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HTC One: Is it the ultimate camera phone?

78

HTC has today announced its new top-end smartphone, the HTC One. As usual, a lot of rumors have been floating around the web for quite some time, with some leaked product information sprinkled in between. The new device was expected to be called the M7, but HTC has decided to simply drop the 'X' from the predecessor's name and call the new model the HTC One.

There was also talk about a Foveon-style 3-layer sensor in the new device's camera which got the attention of the mobile photography community, but it turns out this was really just a rumor. That said, today not only is the phone's name official but also the specifications. And it has to be said that, despite a conventional rather than stacked sensor, the HTC One looks rather exciting both from a general device and imaging perspective, and could easily become this season's go-to device for the mobile photographer. 

Headline-specs

  • Android 4.1.2 Jelly Bean
  • 4.7 inch, 1080p full-HD screen
  • 1.7 GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 quad-core processor 
  • 4.0MP camera with F2.0 lens and optical image stabilization
  • 2GB RAM
  • 32GB and 64GB memory configurations, but 64GB won't be available in all markets
  • No Micro SD slot, but free 25GB cloud storage on Dropbox that can be automatically synced over Wi-Fi/mobile
  • 2300 mAh battery (larger than One X+) with improved power management
  • HTC Boom Sound front-facing stereo speakers and stereo mics
  • HTC Sense TV built-in universal IR remote-control function

Looking at the specs it is clear that the HTC One is competing at the top-end of the 2013 smartphone-generation. Qualcomm's latest gen quad-core processor is the heart of the One, with Android's Jelly Bean 4.1 OS running the show. Android 4.2 with the integrated Photosphere feature would have been nice, but we have yet to see this version on a non-Nexus device.

In terms of storage space, the HTC One offers 32GB memory (a 64GB version will be available in some regions) which means ample space for music, videos and pictures, but there is no Micro-SD slot. However, you get 25GB of Dropbox cloud storage space free for two years with your purchase. 

Like its predecessor the One X and many of last year's top-of-the-range smartphones, the HTC One comes with a 4.7" screen. However, while the 2012 generation had to make do with a 720p screen resolution, the new HTC flagship boasts a 1080p full HD screen. A few of the new phones announced at the Consumer Electronics Show earlier this year, such as the Sony Xperia Z, the ZTE Grand S or the Lenovo K900 offer 1080p screens but at 5 inches or, in the Lenovo's case 5.5 inches -- making them larger and therefore less pixel-dense than the HTC. The One's display has a display resolution of 468ppi, in comparison the Samsung Galaxy S3 offers 306ppi and the Apple iPhone 5 326ppi. The HTC One display is bonded to Corning's scratch-resistant Gorilla glass.

 The HTC One is available in black...
 ...or silver and comes with a rather attractive design.

In the sound department the HTC One features dual membrane stereo mics. Essentially this means there is one low sensitivity and one high sensitivity mic for each channel, allowing for HDR sound recording that picks up low signals without clipping loud sounds. Underneath the two grilles on the phone's front you'll find the dual speakers which, as usual with HTC, incorporate Beats Audio technology. The speakers are front-facing and powered by a dedicated amplifier. HTC calls this 'Boom Sound'. They sound surprisingly good for their small dimensions. There is an option to have volume controlled automatically and like on the iPhone 5 you get noise cancellation during voice calls. The input from the ambient noise mic is also used to adjust the volume of the earpiece speaker.

Also worth mentioning is the built-in IR remote control function which allows you to operate any AV equipment, such as TVs, DVD-players and digi-boxes. We'll have to wait and see if the One will be able to control cameras with IR remote receivers too, but it's quite possible. Another nice detail is that the antennae are integrated into the metal back plate, similar to what we've seen in a recent patent filing from Apple. There are no plastics being used in the casing at all, the speaker grilles are made of metal and HTC says the sides are made from a ceramic material.

 The One's unibody shell is made from aluminium, with integrated antenna and  front-facing speaker-grilles.

From a software point of view the Blinkfeed feature, part of HTC's Sense UI, looks very interesting. It essentially unifies all your social media and favorite website feeds in one stream that is accessible from the One's unlock screen.

Camera / imaging specs    

  • 4.0MP 1/3" sensor, large 2.0uM pixels for better low-light sensitivity
  • ISO 100-1600 manually-selectable (plus Auto)
  • 28mm-equiv, F2.0 lens with OIS (2 axis, 2000Hz); 5 element design
  • 8fps continuous shooting, 99 shots, with continuous AF 
  • Full HD video, 1080p30; Full HD video with HDR, 1080p28; also 720p60

While the general device specification leaves very little to complain about it's of course the camera components and technologies we are most interested in. Here the sensor draws most attention. While it's not the much-rumored 'stacked' sensor, HTC's approach with a 4.0MP 1/3" sensor is nevertheless unusual, with most competitors opting for very pixel-dense 13MP sensors of the same size for their 2013 models. Instead, the pixels are similar in size to those found in enthusiast compact cameras such as the Canon Powershot G15 or Fujifilm X20, which should give an idea of the low-light performance to expect.

HTC likes to speak of 'ultrapixels' rather than megapixels but this is simply a marketing term, essentially meaning 'megapixels from large photosites.' Yet the Taiwanese manufacturer has to be applauded for aiming to improve the camera's low-light capability by using fewer but larger photosites on a sensor that has been developed in-house. Usually camera and phone manufacturers tend to go for 'bigger is better' in the megapixel department. It's very unusual to reduce the pixel count in a new generation; Canon's replacement of the 14MP Powershot G10 with the 10MP G11 is the only predecent we can think of.

The combination of the large-photosite sensor, a fast F2.0 lens and optical image stabilization make the HTC One look, at least on paper, like the smartphone camera to beat in 2013, especially if low-light photography is high-up on your agenda. And on a phone the low-megapixel approach makes a lot of sense. After all, most of the time you will be sharing low-res versions of your images online, and most editing apps don't support high-resolution output at this point in time.

Another imaging feature worth mentioning is the ZOE movie function. It is similar to the Best Shot functions we've seen on some other devices but appears slightly more sophisticated. It simultaneously records a 3-second full HD movie clip and still images at 5 frames per second. In addition it captures five stills before the initial shutter release. In a group shot with multiple faces you can then compile a composite still, manually selecting your favourite expression from each person, which sounds pretty awesome. This combination of stills/movie capture also allows you to pull out any still image and save it separately. ZOE movies are shareable via the HTC website.

First impressions

We haven't got a reviewable unit yet at the office, but Andy Westlake, our man in London, had a chance to play with the One at a briefing organized by HTC UK. He reports the device looks gorgeous, feels very well made and finished, and is very responsive and quick in use. The gently-curved back makes it more comfortable to hold than 'flat slab' designs and navigating the OS and reviewing images on the ultra-high-resolution screen is a pleasure too. We were not allowed to take any pictures with the device, but the combination of a sensor with large photosites, a fast F2.0 lens and optical image stabilization make us this think this could be the best phone for low-light photography yet.

Essentially in terms of specification, finish and feature-set the HTC One looks like the best Android phone to date and is also, at least on paper, way ahead of one of its no doubt closest rival, the iPhone 5. We'll only find out how the specs translate into real-life performance once we get a test unit in our hands for a few days but we are certainly looking forward to it.


Comments

Total comments: 78
Clint Dunn
By Clint Dunn (Mar 5, 2013)

I don't get all the haters. I love my HTC One X but I'm now on the pre-order for this HTC One. Awesome phone. I just hope the 64GB version is available in Canada.

0 upvotes
Photato
By Photato (Feb 22, 2013)

Finally, someone was brave enough to stop the megapixel war non-sense.
I have A4 prints shot with my old 3MP camera that look sharp.
I think though the screen density is ovelkill.
Such screen resolution demands a larger/heavier battery. I'd rather have a longer battery life, faster response and lighter weight device.

0 upvotes
Digitall
By Digitall (Feb 20, 2013)

I had an HTC and not want any more. HTC is poor in after sales service and troubleshooting software. My experience.

2 upvotes
Martin_PTA
By Martin_PTA (Feb 21, 2013)

Can't agree with you more! I'm still stuck with an HTC Flyer 3G tablet on a 2-year contract, and I promised myself never another HTC product again after my contract expires!

2 upvotes
Digitall
By Digitall (Feb 22, 2013)

To say with all sincerity, my was still under warranty, there was missing for about 4 months to complete, threw him against the wall and then stamped it, then put it in the trash. I swear.

1 upvote
vadims
By vadims (Feb 20, 2013)

Had HTC Desire and all I can say is that, until HTC sort out their huge battery problems, I won't even think of buying anything from them again.

Big pixels or small, it does not really matter if the battery is drained.

2 upvotes
tazmac
By tazmac (Feb 20, 2013)

My next phone! :)

0 upvotes
Sirandar
By Sirandar (Feb 20, 2013)

I have a One S but learned ....

No expandable memory ...... no buy (especially for such a music oriented phone)

Yes I want all my music with me .... do you really like syncing tracks? A 32 memory card isn't rocket science, it is cheap 2 year old tech as I used one in my old HTC Desire Z

0 upvotes
captura
By captura (Feb 20, 2013)

After struggling with a new HTC Desire for 6 months, which included numerous complaints and repair attempts, I finally gave up and got a Samsung phone. I kept the HTC though, and use it as a camera and radio, only.

1 upvote
meltdown117
By meltdown117 (Feb 20, 2013)

I think beyond 720p, there is really no way for our eyes to tell the difference 720p and 1080p on a 4.7 inch screen. At this point, I think it's just a marketing gimmick, although I may be wrong.

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Feb 19, 2013)

Fewer pixels all well and good but will it record raw?

1 upvote
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Feb 19, 2013)

Mostly marketing hype. The unibody design is simply a copy of iPhone5's and Beat Audio just means there will be more gangsta type playing music loudly on the subway.

As for ultrapixels, unless the underlying technology is an improvement over SONY's 13mp BSI tech, there will be no difference at regular screen resolution. The myth of lower pixel count = better low light image has been disproven with D800, Nokia 808 and RX100.

For 2013 phones, look out for SONY, Lenovo and Apple.

4 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Feb 19, 2013)

Um, the Nikon D600 beats the D800 for noise and magenta/cyan banding at higher ISOs. Which one has bigger photosites again?

The Nokia 808 aint particularly good compared to real digital cameras which record raw--like the Panasonic LX7. Nokia should allow recording of the raw data for a start.

From my not extensive testing the Nikon 1s beat the RX100 at about ISO 6400. The Sony isn't exactly useable while the Nikon 1s version one are. That Sony is impressive though.

Then of course both the Nikon D4 and D3s easily beat the D600 and D800 for high ISO lowlight shooting.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Anfernee Cheang
By Anfernee Cheang (Feb 20, 2013)

"Lower pixel count = better low light image" is not our myth but yours. The shining point is "2.0uM" pixel size. It's not just "lower pixel count" from what you said. If you cannot understand what this is, you'd better google it before presenting any nonsense. The most important is that we have not yet seen any real life images from this phone. So what is the base of your comment? Don't forget that when N808 was unveiled, it was also called hype but how about now?

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Feb 20, 2013)

Anfernee Cheang:

Sure in bright daylight the Nokia 808 is pretty good for a small sensored camera which won't record raw. But it doesn't hold up to say something like the 10MP Panasonic LX7 in any challenging situation and it doesn't come close to a micro4/3s camera or an APSC sensored camera.

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 19, 2013)

This is a nice initiative by HTC... I think it will be a good way for consumers to realize that megapixels aren't everything, and learn about sensor size, as the word will start to get out about improved image quality made with this (and faster image write times and lower lag times).

2 upvotes
Infms
By Infms (Feb 19, 2013)

My 12 mpixel Nokia N8 has a pixel size of 1.75uM. Twenty-eight (28) months later HTC are raving about a 4 mpixel sensor with 2.0uM sized pixels? Riiight.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 19, 2013)

what size sensor is on your Nokia?
you DO realize that larger pixels are better, right?

Comment edited 15 minutes after posting
1 upvote
GeorgeZ
By GeorgeZ (Feb 19, 2013)

He made his point, maybe you didn't get it.

6 upvotes
Infms
By Infms (Feb 20, 2013)

@Timmbits Yep, I do realize this. I'm just surprised that 28 months later the HTC's sensor pixels are now 12.5% larger albeit it only has 4 million of them. Is this really something to get excited about? It'll be interesting to see the final results.

1 upvote
Hobbit13
By Hobbit13 (Feb 20, 2013)

The Nokia N8 makes better images than any HTC currently on the market, thus it is correct if HTC raves about this, if it is only slightly better than the N8. Don't expect N808 quality, that would be too bulky and expensive.

2 upvotes
chillgreg
By chillgreg (Feb 19, 2013)

Great wrap-up Lars, thanks! :)

2 upvotes
AngryCorgi
By AngryCorgi (Feb 19, 2013)

That's the same pixel pitch as a 1/1.7" 10MP camera. In other words, not really impressive. Take 4MP crops (not resizes) from an LX7 (same pixel pitch) at various ISO settings and see how fantastic those are.

3 upvotes
AEndrs
By AEndrs (Feb 19, 2013)

Which is not bad at all for a device intended to be always with you.

3 upvotes
AngryCorgi
By AngryCorgi (Feb 19, 2013)

I don't think it will be any eye-opener. Not unless it shoots and saves in a raw format.

1 upvote
gorankh
By gorankh (Feb 19, 2013)

Is this the new Macbook retina phone

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Feb 19, 2013)

The reverse, if only the "retina" display could equal the colour of my lower resolution laptop.

0 upvotes
KoukiFC3S
By KoukiFC3S (Feb 19, 2013)

Sample shots here: http://blog.gsmarena.com/here-are-the-first-samples-from-the-htc-one-ultrapixel-camera/

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 31 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Maverick_
By Maverick_ (Feb 19, 2013)

my second post on this. Why do we need 1080P on a 4.7" screen? What's the purpose except bragging right. I have a Samsung Galaxy Note II with 5.5" screen in brilliant 720P Superamoled and I wouldn't want my resolution to increase at all. It will only shrink down all content.

Keep 1080 for TVs and 720 for smartphones. Stop this madness!

2 upvotes
Richard Shih
By Richard Shih (Feb 19, 2013)

The size of the icons / content do not change. You just get a clearer and sharper image.

8 upvotes
Maverick_
By Maverick_ (Feb 19, 2013)

sharper image? How much sharp a 4.7" smartphone needs to be. Mine at 5.5" is brilliant! it's just for bragging rights let's face it. waste of resources. I bet when you browse the web everything shrinks to twice small.

1 upvote
KoukiFC3S
By KoukiFC3S (Feb 19, 2013)

It's always good to push technology further. If we settled on good enough, we'd all still be using the HVGA resolution from the first iPhone.

5 upvotes
Maverick_
By Maverick_ (Feb 19, 2013)

720 on such small screens is just right.

look at digicams AKA point and shoot, they are basically remaining at around 12-16MP because that's a nice balance of size vs image quality. just because you can shove a 23mp into a 1/2.3 should you do it in the name of technology?

this 1080P on smartphone is purely nonsensical and for bragging rights.

0 upvotes
Richard Shih
By Richard Shih (Feb 19, 2013)

720p may be just right for you, while others want as much clarity as can be afforded. The Note II has a pixel density of 267ppi while the One is 469ppi. If the software and hardware can support it, why not push the limits?

Also LCD panels get cheaper to produce as technology matures and advances. Before this year 4K was a pipedream while in a few years' time probably every TV will be 4K.

4 upvotes
Maverick_
By Maverick_ (Feb 20, 2013)

again, minute clarity can't be detected on such small screens. on 4.7 you can't really tell a 720 from a 1080. you can tell brightness and color representation though. it's just a marketing gimmick. HTC does it just to up Samsung on specs. We'll see if Sammy will pick up on this.

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
1 upvote
KoukiFC3S
By KoukiFC3S (Feb 20, 2013)

Well the Samsung AMOLED panels aren't exactly known for their great color accuracy and brightness. A high MP count is useless in a small sensor, but how does a 1080p hurt the phone? It's still getting great performance and the battery life is also quite good. I don't see any downsides.

2 upvotes
Caleido
By Caleido (Feb 20, 2013)

I'm not a big fan of 1080p smartphones either. I see a 720p 4.3" screen as ideal, personally.
There is a point you stop seeing improvement in ppi. I believe that 4.7" and 1080p is way over that point. It is just wasting valuable battery and cpu cycles.

I agree, technology should be pushed forward, but I rather have a 4.3" 720p smartphone with a new technology battery that lasts 5 days than a 4.3" 1080p with mediocre colors/contrast that lasts 1 day.
When I get dark and cynical thoughts, I feel like they can't improve battery and just put sharper displays in smaller form factors to detract attention from where the real improvements should be.

1 upvote
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Feb 20, 2013)

odd how HTC have called time on the megapixel race for camera sensors, and then gone full throttle down that same megapixel race on the screens.

2 upvotes
Karroly
By Karroly (Feb 24, 2013)

Human eye resolution is about 1 minute of arc.
It is roughly 1/10 millimeter for a viewing distance of 30 centimeter or, for Anglo-Saxon people, roughly 250 ppi for a viewing distance of 1 foot. NO need to go beyond 250 ppi unless you are short-sighted and need to look at your smartphone screen at half a foot !

0 upvotes
AZBlue
By AZBlue (Feb 19, 2013)

Can't wait for all of the "pro" users to start using this as their main video camera and then complain they aren't getting the results they want. Not unlike all of those "pro" DSLR shooters who complain that video isn't as good as dedicated video cameras. Really? You don't say... LOL

1 upvote
d3xmeister
By d3xmeister (Feb 19, 2013)

Pixel size does not really matter. You'll see this sensor would be at most on par with 1/2,3 compact cameras, not even close to G series. That's because what matters more is TOTAL light gathered and resolution. Mock my words. That's why a D7000 is not even close to a D800.

4 upvotes
ryansholl
By ryansholl (Feb 19, 2013)

Mock your words? LOL

6 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Feb 19, 2013)

My Verizon HTC Droid DNA with 5" 1080p display (441ppi) is great so it looks like HTC will have some interesting smartphones when my 2 year contact is up and I am sure 1080p60 will be on them by then.

1 upvote
kff
By kff (Feb 19, 2013)

Senzor similar Sigma Faveon .... ?

2 upvotes
solarsky
By solarsky (Feb 19, 2013)

No. It's just a normal 2µm 4MP Bayer-Sensor combined with some marketing slang. So it only has effective 1 MP true RGB-resolution. Totally lame. My Nokia 808 has a 1.4µm 41.48 MP Bayer-Sensor which gives me effective 10.37 true RGB-resolution. HTC will just be trying to make the best out of additional well-capacity offered by larger sensor diodes and BSI-design. The rest is anything but "PureView"...

5 upvotes
solarsky
By solarsky (Feb 19, 2013)

Sic.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Randomoneh
By Randomoneh (Feb 20, 2013)

Are you sure? I see a lot of "every element captures RGB" talk online.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Feb 20, 2013)

"talk" is cheap. Especially "online".

0 upvotes
GeorgeZ
By GeorgeZ (Feb 19, 2013)

Looks gorgeous, as HTC phones usually do.
They were always way behind of Samsung or Nokia in the imaging department, hopefully this is a new chapter for them. I use a Nokia 828, almost always at the 5MP recommended setting. But if 4MP are enough? Personally I think 5-8 is the sweet spot but for normal print it's certainly ok.
I also have a HTC Desire X with Beats audio and it has the very well known noise issue, despite being advertised as a great phone for audio playback. So much for marketing blabla. I only believe it once I see and hear it myself.

0 upvotes
daciangroza
By daciangroza (Feb 19, 2013)

with every new iteration of smartphone from major manufacturers my respect for what apple are doing with object design is growing. aside from the form factor, which is a given, i think nokia are the only ones that are actually original in their design. that being said, this phone looks beautiful and i hope they got the flat bevels better than on the iphone 5, where they chip and scratch very easily.
the relatively low megapixel count in the camera sensor sound very good to me.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
napilopez
By napilopez (Feb 19, 2013)

I don't get it, why is this phone unoriginal in it's design? It's not as if the iPhone were the first metal constructed phone out there. If you know HTC's history, you'd see this is very very much in line with HTC's flagship design tradition.

3 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Feb 19, 2013)

@daciangroza
Totally agree with you and not just on the smartphone front. Every "high-end" notebook or all-in-one PC looks like a clone of Macbook or iMac.... aluminum slab with chiclet style keyboard. The lone hold out seems to be IBM/Lenovo Thinkpads. Even cheapo brand such is Vizio is jumping on the copy Apple trend with their 15" notebooks.

I guess when the entire design industry uses Apple, there is nothing really to "inspire" them to design something different.

1 upvote
Fox Fisher
By Fox Fisher (Feb 20, 2013)

Let's get the facts straight here, this phone looks a lot like iPhone 5, no one can deny that. Aluminium unibody? lol that's where it becomes obvious. Even though I don't like most of other manufacturer's following Apple, It's good to see that they are finally integrating "Design" in their PC's, Phone's & tablets. Better late than never.

0 upvotes
Oddrain
By Oddrain (Feb 21, 2013)

HTC have had aluminium uni-body designs at least since the Sensation which I think came out a long time before the iPhone 5. The sensation was a so called "pebble" design which I personally prefer to theses more angular recent designs.

PS Kudos to HTC for the 4MB camera and not going down the traditional marketing path of bigger is better. Lets hope the move is one that manifests itself in the results. Looking forward to seeing some analysis of the results.

0 upvotes
CyberAngel
By CyberAngel (Feb 22, 2013)

@Oddrain
except for display megapixel marketing
Color gamut like iPhone 5? - Nope!
Fast 60Hz Screen like Lumia 920? - No way!
Practical, like gloves-on screen? - Hahaha!
More megapixels! More! MORE!

0 upvotes
Hobbit13
By Hobbit13 (Feb 19, 2013)

maybe this is the camera phone the Lumia 920 was promised to be?

1 upvote
Maverick_
By Maverick_ (Feb 19, 2013)

I hope this sets a new trend on phone camera. we don't need 8 or 13mp camera phones with such tiny sensors, good idea to limit the MP to 4 or 5 and focus instead of image quality and low light performance. Great move!

3 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Feb 20, 2013)

"You might want to consider a Vertu then"

I considered it, and liked what I saw. Not the price I would pay though.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Feb 19, 2013)

Apple went "glass back", asians copied. Apple went aluminum back, asians copy that too. Pathetic. But at least they move from their usual all-plastic junk.

1 upvote
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (Feb 19, 2013)

Don't focus as much on the back...for phones it's mostly what's inside that counts :-)

2 upvotes
mano42
By mano42 (Feb 19, 2013)

Well, my ericcson T39 was aluminum 10 years ago, my Desire S was also aluminum 3 years ago, and i still have it, without a scratch, but my wife's Iphone 5 is full of scratches after a 3 weeks of use. so who is copying who, and who is copying badly?

4 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Feb 19, 2013)

It is what is outside which you see and touch every day.

1 upvote
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (Feb 19, 2013)

You might want to consider a Vertu then: http://connect.dpreview.com/post/5642812416/fancy-android-smartphone-10000 :-)

Comment edited 33 seconds after posting
1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Feb 19, 2013)

"my ericcson T39 was aluminum 10 years ago, my Desire S was also aluminum 3 years ago"

T39 looks plastic on the pictures (blue? white?), and not asian. "Desire S 3 years ago" was actually announced First announced at Mobile World Congress on February 15, 2011 ( 2 years ago, unless you are writing from 2014) and was 4 years later than original iPhone, which was metal and looked just like it.

2 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Feb 19, 2013)

HTC Legend - aluminium, 2010
HTC One S - aluminium, 2012 early
Apple iPhone 5 - aluminium 2012 late

Anyway, who gives a sh!t about NIV (not invented here) attitudes? Apple are quite happy to snap up the best of whatever they see and combine it into their own designs, likewise other manufacturers, and amen to that, else we would all be left to choose between good ideas, each on a different phone.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Fox Fisher
By Fox Fisher (Feb 20, 2013)

Hello, is anybody there? The very first iPhone had Aluminium back, geez...

0 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Feb 21, 2013)

Yes, they did up to and including the 3GS, the 4 was the first with a glass back.

0 upvotes
Rally Man
By Rally Man (Feb 19, 2013)

Looks great, but lack of expandable memory killed it for me.

And for those that say 16/32GB is plenty, good for YOU, not for ME.

6 upvotes
Digital Suicide
By Digital Suicide (Feb 19, 2013)

Would make sense if you'd work at CERN...

0 upvotes
ZC Lee
By ZC Lee (Feb 19, 2013)

HTC One come with 32/64GB. no 16GB option.

0 upvotes
Fox Fisher
By Fox Fisher (Feb 20, 2013)

I still don't get people complaining about non-expandable memory. Unless you are listening to every song on your library everyday or watching every movie you had again everyday, it just does not make sense... You don't have to carry your entire collection with you everyday.

0 upvotes
Rally Man
By Rally Man (Feb 20, 2013)

You think I only carry music? I carry much more then that on my phone. Even if there is no 16GB option, I don't like being charged usually $100 dollars for the next memory upgrade.

2 upvotes
TheProv
By TheProv (Feb 19, 2013)

They really surprised me. I never thought that they built a new sensor in house. My idea was a 12 mpx 1/3" that generate 4 mpx images thanks to processing like nokia pureview.

And the same, optical stabilization... wow! Lumia 920 is not alone anymore.

If the optics had been F1.4, we were talking about a monster.
But even with F2 it's really a HUGE camera department.

Really appreciate your efforts, HTC!

P.S. sorry my english. I'm italian and writing (and thinking) fast :D

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Feb 19, 2013)

I would rather have an F1.4 lens than an F2.0 but at least it is not an F3.2 lens.

4 upvotes
Sonyshine
By Sonyshine (Feb 19, 2013)

The quality of the camera is top of the list for my next new smartphone.

I'm not fussed about the OS or the other gadgets - all I want is a smartphone that works as a phone, has a decent browser and a really good top quality camera.

This one may go on my list....'scuse the pun!

0 upvotes
MarcelLuettmann
By MarcelLuettmann (Feb 19, 2013)

Have a look at the Nokia 808. Outdated OS, but with 5,5 phone cams built in (measuring the sensor size, and sensor size matters more than pixel pitch).

2 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Feb 19, 2013)

"Full HD video with HDR"

That sounds interesting.

3 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (Feb 19, 2013)

seems to be thing of the season, the Sony Xperia Z does hdr video too

3 upvotes
Total comments: 78
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