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Android was first designed for cameras

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Andy Rubin, co-founder of Android, claims that the popular mobile operating system was originally designed for digital cameras, not phones. In an interview published by PC World, Rubin said that the original concept, as pitched to investors back in 2004, was for "a camera platform with a cloud portion for storing images online." By the time Google acquired Android in 2005, however, the plan had changed and the os soon became popular for powering smartphones and tablets. Read the full story on Dpreview.com. 

Comments

Total comments: 11
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Apr 19, 2013)

This does not chime with the reveals made during the Sun-Google lawsuit over Java: There, early Android prototyping showed a Blackberry copycat...

0 upvotes
robogobo
By robogobo (Apr 18, 2013)

...thanks to an advantageous position on Apple's board.

0 upvotes
wansai
By wansai (Apr 18, 2013)

It's a good thing too. Android as an OS is pretty poor as a camera OS. It requires expensive components to run properly and it eats through battery at a fast pace.

Look at the Samsung camera. Lots of features and online components but really as a camera, it's pretty subpar for what it is (a camera).

Most of the cost of that camera is from the components necessary to just run android and then, it only takes a few hundred shots maybe. Compared to a dedicated camera like the Nex 3N at $499 brand new which takes... wait for it... 1400 shots!

It may have been designed for cameras but it certainly wasn't suited to be a camera software, nor were camera guys working on it; that much is apparent.

Comment edited 14 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Omexis
By Omexis (Apr 18, 2013)

Where are you getting your facts from??

Comment edited 44 seconds after posting
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Azurael
By Azurael (Apr 19, 2013)

Ahh, the Galaxy Camera isn't very good... But then, neither is the WB850, which is the same camera without the Galaxy S4 glued to it. I don't think it's Android's fault that Samsung can't make a decent compact camera. It's not like Nikon's effort is any good photographically either. Maybe the Polaroid as-made-by-a-random-Chinese-company Micro 4/3rds effort will be better. That is, if it's real?

0 upvotes
joe6pack
By joe6pack (Apr 17, 2013)

Am I missing something? My ICS phone's stock camera app still cannot upload to the cloud.

0 upvotes
Goodmeme
By Goodmeme (Apr 22, 2013)

Yes you are indeed missing something!!! You need to just download an app and make it sync / back them up . e.g. dropbox.

As for storing them directly to the cloud from the stock camera app, I don't know.

Google's own equivalent of Dropbox is called Google Drive.

Edited to add: If you set up shared network folders e.g. on a windows pc, then you can use an app called Sweet Home to backup photos and videos when you plug your phone in and when it is connected to the home wifi. ES file explorer will let you copy paste swap and drop files between pc and phone using wifi or ftp as well. I've been using sweet home and es file explorer for months and haven't had to wire the phone to a computer at all.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
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xarcex
By xarcex (Apr 17, 2013)

As an Android user, I think this is quite funny because Android's biggest problem, apart from its fragmentation, is the camera/photo quality :) :(

0 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (Apr 17, 2013)

If there is a problem it is not an Android problem but a device manufacturer problem. Some Android devices have great cameras, others have really good ones. Camera hardware and API and down to the individual phone and have not got anything to do with Android as an OS.

0 upvotes
xarcex
By xarcex (Apr 17, 2013)

True.

0 upvotes
ptodd
By ptodd (Apr 19, 2013)

So really it's a subset of the fragmentation problem.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 11
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