good enough" technology in their flagship phones. Sure Samsung has been experimenting with their Galaxy cameras, but even they know that the average user isn't going to lug something that large around as a phone.

0 upvotes
Phillip U
By Phillip U (Sep 12, 2013)

Why aren't we seeing folded-optics zoom lenses with OIS in a fairly compact device? Or how about much bigger sensors? 8MP is fine for me, but look at the noise on these tiny sensors! Even Sony's new flagship Xperia Z1 has such obvious softness and noise at low ISO. These limitations are what make us avid photographers carry a second camera. I wish I could get away with just my iPhone. And I've tried. But I always end up disappointed and wishing I had brought my SLR or even my wife's point and shoot. Don't get me wrong, I'm no pixel peeper, but these limitations show up on my prints and my shared photos because I'm forced to crop due to lack of telephoto and the tiny sensors have poor dynamic range with blown highlights or featureless shadows.

0 upvotes
David Julian
By David Julian (Sep 12, 2013)

I have been an iPhone'er since day one....
but after leading SmartPhonography workshops on both platforms, the Androids all do a way better job with highlights, especially clipping in directly-lit shiny objects, brightly-lit faces, sunsets, etc. — the stuff most people seem to shoot. No software tweaks and replace fried highlights.

I doubt the newest iPhone 5s will overcome that as well as hoped, but I am optimistically cautiously crossing all digits and.... my iPhone 5s is on pre-order. My partner will get a new Droid. We shall shoot it out!

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Sep 12, 2013)

"but after leading SmartPhonography workshops on both platforms, the Androids all do a way better job with highlights, especially clipping in directly-lit shiny objects, brightly-lit faces, sunsets, etc. — the stuff most people seem to shoot. No software tweaks and replace fried highlights."

While I'm in no way an Apple fanboy, can you elaborate on this more? Which Android handset produces way less highlight clipping than the 5S? The GS4? Some Sony Xperia models?

Generally, I find the IQ of my iPhone 5 acceptable for a non-OIS phone.

0 upvotes
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 11, 2013)

I will agree with someone from the commentators below that some photos have nice bokeh !!

0 upvotes
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 12, 2013)

skeptical steve

0 upvotes
riknash
By riknash (Sep 11, 2013)

Sample photos are quite okay for an 8MP camera. There will be zillions of photos taken with this camera er, ah, phone. Maybe not a lot of innovation with this model but the camera will prove to be very useful as Apple has tried to improve the photo capabilities in the areas where it is needed. The samples really don't illustrate the more demanding situations the camera will find itself to be in such as low light restaurants and similarly poor lighting conditions.

1 upvote
Vladik
By Vladik (Sep 11, 2013)

Doesn't jelly fish scene demonstrate a demanding situation ?

2 upvotes
Skeptical Steve
By Skeptical Steve (Sep 12, 2013)

You don't think the sunset shot, image 4, is a demanding one? It's directly into the sun and yet it isn't lost in lens flare; and the focus and exposure are correct for the foreground rather than for the thermonuclear light in the centre.

Actually I'd attribute that to the ability of iPhones to set focus and exposure via the phone's touch screen. Contrary to some contributors to this thread, manual exposure override on the iPhone is never more than a touch away, even for 'difficult' subjects like this one.

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Sep 12, 2013)

Huh? Any camera can set focus and exposure to any part of the scene so what is especial about that? These are all conservative shots so let's see if this phone will do at least mediocre (common for all camera phones except with Pureview) in high ISO.

1 upvote
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (Sep 11, 2013)

Latest and greatest of Nokia, doesn't impress much with very slow shot to shot times.
What I don't like is Apple being conservative with the camera hardware and other parts, which I think they are saving for the next iPhone soon.

0 upvotes
Vladik
By Vladik (Sep 11, 2013)

The processor looks pretty impressive on 5S, even though iPhone 5 was already super fast. What I found really stupid is that their so called "budget" iPhone is no budget at all. I don't know since when $550 became chump's change! I was hoping it would be TOPS 400. I have no idea how they will penetrate low end markets, that go for phones 200 and below.

1 upvote
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (Sep 11, 2013)

I've heard they're going to upgrade the display with something bigger and more resolution, and surprising upgrades. I like the upgraded flash of the 5s, nothing has done it before.

I almost missed that 5C pricing, with a plastic case and a not so latest hardware. I think Apple does not want people buying the cheaper one, pricing it so close to the flagship phone.

0 upvotes
Phillip U
By Phillip U (Sep 12, 2013)

@Vladik - I think perhaps you have fallen for the iPhone rumormongers who all claimed to know that there would be a new, low-cost iPhone. At no point did Apple ever allude to that actually being the case.

In fact, quite the opposite occurred. Apple execs have been quoted as saying that they were essentially uninterested in producing a device that catered to budget markets. Phil Schiller earlier this year said "Despite the popularity of cheap smartphones, this will never be the future of Apple’s products. In fact, although Apple’s market share of smartphones is just about 20 percent, we own the 75 percent of the profit."

So don't blame Apple. They're not interested in selling a budget item. They're solidly in the luxury market and that's where they're staying.

Comment edited 13 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Skeptical Steve
By Skeptical Steve (Sep 11, 2013)

Pictures 1 and 4: nice bokeh.

1 upvote
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 12, 2013)

Yes the bokeh looks great, despite some obvious noise in some others.

0 upvotes
David Cheok Photography
By David Cheok Photography (Sep 11, 2013)

All things considered. The images are impressive for a phone that has components in total that costs less than a fraction of the stuff i use. 8 MP is as good as my old 1dmk2 that has produced images printed up to 12x18 and the phone produces much cleaner images than that sensor. Its not a 5d2/3 sensor but its good enough for its purpose.

2 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Sep 11, 2013)

Really a crappy phone produces better image than your 1dmk2? This phone is not even better than my 50 bucks 5 year old camera.

1 upvote
David Cheok Photography
By David Cheok Photography (Sep 11, 2013)

Troll much? Dont like it.. dont buy it. You sound like Apple bit you on your butt.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
AndreaV
By AndreaV (Sep 11, 2013)

Well, the quality is definitely good for a phone, but still I would not compare to a 1dmk2. And as others pointed out, there are no photos in low light or challenging situations.

2 upvotes
David Cheok Photography
By David Cheok Photography (Sep 12, 2013)

Yeah i agree that there are no challenging situation images seen yet. Can't really critique until we have the phones in our hands.

0 upvotes
deep7
By deep7 (Sep 10, 2013)

These samples are really impressive! Easily good enough for the target market - i.e. almost everyone.

2 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Sep 11, 2013)

Yes if you will resize them back to 2MP which is just about right for 4x6 prints. Otherwise, horrendous noise, jaggies, pixelation and mushy foliage everywhere.

3 upvotes
curtisbrandt
By curtisbrandt (Sep 11, 2013)

jcmarfilph: Um, I think you're being a little unfair. These are super clean for CELL PHONE PICTURES. They're easily a match for images from the last compact camera I purchased. And, being bundled with a presumably fantastically capable device, along with other cell phone cameras available today, absolutely nail the coffin for camera makers still putting tiny sensors in cameras that are...just cameras.

Comment edited 33 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Sep 11, 2013)

My GE A950 camera which costs less than 50 bucks takes better pictures than this overpriced phone. Do you really need to upload your picture right away every time you take it? I'd rather carry a travelzoom cam for my photography and use my phone for calls and texting.

2 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (Sep 11, 2013)

@jcmarfilph

I do not see this horrendous noise, jaggies, in the sample images provided. The low light indoor aquarium jellyfish shot when pixel peeping is a little guilty of mushyness, but it is expected and still quite acceptable for descent sized prints. I would really like to see some uploaded full resolution images from your GE A950, so you can prove us all wrong.

2 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Sep 11, 2013)

Sure here yah go....

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5451/9719286317_8ee3da4c67_o.jpg

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3722/9722508608_602854a4b5_o.jpg

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3679/9719271163_b998a7cc03_o.jpg

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7365/9722491500_6c3697d4fc_o.jpg

This one is behind a double-glazed window...

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2860/9722491912_bb872bb258_o.jpg

3 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (Sep 11, 2013)

nod bad jcmarfilph, although there seems to be issues with the fruit bowl shot, where the apple edges seems to be over sharpened.

As for the one captured behind double glazed glass. It definitely shows up alot of noise and again the contrasty edges are oversharpened and the overall color and noise reduction reminds me of what the old Nokia N95 used to be like.

The images you have posted for viewing are lovely to view at as a whole thanks you your good eye and skills, but when pixel peeping, I do not see the GE A950 capturing better images than the iPhone 5s at the same focal length.

If it is zoom you were wanting, yes the iPhone 5s will not be able to compete against the GE a950, but then again, if you have no zoom, you just have to somehow get closer!

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Sep 11, 2013)

"I do not see this horrendous noise, jaggies, in the sample images provided. "

Yup, no jaggies - unlike with, say, the Z1 or, to a lesser degreem the in-camera downsampled images of the 1020.

IQ-wise, the 5s doesn't seem to be bad. However, it's not the lack of IQ that I'm pretty disappointed of but the lack of OIS, stereo recording, 1080p60 and the other stuff I've listed below.

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Sep 11, 2013)

@Bigley: For the price of 50 bucks, iPhone was put to shame in any department except on the brighter lens at wider end but I can shoot handheld with my GE at very low shutterspeed. Macro of my GE is amazing and cannoy be touched by iPhone. SDOF too. Telephoto is given, but if you want to be caught shooting something or to be bitten by a crocodile or fall down the cliff then yes you can go closer with your iPhone.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 14 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Marsontherocks
By Marsontherocks (Sep 11, 2013)

Get over it, I'm not using your camera as I don't own it. My NEX 5N easily beats your GE...I don't carry it with me every day as I do with my iPhone 5, so I really don't see the reasoning for your bitching... Don't like it, don't buy it

1 upvote
ElessarJD
By ElessarJD (Sep 11, 2013)

One important thing to note, you're comparing stand-alone point and shoots to a camera phone. Guess what people are more likely to have on them for a shot? That's right, their phone. So the fact that camera phones are competing against even $50 stand alones is a good thing. You can own the most expensive camera in the world, but it doesn't mean squat if you don't have it to take unplanned pictures. I think the samples look amazing considering it's a camera crammed into a multifunction device. They'll only get better as time progresses too. People have illogical expectations and are comparing apples to oranges here (no pun intended).

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Sep 11, 2013)

"Get over it, I'm not using your camera as I don't own it. My NEX 5N easily beats your GE...I don't carry it with me every day as I do with my iPhone 5, so I really don't see the reasoning for your bitching... Don't like it, don't buy it"

Poor and miserable. You are contented with the mediocre images from iPhone?

1 upvote
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (Sep 11, 2013)

@ jcmarfilph. for $50, those macro shots are indeed impressive. I suspect even on my Sony Nex, it would be pretty hard to get macros like that. This is when a smaller sensor is more ideal thanks to it's less shallow depth of field.

As for capturing telephoto, indeed there is no compromise for a zoom lens in dangerous situations, but that is why I use my Nokia 808 which can achieve a descent 2.5x lossless zoom.

Here is some image I captured using zoom from the Nokia

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bigley/9401980806/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bigley/9399226681/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bigley/9435208558/

0 upvotes
0lf
By 0lf (Sep 10, 2013)

Looks better than Z1.
But the 1020 seems untouchable.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Sep 10, 2013)

Yup, def. better than the Z1.

0 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (Sep 11, 2013)

must have a better image processing algorithm. To me the Z1 and the 1020 share similar traits where there is noise at the base ISO, just the 1020 processes the noise into a much more filmic appearance, whereas Z1 leaves the noise essentially (as is) as digital artifacts.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Sep 11, 2013)

The Z1 also seems to have some horrible demosaicing algorithm. See for example DPReview's own gallery: http://connect.dpreview.com/sample-galleries/5820745257/sony-xperia-z1-sample-gallery/2436893269/fullscreen?back=http%3A%2F%2Fconnect.dpreview.com%2Fpost%2F7903063822%2Fsony-xperia-z1-sample-gallery%23embeddedSampleGallery5820745257

I've created a crop of it at http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9714629514/ - the jaggies are REALLY bad.

0 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (Sep 12, 2013)

you are right! This seems to be a classic example of not using enough edge enhancement and noise reduction! I suspect this may be the flaw in BSI we have been looking for, since all other BSI examples seen so far have masked this effect with heavy noise reduction and edge sharpening! Considering the pixel pitch is very similar to the 1020, albeit less total mega pixels and hence smaller sensor, this would explain why the 1020 excessively edge sharpens and why a heavier handed noise reduction is applies compared to the Nokia 808

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 10, 2013)

Where did they take that jellyfish photo from ? The "yellow submarine" ? ;-)

0 upvotes
Skeptical Steve
By Skeptical Steve (Sep 11, 2013)

If I recall correctly, Phil Schiller speaking at the launch function said it was shot "in an aquarium". Presumably it wasn't necessary to immerse the iPhone to produce teh image.

0 upvotes
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 11, 2013)

Oh !!! Thank you, for a moment i believed there WAS a yellow submarine !!

:-)

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Sep 12, 2013)

Quite lucky it is almost dead and not moving so the phone was able to use low ISO which is still mushy.

2 upvotes
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 12, 2013)

30'sec shutter speed ? ;-)

0 upvotes
msechea
By msechea (Sep 10, 2013)

Significant amount of noise in the sky on that last shot with the skateboarder. About as much as the third sunset/sunrise one.

0 upvotes
Tom Zimmer
By Tom Zimmer (Sep 10, 2013)

I agree this may be a concern, but it can also be caused by compression for the web. Of course if these came directly from Apple, you wouldn't expect them to have this kind of issue. We will have to wait for some real "raw" or as close to raw as you can get with an iPhone image to see if there is really a problem.

0 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (Sep 11, 2013)

I think it is expected there will be some noise in sky even with 1.5 micron sized pixels

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Sep 11, 2013)

"I think it is expected there will be some noise in sky even with 1.5 micron sized pixels"

Unfortunately, on these images, not only the deep blue skies at base ISO have noise in them but all color channels. That's all you can have at such small photodiode sizes.

Nevertheless, these shots are still significantly better, noise-wise, than those of the iPhone 5 / most other smartphones.

Comment edited 28 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Philip Goh
By Philip Goh (Sep 11, 2013)

I'm actually more impressed by the fact that the sunset picture appears to show an out of focused background!

0 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (Sep 12, 2013)

Philip, yes the sunset picture shows impressive bokeh. I suspect it is a combination of a larger sensor, and also the foreground subject is relatively small, so the iphone can frame closer.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Sep 10, 2013)

Also note that the high-speed video modes may be suffering from pixel binning. That is, the 720p120 mode may, in reality, only capture at half the resolution in both directions; that is, 640*360.

At least that's the case with the iPhone 5 running on iOS7 (see http://www.iphonelife.com/blog/87/will-ios7-indeed-support-60fps-video-recording-yes-it-will for some precise resolution measurements.)

All in all, the photo-related improvements are indeed minimal, even if you take the, compared to the iPhone 5, double-Megapixel panorama mode, the somewhat (not much - the difference is WAY smaller than, say, between 1/3" and 1/2.3" or 1/2.3" and 1/1.7") larger sensor and brighter lens into account:

- still no double capturing (which would HIGHLY be useful when you'd like to include the image of the person taking the shot in the final video / pic too), unlike in LG G2

- no OIS (see LG G2 and Lumia 1020 - or, if you're looking for something cheaper, the Lumia 92x or the HTC One)

(contd below)

Comment edited 13 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Sep 10, 2013)

- no stereo audio recording (at least they didn't mention this) - come on Apple, it's late 2013 and every single other flagship smartphome records audio in stereo while shooting video!

- still not any kind of manual modes, not even via third-party apps (via API calls) - come on Apple! Stock Android / WinPhone have been having some of these (WB / proper exposure compensation / ISO setting) since their inception

- still a not very wide lens most other flagship smartphones have 28mm lens; the 5S still seems to have 33mm)

All in all, I'd say it's not worth upgrading from the 5.

1 upvote
jwalker019
By jwalker019 (Sep 10, 2013)

You keep mentioning "OIS" - on this and the other thread. iPhone has had image stabilization for years - what specifically are you looking for?

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Sep 10, 2013)

"You keep mentioning "OIS" - on this and the other thread. iPhone has had image stabilization for years - what specifically are you looking for?"

OIS is much-much better and more efficient than the electronic counterpart (EIS). Actually, the latter only works in videos and even then much-much less efficiently - basically, it can only fix 10% shakes, unlike better OIS modules.

And it's really possible to come up with some kick-@ss OIS modules even in this size category - see the 1020 / 92x OIS modules' efficiency. With them, the keepers' rate of 1/2s shoots is astonishingly large. Try counting the same with the iPhone :) I don't think you'll see any sharp 1/2s handheld still shot from any iPhone.

(Hope the LG G2, my next phone, also has comparable efficiency.)

1 upvote
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (Sep 11, 2013)

Are you sure the new iphone 5s will suffer from pixel binning? The new iphone 5s has a more powerful processor than the 5, plus it is now running 64bit. Does the 1020 pixel bin? I wonder this, since it does not have a dedicated image processor

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Sep 11, 2013)

"Are you sure the new iphone 5s will suffer from pixel binning? The new iphone 5s has a more powerful processor than the 5, plus it is now running 64bit. Does the 1020 pixel bin? I wonder this, since it does not have a dedicated image processor"

Not known yet. I'll test and report on it as soon as I get access to an 5S.

0 upvotes
Skeptical Steve
By Skeptical Steve (Sep 11, 2013)

Right, we can all see the dreadful effects of the lack of optical image stabilisation in these pictures. Right.

We have a saying here in New Zealand: "Get off the grass, mate."

In other countries, like the UK, they also say "the proof of the pudding is in the eating." Judging from the quality of these digitally stabilised images I'd say your relentless insistence that only IOS can make a sharp picture is looking a little counter-factual at the moment.

And why do you keep insisting that this years' iPhone is still using last years' pixel binning? You have no evidence for this at all.

Anyone might think you have some sort of axe to grind.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Sep 10, 2013)

what's the fastest shutter and lowest ISO (32?) also would appreciate if DPReview could measure angles of all phone cameras.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Sep 10, 2013)

"angles of all phone cameras"

As Apple didn't announce they have managed to make the lens wider, I think it's still 33 mm - and significantly narrower when shooting 1080p video. After all, all smaprthone manufacturers with 28 (or wider) lens do advertise their phones with this fact - wider is better in a smartphone.

IIRC, when the iPhone 5 was announced, Apple did mention during the keynote its lens has become somewhat (from 35 to 33mm) wider. No such announcement today.

1 upvote
0lf
By 0lf (Sep 10, 2013)

wider is not better.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Sep 10, 2013)

I hear that the sensor is 15% larger.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Sep 10, 2013)

"wider is not better."

With smartphones, it is. After all, you will want to shoot social (for example, self-portraits with your loved ones) and/or landscape shots - and not portraits with 70-80mm equiv. This is why other manufacturers strive for as wide a lens as possible and, upon reaching 28mm equiv, they did advertise their phones as having reached 28mm. They considered the 28mm lens as a major selling point, as opposed to narrower lens.

For example, the same happened to many HTC phones.

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Sep 10, 2013)

"I hear that the sensor is 15% larger."

It is. This, however, has nothing to do with the equiv. FoV.

0 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Sep 10, 2013)

Menneisyys, you sounds like a broken record.

For me, wider is only better some of the time. When taking picture of my friends, I am very aware the wide angle lens is going to make them fatter.

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Sep 11, 2013)

Shoot from more far away and crop. Not the best way (pixelization), I know, but does the trick.

0 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (Sep 11, 2013)

""wider is not better."

With smartphones, it is. After all, you will want to shoot social (for example, self-portraits with your loved ones) and/or landscape shots - and not portraits with 70-80mm equiv. This is why other manufacturers strive for as wide a lens as possible and, upon reaching 28mm equiv, they did advertise their phones as having reached 28mm. They considered the 28mm lens as a major selling point, as opposed to narrower lens.

For example, the same happened to many HTC phones."

Agree wider is better, but having a slightly less wide angle makes for better proportions for portrait shots. Depending on the user, some may prefer more head type shots, rather than social group shots, and so in that case having a not so wide lens is beneficial. Also have a less wide lens will allow for fun adapters to give fisheye, macro, or 2x, etc.

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Sep 11, 2013)

Still smaller than a pinhead sensor.

1 upvote
natna
By natna (Sep 14, 2013)

They look nice.
Wait ISO30 -40???!!!
We want fuji velvia back!!!

And 30mm equivalent is too narrow for me...

0 upvotes
Total comments: 71
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