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Google working on RAW imaging for Android

84
Initially, we found the Nexus 5's camera specs to be kind of underwhelming. Would RAW image capture and processing convince photographers to buy the 8MP phone?

After digging into the publicly-available application programming interface (API) for Android 4.4 Kitkat, code-reading sleuth Josh Brown made some observations on his Google+ page

"Looks like Google was working on a new Camera API, but it didn't make the KitKat release," he posted, linking to a comment left by a Google developer saying: "DO NOT MERGE: Hide new camera API. Not yet ready."

Ars Technica did some serious digging into the code and found some strong clues as to what Google had in store for the KitKat release.

Here is some of the cool stuff that Ars Technica revealed:

"Full-capability devices allow for per-frame control of capture hardware and post-processing parameters at high frame rates. They also provide output data at high resolution in uncompressed formats, in addition to compressed JPEG output.

General RAW camera sensor image format, usually representing a single-channel Bayer-mosaic image. Each pixel color sample is stored with 16 bits of precision.

The layout of the color mosaic, the maximum and minimum encoding values of the RAW pixel data, the color space of the image, and all other needed information to interpret a RAW sensor image must be queried from the {@link android.hardware.photography.CameraDevice} which produced the image."

It looks like RAW for Android is definitely in development, but not for all devices. Your smartphone must have the hardware and processing power to handle the large files. Since the RAW feature was expected to come out with KitKat, we can expect that the Nexus 5 hardware will be capable of handling RAW files, but there is no way to know at this point.

"The camera device is removable and has been disconnected from the Android device, or the camera service has shut down the connection due to a higher-priority access request for the camera device."

This is one of the coolest things in the code. Referring to a Sony QX-like device that is removable from the smartphone, this fragment makes us wonder if Google is including this in the code for Sony's camera accessory or if it is developing its own version of the display-less digital camera.

If RAW is coming to Android, we have a lot to look forward to from the Android app developer community. While Windows Phone 8 users may be able to take RAW photos on the Lumia 1020 and 1520, Android users have a lot more photo apps to choose from. Photo Mate is currently the only app that we know of that is capable of processing RAW files on a mobile device but  Photoshop Touch and Snapseed will hopefully step up and offer RAW editing, with other app developers following their lead.

If you have experience reading code and want to do some snooping of your own, here is the link to the camera API comment that started all of this.

Comments

Total comments: 84
kff
By kff (8 months ago)

Google has a concept to the future :
http://www.google.com/nikcollection/products/analog-efex-pro/

and a first Android was developed for cameras ...

and for some jobs are better servers:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenPOWER_Consortium

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/POWER8

and Adobe would be out of game without he has Linux version sw

Comment edited 5 times, last edit 14 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
kff
By kff (8 months ago)

Google, IBM, Mellanox, NVIDIA, Tyan Announce Development Group for Data Centers: http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/41684.wss

0 upvotes
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (8 months ago)

I'm against RAW in smartphones and video in stills cameras. Sure I don't have to use it but it bugs me enough to rant about it on the internet. Blah blah blah, wasted development costs, blah blah, cost to implement, blah blah, my $5 is worth so much that I won't buy these products*

*actually will buy

1 upvote
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (8 months ago)

Hehe, otherwise one can buy now the 'very cheap' galaxy nx frankenstein camera and have a 'very pocketable' android camera capable of shooting raw :-) :-) :-)

0 upvotes
brecklundin
By brecklundin (8 months ago)

Given the way Google feels about Adobe...what are the odds they will even use DNG instead my cash is on a new "Google Standard" RAW....beta of course....screw Google. Once they were fine then they got stockholders and stopped being inventive and customer oriented.

1 upvote
Sordid
By Sordid (8 months ago)

Blah.
Google is without any doubt still among the most innovative companies in the world.

2 upvotes
TruePoindexter
By TruePoindexter (8 months ago)

I'm not sure what you're saying? Google integrates a version of Flash into Desktop Chrome and Chrome OS. They also have their own PDF reader and offer the option to "print" to PDF through Chrome. Google Drive understands PDF files. Google and Adobe play nice often. They compete sometimes yes but neither are petty.

0 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (8 months ago)

When have Google and Adobe ever had a major spat? They supported Flash on mobile longer than anyone thought they should, and it was Adobe's decision to kill it off eventually... As others have said, Chrome actually makes Flash safer by building it I'm and auto updating it in a seamless way Adobe could never quite manage, and they continue to support the PDF format with lots of their mobile/cloud services. You can print anything to PDF on the N5 without installing anything. I think you're getting your Googles and Apples mixed up.

0 upvotes
Leandros S
By Leandros S (8 months ago)

@TruePoindexter: You're not serious, right? Even Google doesn't have the power to kill either Flash or PDF, and they'd look bad if those media couldn't be accessed, so they have to support them. Simple as that.

0 upvotes
ShutterAttache
By ShutterAttache (8 months ago)

I for one like the idea that smartphones will be able to use RAW as an option, i just recently started using a RAW workflow and so i have lately only been buying cameras that can shoot RAW. but even though a RAW capable camera is getting more compact and pocket sized, the only camera that i know i will have in my possession 95% of the time will be my android phone and having the option to have more dynamic range in a smartphone camera is a great feat.

its great that we have optical image stabilization slowly making its way to the smartphones, and now RAW as well. those simple P&S cameras will soon be a thing of the past, and whatever camera survives the war will then have to include RAW or otherwise they wont make it in the new market.

0 upvotes
AstroStan
By AstroStan (8 months ago)

Phone camera sensors are so small with shallow the pixel capacities that do not benefit much from raw, except that even a shallow raw allows the user to choose the amount of sharpening, etc. The image file might be "16 bit" but the actual dynamic range of phone images does not need or really use that depth.

However, Google explicitly intends Android to be used beyond phone/tablets so it is only logical to add support for more advanced/capable devices. Aren't there already a few "real" cameras based on Android?

0 upvotes
Boissez
By Boissez (8 months ago)

There is a handful of handsets that have 1/2.3" and larger sensors (Sony Z1, Z1s, Lumia 1020, 1520) . But as camera quality becomes more a differentiating feature that number is sure to explode in 2014.

0 upvotes
TruePoindexter
By TruePoindexter (8 months ago)

I've said it before - the ability to alter white balance in post is alone worth the move to RAW. Also those pixels when exposed well capture more than you think.

1 upvote
Matthias Hutter
By Matthias Hutter (8 months ago)

How about .DNG?

0 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (8 months ago)

Google is a NIH company - they prefer reinventing the wheel as long as it becomes a Google Wheel.

0 upvotes
neo_nights
By neo_nights (8 months ago)

There's one thing I fail to understand, though: you couldn't save RAW files previously due lack of proper hardware to process those files.

But, AFAIK, smartphones have better hardware (processing power) than most pro cameras out there. Which camera has a dual-core processor with 1.2ghz and almost 1gb RAM like my "ancient" Galaxy S2?

0 upvotes
Zdman
By Zdman (8 months ago)

Actually the way it works is that the photo module has a dedicated chip that does the democaising and picture developments and the operating system only sees the developed JPG. So the hardware has to be set up to provide a raw file directly.

2 upvotes
neo_nights
By neo_nights (8 months ago)

Thanks!

So, you could say that "proper cameras" are already a photo module themselves, while smartphone cameras (up to now) relied on those small modules which didn't take any benefit from their hardware?

0 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (8 months ago)

Depends on the phone, but those tasks are generally handled by discrete IPs, on some phones it's still built unto the SoC, on others it's a separate part altogether... I'm sure some stuff is offloaded to the main SoC CPU tho (HDR possibly?).

0 upvotes
Goodmeme
By Goodmeme (8 months ago)

I hope they provide option for Adobe raw which is already open-source AFAIK. Why reinvent the wheel, when a universal wheel has already been designed?

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (8 months ago)

Cause DNG is rather poor format in general (especially when it comes to compression).

0 upvotes
Sordid
By Sordid (8 months ago)

Hu? Compression?

2 upvotes
TruePoindexter
By TruePoindexter (8 months ago)

@Plastek - DNG is a fine format. Compression of all RAWs are a function of either the camera taking the image or the converter application.

0 upvotes
neo_nights
By neo_nights (8 months ago)

People are saying that saving RAW files is useless due the small sensors. But..... what keeps phone makers to produce a smartphone with a bigger sensor, like Nokia did?

I agree that with an 1/3" sensor there's no much to headroom to edit anyway, but for future phones, with bigger sensors, it could be great.

0 upvotes
Zdman
By Zdman (8 months ago)

Actually even with a tiny sensor you could average say 20-50 raw files (the could be taken quickly as phones use electronic shutters) could dramatically increase the picture quality for a stabelised phone.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (8 months ago)

"But..... what keeps phone makers to produce a smartphone with a bigger sensor, like Nokia did?" - I would like to know that too.
Sadly - none of the Android phones got larger sensor, so it's meaningless if they got RAW support or not. As someone said: lipstick on a pig.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 52 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Bruce McL
By Bruce McL (8 months ago)

Using RAW to change the white balance and noise reduction settings would be a big help on my existing phone, which has a tiny sensor.

Note that larger sensors generally require a lens farther away from the sensor for an equal amount of viewing angle. That can mean thicker phones or bumps on the back of phones that have bigger sensors.

0 upvotes
Peter Smithson
By Peter Smithson (8 months ago)

I'd just like the option to be able to set the shutter speed manually. How hard can it be to develop an API to allow that?

Of course - then I'd like the camera app to make use of that API.

0 upvotes
Danlo
By Danlo (8 months ago)

So, will I be able to shoot raw with my S4? That would be freaking amazing?!

0 upvotes
Sordid
By Sordid (8 months ago)

Yay! So finally, we can process those crappy pictures made with microscopically tiny sensors in RAW! Long overdue!
I hope this doesn't break the overly abused retrovintagehipstercrapster filters.

2 upvotes
Bruce McL
By Bruce McL (8 months ago)

I don’t mind people using those filters, as long as they KEEP OFF OF MY LAWN!!!

1 upvote
utomo99
By utomo99 (8 months ago)

Little bit too late but still OK.
I hope Google can add something to the current raw standard which can help making better picture/ easier processing and other good things

2 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (8 months ago)

Unless you're talking about open DNG, there is no "current raw standard." The raw bits coming off of every camera are in their own format, which is why software continually has to be updated to understand the raw files of new cameras.

Google should just save to DNG, like some Pentax and Leica cameras can. Then any of the raw processors that support DNG will be able to open it without needing an upgrade.

1 upvote
brecklundin
By brecklundin (8 months ago)

Just look up PhotoMate in the Playstore and you'll find a nice Lightroom-like app that already handles RAW files. It works very much like Adobe Lightroom. It has some limitations but generally is a useful tool. It also has a learning curve. The developer has some videos showing how the app works.

Last the dev is not an overly friendly-nice guy but the app works OK. He also is totally unable to handle critical comments so tread lightly if you want support. But this app took a LOT of work and maybe it's that sort of personality it took? Dunno but the app is worth a look.

I also use Snapseed and Photoshop Touch (no RAW for those two of course) along with PhotoMate (RAW) on my Android devices (Asus TF300t, Asus TF700t, LG Motion [Phone], Samsung Galaxy Note 8) all of which handle things fine. But none of the apps are what I would consider great or the most user friendly. But we already know Adobe is one of the LEAST user friendly companies on the planet so nothing new there.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Benarm
By Benarm (8 months ago)

lipstick on a pig...

3 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (8 months ago)

I'd rather have pig on a stick ;-)

2 upvotes
brecklundin
By brecklundin (8 months ago)

I dated her....

0 upvotes
UCSB
By UCSB (8 months ago)

RAW ... nice to think it might become available.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Impulses
By Impulses (8 months ago)

" Photo Mate is currently the only app that we know of that is capable of processing RAW files on a mobile device but Photoshop Touch and Snapseed will hopefully step up and offer RAW editing, with other app developers following their lead. "

Huh? There's a few RAW processing apps on the Play store... And a bunch of RAW backup/viewing apps too. I've been looking around because connecting a camera or a camera's SD card via USB OTG is so easy on recent phones.

RAW Vision actually looks more polished than Photo Mate, though I haven't really put either one thru it's paces. There's RAW Droid and Android Photo Review too. Think I saw one called RawPal or something as well...

Maybe you guys could save us all some money and test/compare these? Seems right up Connect's alley, not to mention more useful thananother rroundup of filter/retouching apps (no offense).

1 upvote
CaseyComo
By CaseyComo (8 months ago)

To me, a world where Google controls _everything_ is not a great thing.

4 upvotes
Amin Sabet
By Amin Sabet (8 months ago)

It's about time. Way overdue!

1 upvote
Michael Ma
By Michael Ma (8 months ago)

That would be awesome. Barrel distortion correction for face is just ridiculously bad on some phones. It would be nice if Adobe did a lens profile on the popular smartphones such as galaxy note 3, note 2, s4, s3, etc. That and the extra bit depth would want to me me actually attempt some descent photography.

1 upvote
Sordid
By Sordid (8 months ago)

You'll still be shooting with a ridiculously tiny sensor so you'll have some wonderfully noisy extra bit depth.

0 upvotes
Michael Ma
By Michael Ma (8 months ago)

Well, that was always the assumption, looking at some samples from a Nokia, it isn't as bad as people assumed. I know the Galaxy phones sensors are smaller but bottom line, definitely will be noisy, but it will be still better processed in something like ACR with more sophisticated noise reduction, corrections, adjustments.

0 upvotes
Sordid
By Sordid (8 months ago)

The Nokia samples are indeed terrible.
My ancient point and shoot makes better pictures.

0 upvotes
TruePoindexter
By TruePoindexter (8 months ago)

@Sordid - How are you evaluating the Nokia samples? My assessment is that they are excellent in reasonable lighting just like any small sensor camera. No I can't push the exposure as far as on my D600 but I can't push my GH2 that far either. What are your expectations out of the Nokia?

0 upvotes
Sordid
By Sordid (8 months ago)

My expectations? I have none!
It's a smartphone. It's made for phone calls and information over the Internet.
It's nice that they can take quite usable pictures in good sunlight but people here sound like they were about to replace cameras. They aren't.

0 upvotes
TruePoindexter
By TruePoindexter (8 months ago)

@Sordid - I think you're expecting too much. Yes the quality is not as good as a large DSLR. Yes the quality is not as good as any mirrorless camera. The quality isn't even as good as most point and shoots. However when exposed properly and viewed at the appropriate size you would be hard pressed too find fault in the final result. Some very talented photographers have shot comparisons between iPhone's and DSLR's and it was near impossible to guess which was which.

0 upvotes
cinemascope
By cinemascope (8 months ago)

RAW is nice, but what about something in between, say PNG?

The world needs to stop producing content exclusively and directly to a crappy lossy format such as JPEG.
JPEG is for distribution... Internet... Sharing... That's it.
JPEG is not for content production... Not for saving treasured memories...

I know phones are used for sharing, but many of its images do get stored for future appreciation too.
How many new born babies these days have their first photo taken by a phone?
Just create the crappy JPEG at the moment of sharing... Done!
And keep the proper copy. Duh?

Sure RAW might be too complicated and overkill to most phone users... Not everyone will care to change WB later, or to keep the original bayer info intact.
But it makes sense to use a proper demosaiced, non-lossy format for creation and storage.
We are in the HD era, it's not 1990 anymore, why we keep recording to a crappy distribution format?

It's like recording a feature film directly to DVD or VHS...

Sorry.
/rant

0 upvotes
new boyz
By new boyz (8 months ago)

Most phone sensors are crappy so extra data headroom is useless if you don't have a good data in a first place.

JPEG is like MP3, the best quality/file size compromise, for now.

3 upvotes
cinemascope
By cinemascope (8 months ago)

My point exactly. A musician will not record directly to MP3. He/She will pick a lossless format then at the end will use MP3 to distribute. JPEG was created for final distribution when the Internet was much slower...

It's like saying nobody will ever take a photo worth saving with a phone anyway so why bother...
I don't care or need RAW in a phone but I don't want randomly compressed JPEGs too...
Phones come with up to 32GB these days and an extra card is cheap anyway. Why not?

Same is true for any normal camera... High quality JPEG? What for? We should have a small/web JPEG, TIFF, and RAW. I think the D800 does this... HQ JPEG is an oxymoron...

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (8 months ago)

new boyz is right: a musician would not use a cellphone in the first place!

0 upvotes
Zdman
By Zdman (8 months ago)

Png would still not be good enough as it would be 8bit and already demosaiced. If you took multiple shots (10-20) while the phone is stable you could average the RAW files and produce a relatively low noise 10-bit image. If you tried to do the same with PNG you would never get more than 8 and demosaiced errors would add to the noise.

0 upvotes
cinemascope
By cinemascope (8 months ago)

No one is talking about recording music with a phone...
PNG allows 16-bit per channel. But it could be JPEG2000 in lossless mode or whatever. Just enough of this lossy stuff... And it's also my point that it is good that it is already demosaiced, for convenience, otherwise just use raw...
I am talking about something in between the two extremes of raw data and lossy data.

0 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (8 months ago)

PNG is not going to help because it gives you none of the advantages of raw while also giving you none of the compressibility of JPG. Lose / lose!

0 upvotes
cinemascope
By cinemascope (8 months ago)

Again, my point exactly.
Some people don't need the advantages of RAW and we all don't need to be force fed lossy compressibility anymore in 2013...
Why can't I choose to keep a full quality TIFF/PNG if I want to and have 32GB to waste?
To create content directly and exclusively to a lossy format is just plain wrong...

0 upvotes
Vladik
By Vladik (8 months ago)

how predictable :)

1 upvote
npires
By npires (8 months ago)

Can already decode RAW files taken with my Sony NEX-5 on Android using an app called Photo-Mate. Have a look.

EDIT: Whoops I see it's already been mentioned.

Comment edited 40 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (8 months ago)

That app is for images taken with raw capable cameras.

This story is about making Android phone cameras raw capable. Either the built in camera, or a clip on like the Sony QX

0 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (8 months ago)

Ah, that's good news!

0 upvotes
Peter Galbavy
By Peter Galbavy (8 months ago)

Android is making it into "real" cameras now so this is to be expected. Look at the Samsung etc.

2 upvotes
noirdesir
By noirdesir (8 months ago)

This is welcome, though 16 bit is overkill. Take for example the Nikon P330 pixel of 1.8 μm size (most smartphone pixels are smaller than this) and it gets less than 12 stops of engineering dynamic range with a very flat read noise curve and a very high QE of 75% (possibly somewhat a calculation artefact). I haven't done the math but I would estimate that a 1 μm pixel with a QE of 100% and a read noise of zero wouldn't get more than 12 stops of DR.
Add one bit for over-encoding, hey even two, and anything more than 14 bit is just encoding noise. And for real sensors with a QE of less than 100% and some read noise, a 12 bit encoding is very likely completely sufficient.

2 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (8 months ago)

Sadly, consumers buy the item with the bigger figures...

0 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (8 months ago)

The point is to build-in the functionality. So when Nikon releases the touchscreen-interface-based D5 professional full-frame mirrorless camera running Android, it's all good...

1 upvote
Matthias Hutter
By Matthias Hutter (8 months ago)

" I would estimate that a 1 μm pixel with a QE of 100% and a read noise of zero wouldn't get more than 12 stops of DR."
No, because there is no DR limit - if you have a very high full well capacity and very bright exposure.

0 upvotes
music4ever
By music4ever (8 months ago)

New Nokia Lumia 1520 Pro Camera comes with an option - shooting in RAW. It's DNG - digital negative - format developed by Adobe

1 upvote
jkoch2
By jkoch2 (8 months ago)

Android can't handle AVCHD, SFAIK. RAW would choke small processors.

1 upvote
TruePoindexter
By TruePoindexter (8 months ago)

No... AVCHD is CPU/GPU intensive because of how the compression works. It takes a powerful machine to unpack it and play it in real time. RAW files are just the source luminosity values of each pixel and some metadata.

Plus I've been manipulating RAW's from my D600 and GH2 on both my smartphones (HTC Vivid and now Nexus 5) as well as an old Toshiba Thrive tablet. No problems to report with being too much for them to handle.

Comment edited 44 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
threeOh
By threeOh (8 months ago)

I edit raw files in my iPad Gen 1 mini which has the same CPU as a late model iPod Touch. Runs fine, not fast but not far from what a Core Duo box with decent specs would do.

I edit XTrans files, which are about as CPU intensive as D800 files on my desktop.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (8 months ago)

"Android can't handle AVCHD, SFAIK. RAW would choke small processors."

Wrong. AVCHD is a file format. You may have meant H.264, which is the encoding itself.

Which is done by Android (more specifically, the underlying SoC) just fine. Android (again, the SoC - in this case, the Snapdragon 800) doesn't even have problems with encoding 4Kp30 H.264 video streams (in the Note 3), let alone less demanding streams (1080p60, 1080p30, 720p120 etc.).

BTW, recording to AVCHD containers isn't supported / used by any smartphone OS right now. All of them record into MOV / MP4 / M4V containers.

3 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (8 months ago)

What's the point of RAW on a 13+ mp sensor the size of a pinhead? Garbage in, garbage out.

8 upvotes
TruePoindexter
By TruePoindexter (8 months ago)

The ability to modify white balance alone is worth it.

15 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (8 months ago)

It’s true the high pixel count and necessarily noisy output reduce the risk of artefacts of the type raw files can alleviate, but the other side of that coin is that any small gain from processing the raw file rather than the JPEG might be especially welcome.

Still, the fun of taking pictures with a mobile phone is that you can’t control everything. Sometimes it’s nice to just shoot like a beginner and hope something ‘comes out’.

0 upvotes
BlueBomberTurbo
By BlueBomberTurbo (8 months ago)

Controlled noise reduction would be my favorite improvement. Lots of smartphone cameras use noise reduction even at base ISO, and high ISO turns everything to mush. Even DSLRs are guilty of the second issue when shooting JPG. Bring a RAW image into ACR, and you can get a ton of detail back, while keeping noise reasonably in check. Not to mention better sharpening.

Have you tested out the 1020's RAWs, by any chance? They're amazing, considering the amount of pixels on the tiny sensor. Imagine what something with bigger, better light-gathering pixels like the HTC One could produce....

6 upvotes
TruePoindexter
By TruePoindexter (8 months ago)

@BlueBomberTurbo Agreed - not to mention that these phone makers do not always have the decades of image processing experience that the photography companies do. They make strange decisions with regards to tone curves and sharpening that given a RAW we could decide.

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (8 months ago)

Put another way, if you care enough to shoot and mess around with RAW.. then why on earth are you shooting with a pinhead sensor in the first place? Makes no sense to me.

3 upvotes
TruePoindexter
By TruePoindexter (8 months ago)

@jogger It's useful because photography is as much art as it is technical mastery.

I own a D600 and a GH2 both of which of course produce technically superior images to anything a smartphone could hope to achieve - but there are places and situations where I want to capture an image and those cameras are not the appropriate tools. They're too conspicuous to use, they're too loud, they're too big, or they're just not with me at the time. My smartphone is with me all the time so anything that lets me capture better images with it is very welcome.

Plus the visual gap at most presentation sizes is not as large as you think. Michael Reichmann and Jeff Schewe at The Luminous Landscape have done comparisons tests of iPhones, high end compacts, DSLRs, and medium format images all printed at the same sizes. It was almost impossible to tell the difference between the prints much less guess which camera took which image.

6 upvotes
zaurus
By zaurus (8 months ago)

Jogger: "Put another way, if you care enough to shoot and mess around with RAW.. then why on earth are you shooting with a pinhead sensor in the first place?"

The Samsung S4 Zoom phone has a 1/2.3" sensor.
The Samsung Galaxy NX interchangeable lens camera has an APS-C sensor.
Both run Android. More will surely follow. Both are unlocked so one would be able to install CyanogenMod and receive all new Android updates.

This is great news.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (8 months ago)

Photography on smartphones is still in its infancy. We are already seeing bigger sensors and the small sensor of today are a lot better than the ones from a few years ago...raw on smartphones is a niche product but I am sure if you look a few years ahead it'll be an interesting option for many more photographers.

2 upvotes
disasterpiece
By disasterpiece (8 months ago)

The possibility to process files from your DSLR on the go, possibly - e.g. using a Wi-Fi SD card.

0 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (8 months ago)

In future not all Android-based cameras will have small sensors. Or be smartphones for that matter.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Bruce McL
By Bruce McL (8 months ago)

@jogger "if you care enough to shoot and mess around with RAW.. then why on earth are you shooting with a pinhead sensor in the first place?"

Convenience. You didn't bring your bigger, bulkier camera with you so you use what you have.

After you shoot, you want to process the images in the same workflow you use for processing your dedicated camera images. More convenience.

The worse the original images are, the more good RAW can do.

1 upvote
markky
By markky (8 months ago)

...because it may be the only camera you have with you at the time. I don't carry my DSLR everywhere with me - do you?

(answering Richard, and agreeing with Bruce).

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Tom Z
By Tom Z (8 months ago)

Smartphone Camera RAW and DxO, what an amazing combo that would be for high quality images. I hope it happens!

0 upvotes
Total comments: 84
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