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Raw processing on Android devices with Photo Mate R2

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Image Results

Photo Mate R2 uses the open-source software dcraw for decoding Raw files but all editing algorithms are specific to the app. So if you convert a file "as shot" the final result will be identical to a conversion in dcraw but of course the whole point of Raw conversion is being able to change shooting parameters in post-production. This also means that once new camera models are compatible with dcraw their files will also work in Photo Mate R2.

In this section we have processed a few Raw images with Photo Mate R2 and, for comparison purposes, with Adobe ACR 8.2 to show you what the image results look like.  

Default settings

Below we have processed the ISO100 Canon EOS 70D Raw file of the dpreview studio shot in Photo Mate R2 and compared it to the out-of-camera-JPEG and the Adobe ACR conversion at default settings. As you can see the Photo Mate output is a little flatter and less contrasty than the JPEG file. It is also softer, with less sharpening applied. Nevertheless, there is very sightly more detail in the image, especially in the shadow areas.

Like the Photo Mate output the Adobe ACR shows some more fine detail than the out-of-camera JPEG but has some more contrast and sharpening applied, giving it a more "punchy" appearance. 

Canon EOS 70D, ISO 100, JPEG
100% crop
Canon EOS 70D, ISO 100, Photo Mate R2
100% crop
Canon EOS 70D, ISO 100, Adobe ACR 8.2
100% crop

Image Detail

We applied some additional sharpening with the smallest possible radius (0.5) to this ISO 160 Sony RX100II Raw file. All other parameters were left at their default settings.

In this test we tried to get maximum detail out of a Raw file in Photo Mate. The only two sharpening parameters offered by the app are the sharpening amount and radius. With its Detail and Masking sliders Adobe's ACR offers better control over sharpness but with some small-radius sharpening applied Photo Mate R2 squeezes a tiny amount of additional detail out of the Sony Raw file and generates a less processed looking image. The warmer color response is also noticeable.

Sony RX100II, ISO 160, JPEG
100% crop
Sony RX100II, ISO 160, Photo Mate R2
100% crop

Shadows/Highlights

This ISO 100 image which was taken with a Sony RX100II shows very strong contrast between the shady and sunny areas. We applied maximum highlight recovery and some fill light to create a more balanced result.

Recovering highlights and lifting shadows is another useful application of Raw conversion. This image was taken on a hike on a sunny day. The in-camera JPEG processing struggled with the very high contrast between sunny and shaded areas in the forest. In Raw processing a more balanced result can be created by recovering highlights and applying some fill light to the shadow areas. 

With highlight recovery set to the maximum the Photo Mate R2 output looks more balanced and natural than the out-of-camera JPEG but Adobe ACR manages to recover even more detail in the highlight areas.

The out-of-camera JPEG shows both clipped highlights and shadows.
Raw conversion in Photo Mate R2 yields a more balanced result with fewer clipped highlights and slightly lifted shadows.
With highlight recovery set to the maximum Adobe ACR recovers noticeably more detail in the highlight areas.

White Balance Correction

We modified the white balance of this Pentax K-30 ISO 12800 image to create a more natural result.

The Auto White Balance systems of digital cameras tend to create unnatural color casts under artificial light. This ISO 12800 shot was taken under candle light illumination with a Pentax K-30. The out-of-camera JPEG has a very strong orange cast that we tried to soften and make look more natural in Photo Mate. This is easily done by moving the white balance sliders in the app but no way of checking the color values in an image means you have to judge your result by eye and trust the display of your Android tablet.

Pentax K-30 ISO 12800 out-of-camera JPEG
Pentax K-30 ISO 12800, Photo Mate R2 conversion with white balance correction applied

Conclusion

Photo Mate R2 is the only fully-fledged Raw converter for Android we are currently aware of. It comes with a remarkably comprehensive feature set that is not far off some desktop packages. Enthusiast and professional users might miss lens profiles or the ability to read color values but overall Photo Mate R2 covers a large proportion of your Raw processing requirements. 

Most users are more likely to feel limited by their tablet hardware than the app's feature set. Photo Mate R2 offers a function for screen calibration but the screens of most current Android tablets don't come close to a carefully calibrated IPS monitor in terms of color accuracy, contrast and tonal range. Given the size of Raw files it's also advisable to use Photo Mate with one of the current high-end Android tablets such as the Google Nexus 10 or the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1. On the latter single file conversion takes approximately 25 seconds, so processing a batch of images can take a while. 

Photo Mate R2 uses the Raw decoding algorithms of dcraw and is therefore compatible with most current cameras. That said, in our test it occasionally had some trouble displaying files from the Pentax K-30 and flat out refused to convert a couple of files from the Nikon D800. I would recommend you try the app with files from your camera straight after installation, so you can make use of Google Play's 15 minute return policy if necessary.

Despite some minor quibbles at just under $10 Photo Mate R2 is a no-brainer for Raw shooters who already own a decent Android tablet and a more than viable backup solution for photographers who usually prefer to process Raw files on a laptop or desktop.  Thanks to the compact dimensions and low weight of tablets it could also be the software of choice for Raw shooters who like to travel light. 


 

Comments

Total comments: 76
Chuck Lantz
By Chuck Lantz (6 months ago)

I may have missed it in the article, but can the app handle Sigma X3F RAW files?

0 upvotes
Marcus Melo BR
By Marcus Melo BR (7 months ago)

I Was looking for a Android RAW processor for many months. Now I can edit my Sony NEX6 ARWs and Nikon D700 NEFs on my Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (N8000) uploading the imagens from SD and CF cards just using a simple Card Reader. Of course, Photo Mate R2 doesn't have the power of Adobe Camera Raw on my Corei7's (Desktop PC and Notebook), but still good enough to recover overexposed and underexposed images, and Fill Light feature is very usefull too. With a simple 3G connection (4G was released after I by Galaxy Note N8000) I can upload the image to facebook fast. I can do this with my Galaxy Note N7000 phone too (import, edit RAW end upload to facebook). I liked a lot. Thank You TS Systems.

1 upvote
X Faktor Photo
By X Faktor Photo (8 months ago)

I love PhotoMate, and the dev is a good guy who hears his fellow photographers pleas for features and bug fixes.
I've been out of the Android tablet game since my Nexus 7 went into a coma last year. I forgot how much I utilized PhotoMate, and now I realize I NEED to revive the N7.

0 upvotes
brecklundin
By brecklundin (8 months ago)

Sorry reading the reviews and the dev is actually not that friendly a person, well based on his often snappish comments on reviews. Dude needs a bucket of xanax. Still it's a dandy app I've been using now and then for a while now.

Of course he did the EOL on PhotoMate (original) creating a new version we all had to buy rather than upgrade or free to existing customers. First version did not have the RAW converter built-in/included and you had to buy it. None is huge and just growing pains but it's funny to watch happen and wonder when the dev is going to grind this app into the dirt then just sell it off. Hope he doesn't but does keep moving in the positive direction. V2 is AMAZING even if it sounds like I'm being negative. I like it a bunch. High learning curve though, well as Android apps go anyway. Ya have to watch the tutorial vids to get what it's all about.

0 upvotes
HubertChen
By HubertChen (8 months ago)

Can you add EXIF data?
I just spend 4 hours to find a way to add EXIF data to images in Lightroom. It can not do it and I needed to use a shell script based utility (Exiftool). It is a pain in the neck. How about add this feature to Photo Mate R2:

Motivation:
Many photographers shoot with lenses without any electronic coupling. And this trend is increasing, not decreasing, thanks to SonyE or M43 cameras with short flange mount can mount literally any lens with the proper adapter, which you can buy for a few dollars. Shooting comfort is actually quite good with these cameras cameras. But you loose one thing: EXIF data of which lens was used. Adding this feature should be straight forward, especially with the open source cross platform Perl code of Exiftool. Adding this information in the field will be great, as the memory is still fresh which picture shot with which lens. And it is something Adobe Lightroom is missing out, so a good feature for a product comparison table :-)

0 upvotes
X Faktor Photo
By X Faktor Photo (8 months ago)

Hey man, just drop Torsten Simon an email from within the app. Alternatively, make your voice heard here: https://plus.google.com/communities/105710045025831601018

0 upvotes
Mk82
By Mk82 (7 months ago)

Try digiKam what is available for Windows and OS X too. It gives you full control of photolibrary like no other software and full control of metadata even in specific profiles or batches. Editor is OK with very nice features but tools and work flow is little time consuming.

Comment edited 31 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
keepreal
By keepreal (8 months ago)

IMO, a tablet is useful for checking shots while in the field but for proper processing, most sensible people will want to wait until they get home, then do the processing proper on their PCs or MACs. Moreover, like me with a Nexus 7 and limited storage with no micro slot, they may not want to clutter up tablet space with large RAW files.

In those circumstances, Nexus Media Importer is ideal because you can look at the embedded JPEGs from the RAW files without downloading anything onto your tablet. If you do not have the ability to judge your images from a JPEG preview and what is possible once you get to work on the RAW images proper, then I hasten to add that your skills and experience may not be up to using RAW to good effect anyway. That is especially so if you bracketed exposures as many RAW users do.

Who wants RAW on their tablet except for a preview? It makes little sense to invest in a quality camera only to limit the standard of the output by modifying images on a tablet.

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (8 months ago)

There are Android tablets other than the Nexus 7. Many of these tablets have card slots.

Over time Android tablets will get faster.

"then I hasten to add that your skills and experience may not be up to using RAW to good effect anyway. That is especially so if you bracketed exposures as many RAW users do."

Huh, bracketing? No all raw shooters are shooting like that, static images.

"It makes little sense to invest in a quality camera only to limit the standard of the output by modifying images on a tablet."

In not real news, even the "retina" display on new Macbooks isn't a particularly good screen, so by your logic you'd not use a Macbook for raw extraction either.

1 upvote
wansai
By wansai (8 months ago)

let's be real. 1/2 a minute convrsions saving out is just not practical. do this on proper win8 x86 hardware tablet and it's literally a 2 second conversion. 25 seconds waiting on an image is just a huge waste of time and only really usable in absolute dire circumstances.

if i'm out in the field, i will have an x86 tablet. we are just not there yet by any stretch on any other hardware.

3 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (8 months ago)

But let's imagine a faster Android tablet in say 2016.

0 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (8 months ago)

I convert my images on an Intel i5 laptop and usually go away and make myself a tea while I wait for the images to be processed. If you process an entire batch it's always gonna take some time. To some people a few seconds more or less might matter, to many, I am sure, it doesn't.

0 upvotes
TSGames
By TSGames (8 months ago)

2 Seconds? I usually don't even get this on my workstation with 8 core AMD and 32Gig RAM. I would like to see the kind of a "Windows tablet" you're using here :)

1 upvote
HubertChen
By HubertChen (8 months ago)

@ Lars Rehm
Thanks for this. With very fast desktops I forgot about batch processing in the background. Yeah, this is also acceptable indeed when travelling. So instead of bringing a tablet during the shoot and a laptop for processing in the evening, this will actually work in terms of processing speed. I would not mind if the little guy need hours to churn out the finished JPGs for uploading.

0 upvotes
wansai
By wansai (8 months ago)

@tsgames, currently i use an i5 iconia tablet. it is fast, helped along by the speedy ssd. i pop my raw file through, apply my adjustment, then save it out. that whole process takes however long i need to get the right setting for the shot. saving it out literally takes two seconds. if i apply a preset, the whole process takes about four seconds from opening file, applying preset, saving it out.

0 upvotes
ChrisKramer1
By ChrisKramer1 (8 months ago)

I don't believe tablets can be used for fine-tuning raw images on the go. I personally find processing images on my 13" laptop in a hotel room using Lightroom or Photoshop extremely trying. Screen reflections, washed-out colours and severe eyestrain all make it a nightmare. I have a 27" monitor at home but I would still like something bigger - like the 40" Lenovo IPS monitor for about 700 Euros.

On IPad I find Artstudio works just fine. Photoshop Touch offers better selection tools - and I like its interface. But it is sadly under-developed. It could be SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO much more....

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (8 months ago)

I think this app should not be seen as a substitute to a desktop solution but an additional tool at your disposal.

0 upvotes
Paya
By Paya (8 months ago)

I think it would be an awesome product to be used with this tablet from wacom:

https://store.wacom.com/us/en/product/DTHA1300L

good screen good hardware.... just needs a great software to go with it :)

0 upvotes
Mel Snyder
By Mel Snyder (7 months ago)

Hey Chris - check out Photogene app. You may change your mind about editing on the iPad. Sure not Photoshop or Lightroom on a Mac or PC, but lots of control and real raw editing (check the Cult of Mac review a few months back)

0 upvotes
Daniel Lauring
By Daniel Lauring (8 months ago)

IMHO, this is stretching the envelope of usefulness of tablets. It is "trying too hard" to fit a 10lb brick in a 5lb basket. For RAW editing anyone would be way better off with an Ultralight laptop (like Macbook Air) or Windows tablet (like Microsoft Surface.) Heck, you can buy last year's Surface Pro for $600 with an i5 processor and 128Gb SSD. Better still the Surface has true Wacom digitizer support.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (8 months ago)

True enough in 2014, but what about in 2017? (And in 2014 the most expensive Android tablets top out at about $400.)

It's nice to see someone trying to develop decent raw extraction software for the Android system.

I think the bigger problem is thinking that touch screens can easily replace all the features of a computer mouse.

1 upvote
Paul Guba
By Paul Guba (8 months ago)

I agree why would I want to edit raw images on a tablet and to what end. Its just not the right tool. Maybe in four or five years the processors will be up to speed but the raw files will be 4-5 years more complex as well. Maybe good incase of emergency.

0 upvotes
_sem_
By _sem_ (8 months ago)

Considering that camera processors can turn raw into jpg, it shouldn't be a surprise that a tablet processor can do it, indeed it should be able to provide some extras.
The small screens aren't the best editing environment.
And I think storage space is currently the main issue with tablets. Even with USB OTG or Eye-fi, you're still stuck with tablet flash card, plus one microSD, optionally. Not remotely suitable as the regular raw converting device, and for storing batches of images. I can imagine it as a viewing device for jpgs (shooting raw+jpg), and occasionally checking if a harsh-lit scene is recoverable using such a raw converter.
A tablet could be used to make backups on the go, for instance from USB OTG to spare microSDs. But once I did try a similar operation, and it wasn't as convenient as it may sound at first glance.

As for ultraportables, they're not so much better, the main difference is that they contain a SSD disk rather than cards. I prefer a regular laptop.

1 upvote
Jeff Peterman
By Jeff Peterman (8 months ago)

It all depends on what you're trying to do. I don't see this as replacing a "real" computer with a full RAW processor/editor. I see this as a tool to have a look at your chosen images in the field and then adjust them to see if you have what you need. Maybe you You've taken 200 shots and you scan through them and pick your best ten to work on with this App on your tablet. Then, when you get back, you copy over the sidecar files from those images and the RAW files and do final tweaking on your desktop/laptop with Lightroom. But this is speculation on my part, as I haven't tried it yet.

2 upvotes
Rambalac
By Rambalac (8 months ago)

Tablets have one advantage, they can be charged with light solar panel. For any ultralight laptop solar panel is much heavier.
And still tablets are atleast 3 times lighter than any laptop

1 upvote
yslee1
By yslee1 (8 months ago)

25 seconds to open a RAW file even on a Snapdragon 800? Ouch.

1 upvote
SirSeth
By SirSeth (8 months ago)

25 seconds to convert; not to open a RAW file. And that's a 20mp file. A little slow, but it's a little slow in LR on a fast computer.

2 upvotes
TSGames
By TSGames (8 months ago)

Please always keep in mind that an ARM processor, if even it is a Snapdragon 800, has the power which is may equal to a Pentium 3. So, if you consider this, I think the performance is almost the fastest you can get on such a hardware

If you just preview the file it's somewhat less than a second on the latest mobile hardware.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (8 months ago)

25 seconds to convert a 20MP image is not too bad, and if you have a work flow plan, you can set the tablet to convert in the background.

0 upvotes
sharkcookie
By sharkcookie (8 months ago)

great review!

1 upvote
Jeff Peterman
By Jeff Peterman (8 months ago)

First, as others have said, don't forget OTG. I've been using an OTG adapter cable to connect a card reader (CF or SD) to Android devices or years and then copying over RAW files and using "CR2Thumbnailer" to view the RAW images and export JPGs. But that App doesn't give options for improving the image, so the extra features of this new APP look good. However, one key question: does it generate Lightroom-compatible sidecar files with the edit information so that I can transfer the RAW file and its sidecar file to my PC and view/improve the changes there?

0 upvotes
TSGames
By TSGames (8 months ago)

Maybe giving you the answer to this as the main-developer of this app ;)

No, the edit-options for sidecar files are not compatible with Lightroom. Some of the values will transfer, but the results look different. Why? For 2 simple reasons:
- Adobe uses algorithms they don't share (which is reasonable), so we can't get exact same results
- We offer some tools (like the lasso or layer-based Curves) which LR doesn't offer

Maybe the good news anyway, Ratings and so one will transfer just fine :)

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Jeff Peterman
By Jeff Peterman (8 months ago)

OK, if at least some will transfer, including ratings, that could be useful. This would allow for quick basic processing on the tablet (enough to get a good idea of the image), plus adding tags for the location, etc., and then the detailed work could be done in Lightroom once the files are copied to a PC.

0 upvotes
balios
By balios (8 months ago)

RAW processing on my phone/tablet for a single payment of $9?

vs $99 per year to rent similar software from Adobe?

And the winner is....

5 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (8 months ago)

Just to play devil's advocate: There is such a thing as bad raw extraction software, even stuff you have to pay for on a Mac or PC, see for example Silkypix.

But right, all other things being equal: Adobe is being preposterous and belying the claims about LR remaining as a perpetual license.

0 upvotes
NetMage
By NetMage (8 months ago)

A bit early to make that judgement on an unreleased product.

0 upvotes
Raw Jaw
By Raw Jaw (8 months ago)

I have been using Photo Mate R2 for a few months now.
Well woth the money.
As a R+J shooter it saved me on a few occasions with High Light Recovery,
Surprised the reviewer makes no mention of Eye-Fi cards, which I use daily and which transfer Raw files to my Nexus 7 very quickly.
Before using Photo Mate R2 I usually copy the files from my eye-fi folder to a new folder specific to the shoot for easier file handling.
I then rate my files with 1 to 5 stars which mean to me: garbage, could be, needs hdr, as is, deadline (1 to 5 stars),
Then working my files is fast and easy.

I highly recommend the App and the Eye-fi card.

For deadline field work and personal shooting it is great.

For any other end use I go on my Laptop and my 'PC' workflow.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Henry 3 Dogg
By Henry 3 Dogg (8 months ago)

"However, until fairly recently tablets have not really been an option for those photographers who prefer to capture their images in Raw format."

From the introduction of the original iPad, iPads have had raw processing built in.

Here is an article from 2010 explaining use of RAW images on Mac

http://www.macworld.com/article/1151911/cameraconnection_workflow.html

0 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (8 months ago)

The article you've linked describes how you can view , but not edit and process, Raw files on the iPad. For this the iPad almost certainly displays the JPEG that is normally embedded into all raw files for exactly that purpose. Photo Mate displays and lets you edit and process the actual Raw file which is a totally different kettle of fish.

9 upvotes
technic
By technic (8 months ago)

Maybe interesting if you absolutely must do some RAW processing on the go, but apart from that ... doesn't make sense with current tablet technology and I don't see that changing soon.

Tablets are viewing, browsing, presentation, communication devices. I'd rather see software that can quickly find suitable images among all images that are present on the device, based on a few keywords, and present them to the viewer. The only way to do that now AFAIK is to have a website with all your images and indexing software, and access that through internet. Not very attractive for several reasons ... Or use a Win 8.1 tablet with full Lightroom (gets expensive ...).

Maybe Adobe will make something like that with the new Lightroom mobile?

0 upvotes
HubertChen
By HubertChen (8 months ago)

Thank you for this review. I am more interested in what Library Photo Editing function this application has. E.g. can you compare two images side by side and pick a candidate, then keep the candidate and compare to the next image in the series and then keep doing it until you have found the best image of a series of same images?

This part seems to be missing. I would use such an app when travelling. I would ingest the shooting of the day and then edit down the keeper and delete the images that did not made the cut. RAW editing I would do later in Lightroom on my Desktop.

Posts from anybody who knows the answer to this app or who uses another app with this workflow are highly appreciated!

0 upvotes
TSGames
By TSGames (8 months ago)

You have side-by-side comparision and while you do comparision, you can rate or label the candidates. This should help you find the best image later one. You can switch any of the images, so you can always "keep" the best image as a reference.

0 upvotes
HubertChen
By HubertChen (8 months ago)

@ TSGames
Thanks. This is what I am looking for. Last question. Can I zoom in during the side by side comparison. I shoot a lot with prime lenses wide open and I shoot always several pictures in a series and then choose the one with the best focus. In Lightroom this is a snap with side by side comparison, zoom in and then scroll with both images to be locked in scrolling simultaneously. If this works, count me in :-)

0 upvotes
buginarug
By buginarug (8 months ago)

IPTC? Without IPTC captioning the program is of little use to pros. Does it have it or not? Please to those who review high end photo apps please let us know if IPTC is a program feature.

0 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (8 months ago)

How about a comparisoto with RAW Vision? It looks intriguing, Photo Mate is hardly the only RAW processor on the Play market... I haven't tried it because I haven't had the time and the 15 min limit is hardly enough time but maybe Connect could look into it? I had suggested a look at both these apps months ago...

0 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (8 months ago)

A discussion on how to get RAW files unto an Android device (particularly without a PC) would also be prudent, not everyone's aware of USB OTG and even fewer are aware of how flexible it is: you can go direct from camera to mobile device, card reader to mobile device, and there's keychain sized even micro USB OTG microSD readers... Some devices (like the Nexus line) might require a extra app like Nexus Media Importer etc to mount the card/camera. Wifi would absolutely not work for this since I'm not available of any app that imports RAW over ad-hoc wifi connections to cameras, I'm sure it'll happen eventually tho.

0 upvotes
VladimirV
By VladimirV (8 months ago)

if you use an Eye-Fi card you can tell it to copy the RAW files over Wifi to your device of choice, Android and iOS or Windows and so on. Easy to get the files across like this but easiest is a USB OTG cable as its faster and more convenient.

Good review though and I am glad this great app has been reviewed so ore people know about it. have been using it for ages while travelling with my Nexus 7 and it works great. Now I wish there would be one like this in the Windows 8 store to use with touch screen only instead of having to use the Desktop for everything.

0 upvotes
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (8 months ago)

Nexus Media Importer is not required, if all you need is to transfer images.
In fact you can use one of many OTG apps to access or import USB media. I use StickMount which is free, but requires root (as do some of the other OTG apps). Nexus Media Importer ( not free) does not.

0 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (8 months ago)

Didn't know Eyefi could actually backup RAW; that's neat, tho as you alluded to, USB is definitely gonna be faster... At least until we get 802.11AC speeds out of very small embedded wifi solutions. At some point the flash media becomes the bottleneck either way.

I suggested Nexus Media Importer because I was somewhat familiar with it, didn't even remember it's a paid app... All my devices are rooted and they're all Nexus right now so I just use Stickmount as well, on recent HTC/Samsung phones you don't even need an extra app, external media mounts on it's own and off you go with any file explorer, etc.

I'm sure there's free alternatives though, some of the file managers have even incorporated that kinda functionality...

0 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (8 months ago)

I had a look at Raw vision before I started writing about Photo Mate but as its name implies you can currently only view but not edit raw files.

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (8 months ago)

Ah, at the time I glossed a bit over the details and probably assumed that if both could export JPEGs they both must've had basic editing. I still wouldn't mind an in depth look at to see if it does RAW navigating/viewing any better thanPhoto Mate (like actual side by sides not using the preview JPEG etc). Thanks for this article btw! Not sure I said it earlier.

1 upvote
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (8 months ago)

You're welcome! Glad, you've found it useful :)

0 upvotes
martink3S04
By martink3S04 (8 months ago)

I have and use this program on my Nexus 7 all the time- it is the one truely killer-app for me. Not that the results are necessarily perfect, but it does give me a good feel for just how much headroom I will have to work with on DXO later on when I get back home (I go on pretty long trips and don't bring a full-sized laptop).

0 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (8 months ago)

Wonderful!
This is going to be a hit...

0 upvotes
udris
By udris (8 months ago)

Good to see more players in the game

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Tonio Loewald
By Tonio Loewald (8 months ago)

Ever heard of Photogene on the iPad?

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/photogene-4/id363448251?mt=8

There are at least two other RAW converters for the iPad.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (8 months ago)

"Photo Mate R2 is the only fully-fledged Raw converter for Android we are currently aware of."

Do iPads have card slots, do iPads have micro USB ports?

4 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (8 months ago)

Yes, they do have a card slot should you choose to purchase it as well as a USB port. Besides, I don't think the OP was trying to start an Android vs. iOS battle.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
udris
By udris (8 months ago)

Why not a Android vs. iOS vs ultrabook and have some real battle and depart from the articles intent completely

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (8 months ago)

howardroark:

iPads have USB ports? Well sort of if you go thru iTunes on you Windows or Mac computer. So not exactly. (Here I'm plenty aware of SynciOS.)

Then I suggest you read some of the B+H reviews of the SD card reader that can be plugged into iOS devices.

Why bring up an iPad? There's no iOS version of this software. So yeah the OP wanted to called attention to something ostensibly better with an iPad.

0 upvotes
udris
By udris (8 months ago)

NFC and wifi rule the roost these days and are integrated in most new cameras

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
unknown member
By (unknown member) (8 months ago)

Please, whoever is in charge, delete my posts here. I always regret saying anything to people who are always more right. No matter what one says there is always another level of detail that makes someone else more right. I don't want to play this game.
I totally dig my SD card reader for my iPad, by the way. Works like a charm.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (8 months ago)

howardroark:

I’m glad you report that: “I totally dig my SD card reader for my iPad, by the way. Works like a charm.”

The number of bad reviews had put me off the iSD gear.

The point remains that the iPad doesn’t really have a USB port. And that indeed the OP clearly raised a point about the iPad on a comments forum about an Android device running Android only raw extraction software, also the only Android raw extraction software. Not one of those points is really another level of detail.

Apple’s choice to limit the functionality of the iPad is both a strength (can’t go down too many rabbit holes) and a weakness (eg clearing Safari’s cache + browsing history is convoluted).

0 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (8 months ago)

yes, haven't had a chance to try any of them yet...that might be one for another article :)

0 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (8 months ago)

iOS vs Android aside... Wifi and NFC has no bearing on this, I don't know of any camera/wifi app that will let you transfer RAW files directly to an Android device. Don't get me wrong, I really like stuff like Panasonic's/Sony's/Olympus' Wifi/NFC implementation, makes for quick sharing of JPEGs...

The way to dealing with RAW files on Photo Mate would be a USB OTG cable, either micro USB at both ends for direct camera connections or micro to female full size for plugging in an SD reader etc. I've no clue how well the card reader for iOS devices works, I'm sure there's some additional limitations but as long as an app can get access to the RAW files they should be no less capable.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (8 months ago)

Impulses:

Well I'm pretty sure that the Samsung Galaxy NX can move raws over wifi via software like DropBox and likely NFC too. But I know that's an outlier and has other drawbacks.

0 upvotes
DavidWhittley
By DavidWhittley (8 months ago)

The earlier version of this application was called PhotoMatePro and it worked on my Galaxy Note II despite it being designed for tablets.
Once last thing. Images can be quickly imported directly from most modern cameras using a simple (and very cheap) OTG usb cable.
After connecting my Fujifilm x100s and powering up, jpegs can be viewed directly in the stock gallery application and imported with a simple click. Raw files will be opened in PhotoMatePro. Finally PhotoMatePro and I assume this app are great for improving jpegs.

1 upvote
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (8 months ago)

thanks, the OTG cable is good advice...I did not know that's an option. So you open the files from the camera and also save the converted versions on the camera's memory card?

1 upvote
Impulses
By Impulses (8 months ago)

Either or, once the camera (via a micro to micro OTG cable, less common but still cheap) or the card (via a micro to full female cable + reader) is connected to the tablet/phone, it's just another storage location... Just like internal storage or a micro card inserted into the tablet.

It would be completely up to the app (and yourself) where exported or edited files are saved and whether you'd copy the files over previous to working on them. The latter would probably make sense because even tough mobile device NAND controllers aren't all that fast, they're getting faster every year and will eventually obliterate a card's own controller when it comes to random access of smaller file blocks (edits, loading individual files, etc).

We're already seeing news of mobile devices moving on from eMMC controllers (similar to what's on removable media) to UFS 2.0 which should greatly help matters (Qualcomm & Toshiba will apparently be mass producing them this year). Currently this is probably as much of a bottleneck as raw processing power on the CPU's part.

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (8 months ago)

Meh, i will stick with my laptop PC thanks; tablets are best left for media consumption or gaming. I also dont need to have the NSA snooping on my photos via the backdoors that Google built into Android.

2 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (8 months ago)

Mhh, you don;t use any Google services on your PC I take it? ;)

3 upvotes
tunitowen
By tunitowen (8 months ago)

Time to take the tin foil hat off my friend :)

4 upvotes
LauP
By LauP (8 months ago)

Unlike the backdoors in Windows/OSX/Linux?

1 upvote
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (8 months ago)

NSA could snoop anyones pc/laptop/tablet even if ones computer is fully offline (disconnected from the web or conventional wifi network) unbeknownst to anyone!

http://swampland.time.com/2014/01/15/the-nsa-is-even-spying-on-computers-that-arent-online

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/15/us/nsa-effort-pries-open-computers-not-connected-to-internet.html

http://www.nrc.nl/nieuws/2013/11/23/nsa-infected-50000-computer-networks-with-malicious-software

http://m.spiegel.de/international/world/a-940994.html

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 13 minutes after posting
1 upvote
PeakAction
By PeakAction (8 months ago)

Er... The NSA has back doors into everything. They have back doors into front doors...

Comment edited 11 seconds after posting
1 upvote
lock
By lock (8 months ago)

They don't need doors at all...

0 upvotes
Total comments: 76
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