mobile photography technology, culture and community
www.dpreview.com

Connect smartphone reviews are written with the needs of photographers in mind. We focus on camera features, performance and image quality.

Apple iPhone 5s Product Images
1 / 6
Image 1
Image 1
Image 2
Image 3
Image 4
Image 5
Image 6

Apple’s iPhone line arguably launched both the mass-market smartphone era and the practice of what we now call mobile photography. The iPhone 5s sees the continued refinement of that line, with little exterior change to differentiate it from its predecessor but a lot of new stuff going on under the hood. 

The 5s follows the recent pattern of Apple’s “S” releases, with internal upgrades that promise improved performance and new features. In this case, the 5s packs a more powerful processor, a fingerprint reader and a fresh operating system (iPhone 4 and later models also get the OS upgrade). Most relevant for the mobile photographer, Apple has enhanced the camera with a slightly larger sensor (1/3 vs 1/3.2 inch), an innovative flash design, a fast burst mode and a few new software features.

Apple remains the only company whose product launches are widely considered international news, but the 5s finds itself facing unprecedented competition from a nuanced menu of Android handsets and serious imaging innovation in the Windows Phone camp courtesy of Nokia. We put Apple’s flagship through its photographic paces to see how it holds up against the rest. 

Key Photographic / Video Specifications

  • 8 megapixel 1/3-inch sensor, 1.5 micron photosites
  • Five-element 30mm equivalent F2.2 lens
  • Color temperature-matching dual LED flash
  • 1080p 30fps video recording
  • 720p 120fps slow-motion video recording
  • 1.2MP front camera
  • Panorama mode with dynamic exposure
  • Automatic best-image selection in single shot mode
  • Image-blending stabilization
  • 10 fps burst mode
  • HDR mode

Other Specifications

  • A7 dual-core 64-bit processor
  • iOS 7 
  • 4-inch 1136x640 326 ppi display
  • Fingerprint reader
  • 16, 32, or 64GB internal storage

Our 11-page review

We've considered every aspect of the iPhone 5s camera, with the photographer in mind. We examined the user interface of the native camera app and its special features. We experimented with the camera's performance when taking stills and video, and had a play with the device's many special feature modes. Click any of the links below for more information of specific functions and continue to our conclusion for a final summary of our findings.

Comments

Total comments: 152
jedics
By jedics (4 months ago)

I never seem to see reviews criticize the double flash needed, one to focus one to take the shot. In nearly every case you get a photo of people squinting from the first flash.

just bring back the focusing lamp already

0 upvotes
Maddeedog
By Maddeedog (6 months ago)

Why does the camera on myiphone5s "lock" after I've taken only a couple of pics? I have to turn it completely off before I can continue taking pics....

0 upvotes
srados
By srados (9 months ago)

haters will hate...I do not have 5s but 4s is still taking decent pictures.

0 upvotes
papa natas
By papa natas (7 months ago)

Well, I've been taken indecent pictures and they look great too!!

1 upvote
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (10 months ago)

A camera with a sensor 10x smaller than Nokia 808 placed 2nd? Are they hallucinating? Without the side-by-side comparison of photos, that DX0Mark should not be taken seriously.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
vv50
By vv50 (10 months ago)

D X O, not D X zero. and the 5S is trailing behind the 808 simply because there's no entry for the xperia z or 1020 yet.

2 upvotes
baozebub
By baozebub (10 months ago)

Usually when I go to tech sites, there is always an anti-Apple army who posts unrelated comments just because they hate Apple. I hadn't expected it here.

So if I have an iPhone, and like taking pics, and go to this site to read the review, maybe hoping to learn something or to validate my choice, I would inevitably get to the comments where people say Apple is the worst camera in the world?

What's up with that? If you've got a Samsung or Nokia, then take your pics and upload them, so the whole world will know that there are other phones that take great pics. But quit talking trash about a camera that a lot of people own and love. We don't need your stupid Apple hate/jealousy/frustration on every freaking comment page.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
10 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

You could have just stated "iPhone is the best.", as you've did over at http://connect.dpreview.com/post/5349132175/nat-geo-5s-scotland

Then, we would have known right at the beginning you're an Apple fanboy without having to read your entire comment.

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
8 upvotes
myatthwin
By myatthwin (10 months ago)

I suppose you don't have an iPhone 5s; perhaps a Samsung?

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

myatthwin, do you mean me?

0 upvotes
keeponkeepingon
By keeponkeepingon (10 months ago)

I've got an 808, arguably the best camera with the biggest sensor in a phone in existence.

While I often love the ouput of the camera on the 808 it can be frustratingly slow to use that camera.

Unfortunately the modern dpreview reviews do little to inform me as to how the speed of the camera/app in my phone (or any other phone) objectively compares to other phones.

I really miss phill's old timing section in his reviews. While he did not do much of a comparison he provided the data to let me compare amongst the various phones of the era :

Example:
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/casioz750/4

It would be great if you had something similar for connect phone reviews but perhaps updated for smart phones. (maybe add time to email to time to first shot or something?).

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (10 months ago)

the review does describe shot to shot times, and burst speeds available, plus it even describes the difference between the 4s camera app ,vs the 5s.

1 upvote
Gryfster
By Gryfster (10 months ago)

Have to agree with Bigley, the shot to shot time on the Lumia 1020 as reported by dpreview was a big factor on me passing on the phone.

1 upvote
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (10 months ago)

yes 1 frame every 3 seconds is a little slow on th 1020 when you want a quality over sampled image and burst speed to go with it. The 808 is a little faster at 1 frame per second, but by far from the iPhone 5s with an amazing 10 fps!

1 upvote
ryanshoots
By ryanshoots (10 months ago)

The 4S was better than the 5. Maybe the 5S got back to the 4S level.

0 upvotes
Breitling
By Breitling (10 months ago)

what?

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

He may have meant the PurpleView problem?

Nevertheless, I disagree. Most of the time, it's not an issue.

1 upvote
Woodlink
By Woodlink (10 months ago)

bigger pixels....ugh

0 upvotes
kriztian
By kriztian (10 months ago)

Why don´t you all have a look at this shootout between iphone 5s and lumia 1020. http://www.businessinsider.com/iphone-camera-compared-to-nokia-1020-2013-9
It´s redicoulous to see how some people try to elevate the iphone 5 S when its not deserved. There are practically no change at all in pic-quality from iphone 5

4 upvotes
instamatic
By instamatic (10 months ago)

Because you know, iPhone can do everyday tasks that one expects from a smartphone very well and very smoothly with very little bad surprises, and that includes taking sufficiently nice photos that have excellent contrast and color. So iPhone is liked because it's pleasing to use and helps people to get things done. And that's it's value. Way too many people and reviewers also compare iPhone to other phones by looking at technical specifications, but this is totally wrong way to compare them. Few if any actually compare them on the ability and ease of getting things done by using them.

9 upvotes
vFunct
By vFunct (10 months ago)

What good is a good camera if the photos are never seen?

The 1020 has a great camera, but it's rather useless if it doesn't include the apps. And, these days, Instagram is the most important photo app. This is especially the case for pros, since every client wants their photos posted on their Instagram page.

Because of the lack of apps, you have to carry a separate device to post the photos. In that case, you might as well carry a Fuji X100s or any other non Camera phone.

Comment edited 35 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
wansai
By wansai (10 months ago)

Vfunct, just stop it already. Ppl have explained endlessly about choices of apps you can use for WP. There's a bunch of instagram apps as well as very good camera apps in general.

this is not an issue.

3 upvotes
RC
By RC (10 months ago)

I have both, the Lumia 1020 and the iPhone 5S. The Lumia does not stand up to it's expectations, I was deeply disappointed. Only good thing about the Lumia: The lossless zoom, which allows to make digital zoom photos without actually losing quality. Everything else is, how to put it, below 5S level. The Xenon flash of the Lumia is brighter but this doesn't mean the photos look better, on the contrary. Overall, the 5S camera is snappier, amazingly fast (burst mode) and takes better snapshot photos. Like it or not.

4 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (10 months ago)

the 1020 should have kept the 808's camera hardware and implemented windows phones instead of redesigning the camera.. I think high quality beats OIS for daylight shooting, and by night, just use the xenon flash

0 upvotes
Infms
By Infms (10 months ago)

@vFunct Instagram is the most important camera app? DPReview's readership standard has clearly declined.

1 upvote
Luis Augusto
By Luis Augusto (9 months ago)

Enjoy your 3 seconds lag between shots. The iPhone 5S takes 30 pictures in the same time frame.

The Lumia 1020 image quality is undoubtedly the best, but it fails in many other ways.

0 upvotes
wansai
By wansai (10 months ago)

Phone cameras have come a long way but in general have still fallen short of examples set out by Nokia's 808. You get more tricks and doodads but I think we have a few generations yet before any single contender can match Nokia's last great hoorah.

I definitely consider these usable for casual shots.

for your flash example, the dual led seems to produce overly red tones, like too much saturation in the magenta. Ideally, I would think it would be closer to between the single flash and the dual flash.

anyone know why xenon flash is so difficult to get on phones? The 925's xenon flash is really useful. One would think adding a single xenon is both cheaper and easier to manufacture than 2 led??

0 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (10 months ago)

I think you meant 928. The 925 does not have a xenon flash.

Xenon is not cheaper than LED, as it requires a high voltage discharge which requires a descent capacitor. Also the xenon flash has to sync with the phone cameras shutter, which takes timing, etc.

0 upvotes
Etienne Jacquemart
By Etienne Jacquemart (10 months ago)

I'm nearly sure slow motion is not a real 720p. It's probably some kind of VGA upsampled. You can easily check by yourself : shoot a simple static video in slo-mo. Than, do the same with the front camera, which records also in 720p. Normally, the back camera should have better resolution. This is just the contrary. The slow motion movie is terribly aliased, and lacks A LOT of details compared to the front camera movie (both viewed in full res on a computer screen). To get the same perceived definition, you have to reduce your frame considerably on the slo-mo movie. I really think Apple is cheating on this one. Dear DP Review, could you investigate further?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

It IS not 720p120 but half of that, resolution-wise: effectively 640*360. Apple is cheating, to put it mildly. As has also been explained in my comment below:

Citation from the article: "Overall, the new slow motion feature is a lot of fun, and the video quality of the actual file is excellent."

Are you absolutely sure about this? Based on my examining the currently available footage, it seems the 5s uses pixel binning in the 720p120 mode (as does the iPhone5 in 720p60 - see http://www.iphonelife.com/blog/87/will-ios7-indeed-support-60fps-video-recording-yes-it-will ; the final iOS7 works in exactly the same way as beta2), effectively reducing the sensor's input resolution to 360p. If it's indeed binning (which I think is pretty certain) the video quality, resolution-wise, is a far cry away from HD resolution or even that of the LG G2's 1080p60 mode, which also produces somewhat lower resolution in the 60 fps mode than in the regular 30p one...

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"It IS not 720p120 but half of that, resolution-wise: effectively 640*360. Apple is cheating, to put it mildly."

Nevertheless, Apple are calling the slow-mo mode "HD", for example in their official video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kK0_OVn_uxA , at 2:04:

"A new slow motion feature lets you shoot HD video at a 120 frames per second"

Too bad it's not HD at all.

1 upvote
Mister J
By Mister J (10 months ago)

Apple's (free) iMovie software makes the iP5s ideal for videomakers, especially if, like me, you shoot quickie in-the-field stuff for uploading.

It feels surprisingly lighter than the iP4s too, and thankfully retains the flat-sided design, so you can lay it on a table for rock-steady results.

Well worth the upgrade I reckon.

2 upvotes
Henrikw
By Henrikw (10 months ago)

Conclusion - if you consider upgrading from the 5 to 5s because of the camera - don't bother. The difference is minuscule and will make absolutely zero difference to what is average smartphone picture quality.
Personally, I was hoping the camera improvements would have a bigger impact on the quality, but this reviews makes me completely comfortable sticking to my 5.
Could not care less about the stronger flash (direct flash looks awful regardless) finger print scanner and extra processor speed - no apps are utilising the full potential of the 5 yet anyway.
So waiting for the 6

4 upvotes
bigley Ling
By bigley Ling (10 months ago)

The finger print sensor on the 5s seems like fun though

0 upvotes
baozebub
By baozebub (10 months ago)

Upgraded from my 5. Indoor shots look better and sharper. I'm getting fewer blurs. Considering I don't really know the true quality of a phone pic until it's on a computer monitor, this makes me feel much better about those snapshots I or someone else take.

Fingerprint sensor is great. I'm expecting good things out of this in the coming months.

Back in the pre-iPhone days, this yearly level of improvement was unheard of.

1 upvote
matty_boy
By matty_boy (10 months ago)

Ive never been a fan of connect, its sits in an awkard no-mans land between serious photography and gadgetry, not really knowing what it should be and sometimes being guilty of very tenuous photographic links to some technology.

I promise i will never visit this site again, having read this review that lists, amongst the bad.

"Less detail in good light than some higher-res sensors"

there it is, insight at its lazy worst - bordering on tautology. And what does 'smallish screen' really add to this, surely (given the 4" size of the iPhone screen being larger than most dedicated cameras) all SLRs and compacts barring the frankly silly galaxy camera, should also have 'smallish screen' listed as a 'bad'. terrible fence sitting review ruined by the awful lazy conclusion

5 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"I promise i will never visit this site again, having read this review that lists, amongst the bad.

"Less detail in good light than some higher-res sensors"

there it is, insight at its lazy worst - bordering on tautology."

You're wrong. It's a well-known fact higher megapixel count doesn't necessarily equal higher detail level. In some cases, the opposite is true, as can easily be seen in the LG G2 shots above, which delivers considerably less detail than even the iPhone 5, let alone the 5s. (I've scrutinized it too.) This is because of the higher NR and the accompanying detail loss.

However, even in the non-camera-centric phone category (most importantly: the GS4) there are phones that do deliver somewhat better detail level than even the 5s.

That is, with the 5s, it's NOT true it can beat every other smartphone. It can't - it's "only" on par with the best non-Nokia ones.

Comment edited 12 seconds after posting
1 upvote
tompabes2
By tompabes2 (10 months ago)

All your words can be summarized with: I'm an Apple fanboy, and I'm angry because you didn't say that the iphone is magical.

9 upvotes
supeyugin1
By supeyugin1 (10 months ago)

All high end camera phones have bigger screen than iPhone: Galaxy S4 zoom - 4.3", Nokia 1020 - 4.5", not to mention Galaxy Camera (4.8") and Galaxy NX (4.8"), but those are not phones anyway.

1 upvote
matty_boy
By matty_boy (10 months ago)

@tompabes2 firstly, I lied, I visited again - it happens i hope you can handle that.. Secondly fools rush in .. I am actually in the market for a camera phone at the moment, out of contract etc. aside from the self-flagilation thats seems to be occuring re the new lumia (which actually does look amazing) i was interested in the iPhone as ive seen many good shots with it and it is popular. My only issue (as documented in my comment) is that the review contains pros and cons that are worthless, that could quite easily come from a pro/anti apple troll (such as yourself) in that they are meaningless e.g. iphone screen is bigger than that on any compact other than silly ones, and regardless of some people's argument that resolution doesn't necessarily equal more detail - i accept that but the wording is such that there is no doubt. The 'con' in this case is that higher resolution cameras have greater resolution. The review is as poor as your assumptions tompabes2 and yes, you did rush in...

0 upvotes
Gryfster
By Gryfster (10 months ago)

@matty_boy dpreview has for a long time stated very clearly that both the rating and "pros and cons" are in comparison to other photographic devices in the same class. So mid-class rangefinder CSC will compare a Panasonic GX1 to a Sony NEX-5 to a Olympus E-PL3. Similarly for FF cameras.

It doesn't make much sense to compare pros and cons of phone screens to a dedicated camera. I mean if you do that then all cameraphones will score 0.5 out of 10 because they look like crap compared to a Nikon 800E.

So your point "e.g. iphone screen is bigger than that on any compact other than silly ones," is meaningless because the image quality of an iphone 5s is not comparable to a mid-range 1/2.3" BSI sensor compact camera.

However compared to other phones the iPhone 5S camera image quality is very good. But its screen is smaller than most of the other camera phones. Ergo dpreview's "pros and cons". Is that logical to you fanboy?

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
magneto shot
By magneto shot (10 months ago)

having used android phones in my sony Acro S and also the Nokia 808. i still went and preferred the iphone.

The reason is that the overall usage is rock solid. Fast to shoot and supports shooting with the headset volume buttons, tons of 3rd party casing and tripod mounting and apps like Hipstamatic/Oggl.

Overall, for mobile photography, its the overall availability of it.
Other phones often lags for no apparent reasons when invoking the camera apps lacks 3rd party accessories like mcam lens etc.

If i wanted the best quality, well, the e-p5 and the nikon d4 would fulfill my needs, but for an everyday "camera with me". Its the iphone.

3 upvotes
instamatic
By instamatic (10 months ago)

Well said. That's exactly what it is.

0 upvotes
RUcrAZ
By RUcrAZ (10 months ago)

Too bad this review, while useful, does not compare the cam with....its competitors. Yes, we know it "takes photos," yes, we know it gets grainy at hi-ISO, but...what about a comparison? For example, "flare" is mentioned, but again, compared to...? (I have a 5-yr old Nokia N95-8G with a 5Mpixel cam, which is fine, except for very bad (in my opinion) flare.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

They did mention it's a bit more prone to lens flare than the competition.

Nevertheless, when it comes to the iPhone 5, I haven't really found lens flare / "PurpleView" a problem, except for panos - see for example the effects of these problems in pano mode at

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9714500622/in/set-72157635518264546

and

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9714487754/in/set-72157635518264546

1 upvote
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (10 months ago)

Isn't it that every NEW model is the best XXXX*phone yet?

What with de title?

* - replace this XXXX with your favorite phone: Lumia, iPhone, etc.

.

3 upvotes
Photato
By Photato (10 months ago)

Is it me or the 5s has issues capturing Reds?
On the other phones the Reds are bright and saturated.
On the 5S, the reds look more like orange.
I was expecting better performance than the 5 or 4s but it isn't.

0 upvotes
Stealthy Ninja
By Stealthy Ninja (10 months ago)

I live in Hong Kong. People here love phones. iPhone 5s/c is really easy to find, just not as popular as they used to be. I mean maybe the Mainland Chinese will buy them up, but locals don't really buy Apple that much anymore.

The other day at a shop 5 people were all buying a Note 3 at the same time. Samsung is by far the most popular brand here.

Nokia and Sony might have better cameras, but those brands aren't very popular.

Is it an American thing to idolise the iPhone? I mean it gets a lot of attention on this site.

4 upvotes
Stealthy Ninja
By Stealthy Ninja (10 months ago)

I should clarify. They buy Apple, just the iPhone isn't as popular as it used to be with nearly everyone owning one.

1 upvote
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

Apple has very strong cult following in the USA, always has (even before the IPhone), and the media does seen to love giving them attention (I imagine it sells, from an ads/clicks point of view)... But I wouldn't say it's an American thing to idolize Apple, at this point Android phone sales far eclipse Apple's in the US (like much of the world)... I wouldn't necessarily say DPR gives them that much more extra attention either, they review most noteworthy flagship phones in very much the same way.

0 upvotes
BeyondPluto
By BeyondPluto (10 months ago)

Samsung sells more total phones, helped by the fact it has numerous models at all price ranges. The iPhone has been the most popular single model (though, now two models). There are more iPhone cameras out there than any other camera in existence. I'd say that makes it pretty relevant to a camera web site.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"I wouldn't necessarily say DPR gives them that much more extra attention either, they review most noteworthy flagship phones in very much the same way."

Yup, as a regular here, I can confirm this. They cover for example Nokia-related news equally thoroughly.

0 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

" Samsung sells more total phones, helped by the fact it has numerous models at all price ranges. The iPhone has been the most popular single model (though, now two models). There are more iPhone cameras out there than any other camera in existence. "

That kinda marketing talk could be ripped straight from an Apple ad... There's always been multiple models, just because they changed the shell of the outgoing model for the first time this year (purely to save costs, which weren't passed forward to the consumer) doesn't change anything. They've been selling the previous one or two models at reduced costs for years now, models that often have distinctly different camera specs.

Clumping all iPhones together and comparing that against any single year model from other OEMs is Apple RDF at it's classic best, trying to obfuscate the fact that they've been losing marketshare and mindshare for a while. It's good PR, fuzzy math. You either draw the line at the OS and compare IPhone numbers vs Android numbers (though that's of little value at DPR), or you'd have to look at specific year models (e.g. IPhone 5c vs SGS3 etc).

Apple's always had a lower end model or two, they were just recycling older hardware whole hog for that purpose before. The only real advantage Samsung (or any other OEM) has in that regard is that they're willing to pursue the sub-$100 on contract market, I'm sure that translates somehow to full off contract prices in places like Europe where paying full price is more common...

Apple will never go after the lowest tier market regardless of what so called analysts would say or hope for... They were similarly calling for a sub-$1K laptop from Apple back during the height of the netbook days and it never materialized. In fact, the only semi-cheap devices Apple sells are the Apple TV and the Mac mini. Even the IPod shuffle is like 2-3x the price of your average SanDisk Clip or whatever.

Apple's always been about selling premium hardware that allows them to charge top dollar and maximize profits, even before the iPhone. Any other endeavors (iTunes, apps, Apple TV) were really born out of the opportunity to sell even more premium hardware (more iPods, phones, tablets). Their whole marketing drive revolves around this, you sell premium products by putting the brand first. Ergo, instilling the kind of group think that tag lines like your post display.

I don't really have a problem with any of it tbh, it's just good marketing in the end... Intel has generally tried to work off a similar principle (albeit with less brilliant marketing, but there's only so much you can do to sell bare silicon on the shoulders of other OEMs). The only time they went after the low end (Atom) was to avoid someone else from grabbing that market and to prevent it from canibalizing their high end (then they let Atom stagnate for 5 years).
Eventually ARM came along and forced Intel to lower profits on certain parts far lower than they ever have (Atom on Win 8 tablets costs OEMs a fraction of what it used to). Eventually that point is gonna come for Apple and what they do then will determine whether they keep their 30%+ market share or whether iOS devices go the way of Macs, either way they'd probably survive.

This is all pretty irrelevant to much of DPR's readers tho. Apple's software policies are their only real turn me off for me, and that's much more relevant for Connect, since mobile photography is increasingly as much about the software used as the device or logo on the back of it.

2 upvotes
Vito R
By Vito R (10 months ago)

It's not fuzzy math, Apple does have the best selling phone - by far.

Apple owns 40% of the US market for smartphones - the next closest competitor is Samsung with 24%. Samsung's share includes the S4/S3/Note 1/2 along with all the other low end phones they sell. Apple sells 3 phones with the most popular being the current gen model. Apple is losing market share was inevitable as they owned the market for 5 years essentially unopposed. Their competition is not Android - as stated they have no interest in competing with $100 (off contract) smartphones. People who buy subsidized on contract overwhelmingly choose Apple.

The fact that only Apple and Samsung are making a profit selling smartphones should tell you something.

0 upvotes
Troy
By Troy (10 months ago)

Hmmmm.... their software policies turn you off?

I've always found their policies to be the most fair in the industry. Apple has provided upgrades at minimum cost, with family packs and has never used. Where other paid $120 for a home version upgrade of windows, Apple charges $29 for a 5 computer family pack activation.

Plus for a person who appreciates design, getting a computer or phone that is CNC milled out of a solid hunk of aluminum with a well designed OS is hard to replace that even for a couple hundred extra bucks

1 upvote
Len_Gee
By Len_Gee (10 months ago)

So for me, no reason to upgrade. My 4s does just fine as a back up imaging device for casual social snapshots.

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (10 months ago)

So lemme guess Nokia should score 10/10 and Galaxy 9/10 and Apple 8/10

1 upvote
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (10 months ago)

Actually, mediocre sensor, lack of manual controls, lousy ergonomics and poor IQ should make the score 6/10. Looking at the score bars, this phone is mediocre at best.

9 upvotes
new boyz
By new boyz (10 months ago)

The best iPhone? Maybe. The best of all? It's from Nokia. You know it's the best of phone cameras when it's better than most compacts. Big sensors rule.

2 upvotes
ABM Barry
By ABM Barry (10 months ago)

Samsung screen, Sony camera module, ...... Whats apple about it apart from the usual high price - sub-standard image quality and the usual itunes lock-in exploitation soft ware.

Then apple will again sue Samsung for using their very own screens!

If you ware a brown cardigan, you probably love being charged by apple for what everyone else gets for free!

7 upvotes
EricWN
By EricWN (10 months ago)

Given your logic everymanufacturer should make hardware and software themselves. That leaves Sony and Samsung in even worse positions, because with your thinking, those folks would not even have an OS at hand.

1 upvote
Soupisgoodfood
By Soupisgoodfood (10 months ago)

Apple design the phone. They design their own chips and the software the runs on it. Who else is doing that? RIM? Certainly not Samsung, Sony, or Nokia.

Nothing sub-standard about the image quality for that type of camera -- Sony make good camera components. And the software side is still better than the competition.

None of the other phones are free off-contract and most decent software still costs money no matter what platform you're on. So I don't understand what you're on about there.

0 upvotes
tbcass
By tbcass (10 months ago)

Lets be honest. If you are a photographer used to using good cameras, the iPhone, or any phone for that matter, sucks big time as a camera. A royal POS.

9 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (10 months ago)

Lets be honest, YOU don't have a clue.

12 upvotes
photo_rb
By photo_rb (10 months ago)

Years ago, I used to carry a little Rollei 35 film camera around with me all the time. I'll bet the iPhone quality blows it away.

1 upvote
Mister J
By Mister J (10 months ago)

Phone cams don't pretend to compete with high-end DSLRs, but they are really useful as the 'camera that's always in your pocket.'

With good light, I can make saleable prints from my iP4s up to A3+ on my Epson R3000. This is tweaking through Photoshop, exporting at 150dpi.

(Edited for spelling)

Comment edited 32 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
vadims
By vadims (10 months ago)

> iPhone, or any phone for that matter, sucks big time as a camera

Well, the question of which phone sucks the least remains...

0 upvotes
Henrik Herranen
By Henrik Herranen (10 months ago)

"Apple’s iPhone line arguably launched both the mass-market smartphone era and the practice of what we now call mobile photography."

This might have been true in the United States, the only market in the world where Nokia wasn't dominant when Apple's first smartphone launched. Everywhere else Nokia mobile camera smartphones outsold Apple's iPhones until just two years ago, not to even speak of Nokia's camera featurephones and other manufacturers phones.

So yes, this claim is quite arguable.

Comment edited 14 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (10 months ago)

The claim is probably valid in that while cameras have existed on phones long before the iPhone, none of those cameras sparked an actual movement that caused even some legitimate and traditional photographers to explore and specialize in. This was helped by the new economy of iPhone camera apps.

All of those other phones you cited...none of them were able to launch anything on the scale of Instagram. That is I think the point here.

4 upvotes
CyberAngel
By CyberAngel (10 months ago)

I got it!
I finally get what "i" stands for...
iNSTASUCK

3 upvotes
Serenity Now
By Serenity Now (10 months ago)

I loved my Nokia candy bar phones...but let's get real. The is NOTHING misleading or inaccurate about DPRs comment. Nokia's foray into smartphones was an unmitigated disaster that took them from supremacy to the edge of oblivion. Apple started it. Get over it.

4 upvotes
Gryfster
By Gryfster (10 months ago)

In the US, Nokia were dumb candybar phones. In the EU, Nokia was heavily pushing the N95 with a 5 MP camera, LED flash and GPS. This was at the same time that the iphone had a 2MP fixed focus and "fake" GPS using cell tower triangulation.

It didn't have a capacitive touchscreen and it wasn't as easy to use (iOS was significantly better than Symbian 3 from a UI perspective) BUT from a photography perspective Nokia were considerably ahead in 2007.

Comment edited 53 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"BUT from a photography perspective Nokia were considerably ahead in 2007."

... and ever since, apart from some specific areas like sweep panos...

0 upvotes
wansai
By wansai (10 months ago)

SerenityNow,

you shouldn't try to sound so sure of yourself when expressing your opinion. Often opinions have a way of obstructing facts.

Nokia most certainly started mobile photography. Ppl were using it by the millions. Back then there weren't oodles of sharing options. You had flikr, which is generally for pros.

Nokia's foray into smartphones was not, as you stated, an unmitigated disaster. They created the market long before the iPhone. They defined what smartphones do. in many ways phones like iPhone and WP still haven't caught up with Nokias version despite bearing signifgantly better hardware and software.

take a chill pill. Learning history combats ignorance.

1 upvote
Serenity Now
By Serenity Now (10 months ago)

And were so good they are now owned by Microsoft?!?!
A better camera does not a better phone make. Integration and interface to a PHONE is where Apple changed the game. Plenty have adapted and caught up since and for some surpassed. So be it. Until the next manufacturer changes the game - starting this game will be Apple's legacy.

0 upvotes
Serenity Now
By Serenity Now (10 months ago)

Wansai,

I'm chilled. Where did I say Nokia didn't start mobile photography? I'm not making a claim on behalf of anyone...I'm making an observation based on the response of the market. As for learning history...I'm happy to let history speak for itself.

0 upvotes
Gryfster
By Gryfster (10 months ago)

SerenityNow,

Yes Nokia screwed up. They were complacent and thought they had conquered the market. They made stupid decisions to increase the margin on each phone sold. They didn't invest in new technology. They arrogantly thought that resistive screens were better than capacitive.

However, I see Apple making similar moves now (iPhone 5C is an attempt to make more margin off obsolete hardware and they arroantly refuse to make a bigscreen phone).

These things come in cycles. The point though is that in 2007 Nokia was far ahead in mobile photography (it was far behind in UI design and app development tools). Saying that it was just a dumb phone manufacturer and blindly worshiping the iPhone camera is ignorant.

Comment edited 40 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Serenity Now
By Serenity Now (10 months ago)

Sigh.

Blind worship?

I'm as critical of Apple as I am of any manufacturer and designer. They're in the game - they get criticism and the plaudits. Just as Nokia did in their heyday. Beautiful industrial design.

This discussion is about an editorial comment from DPR which in my opinion remains valid.

Blind worship - ignorance is more commonly expressed by the the serial malcontents who take issue with Apple because they're Apple. Moreover to demean other peoples valid enjoyment of a device because it's...what...popular? That the masses who embraced it are clueless aesthetes?

Long live great design - by anyone determined and talented enough to bring it to market.

0 upvotes
Gryfster
By Gryfster (10 months ago)

@Serenity Now
My apologies for "blind info" crack; I wasn't specific. I was not referring to you, I was referring to Peter Ferenci's "adulation as intro" paragraph.

0 upvotes
itsastickup
By itsastickup (10 months ago)

Most of the cons look like fishing for something negative to say.

"Underexposed video in very low-light conditions"

Not on the evidence of that video. Unless it was actually early evening and much lighter, the video was just right.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

Have you ever shot video with an iPhone? I've been doing that ever since the release of the iPhone 4.

Then, you WOULD know the low-light video performance is significantly worse than that of the stills performance - or, for that matter, cameras (like the Nokia 808 / 1020) doing full sensor oversampling while shooting video.

That's because it, as with most high-Mpixel cameras, uses line skipping when recording video - not only because of the 1/30s shutter speed. Full sensor oversampling (resulting in way better low-light performance - only available on jailbroken devices with the camera hacks I've developed) or binning (actively used by the iPhone in high-speed modes AND if you manually edit the plist files to activate it in other modes) does result in significantly better low-light performance. However, full sensor oversampling is VERY slow (simple resolution-halving binning is much faster).

1 upvote
itsastickup
By itsastickup (10 months ago)

My comment was in reference to 'underexposure' not performance.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"My comment was in reference to 'underexposure' not performance."

Yup, if you meant "Video Sample 2", it's still tolerable - I've shot / seen far darker videos on all HD+-capable iPhone (& iPad) models. However, all HD+ iPhone models do suffer from relative light insensitivity when shooting video because they don't oversample (and, in non-high speed higher-res modes, bin) the sensor - perhaps this is what the author of the article meant. With oversampling (or the simpler and, by the iPhone, already actively used binning), these shots would be far better exposed / brighter. This is what I referred to in my comment.

All in all, the 5s isn't a Nokia 1020 / 808, low light video-shooting wise. Nothing can beat the light gathering abilities of fully oversampled (or, at least, binned) sensors.

Comment edited 29 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

Citation from the article: "HDR modes typically work by taking two or three exposures and blending them into one that has (hopefully) both intact highlights and shadow detail. The blending process often creates ghosting artifacts around moving subjects, limiting the mode to static scenes. Apple appears to have largely beaten this problem, presumably by selecting discrete areas to combine into a single photo rather than blending entire frames."

Nope - it is blending. It's just that the two frames are captured in a very rapid succession - I think during the photodiodes' filling with photons. Therefore, you'll very rarely see artefacts, unlike with the traditional, fully separated shot-stitching approach.

An example shot (iPhone 5, this Summer, shooting a stopped truck from some 10 metres while cycling with about 20 km/h):

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9368690108/in/set-72157634791582799

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

There are definite artefacts to the right of the poles showing the HDR shot is a combination of two frames.

The original (non-HDR) image:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9368689512/in/set-72157634791582799

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (10 months ago)

I wonder why don't you shoot the low-light comparison scene with an independent app which actually allows to set the same shutter speed?

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

Because you can't. In IOS, the camera API is really-really restricted. You simply can't set anything, unless you choose a shutter speed over 1/15s. It's the only way shutter speed setting is possible - but nothing under 1/15s.

See http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52262200 , where, in section "1. Some generic features making this app great", I've elaborated on this question quite a lot more.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (10 months ago)

"Apple’s iPhone line arguably launched both the mass-market smartphone era "

You mean all those tens (if not hundreds) of millions smartphones sold before the first iPhone were not mass-market? ;) Sheesh.

3 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

Citation from the article: "Overall, the new slow motion feature is a lot of fun, and the video quality of the actual file is excellent."

Are you absolutely sure about this? Based on my examining the currently available footage, it seems the 5s uses pixel binning in the 720p120 mode (as does the iPhone5 in 720p60 - see http://www.iphonelife.com/blog/87/will-ios7-indeed-support-60fps-video-recording-yes-it-will ; the final iOS7 works in exactly the same way as beta2), effectively reducing the sensor's input resolution to 360p. If it's indeed binning (which I think is pretty certain) the video quality, resolution-wise, is a far cry away from HD resolution or even that of the LG G2's 1080p60 mode, which also produces somewhat lower resolution in the 60 fps mode than in the regular 30p one...

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

Citation from the article: "The 5s has a narrower angle of view in video mode than when taking stills, presumably a side effect of its digital video stabilization. Unlike most other phones with digital video stabilization, you can’t turn the feature off on the 5s."

1, Yes, the narrower FoV is *partly* because of the EIS.

2, however, if you do disable EIS for video, the view will still be only 10% wider - and still significantly narrower than in stills or 4:3 standard-res video modes (e.g., 640*480).

3, you *can* disable EIS if you do need a wider FoV - and you definitely should if you, say, shoot on a tripod. FiLMiC Pro allows you to dynamically enable and disable IS. If you don't need IS at all, some cheaper alternatives with IS is disabled (it's OFF all the time):

Camera Awesome (free)
King Camera (free)
BetterCam (free)

More info on all these: http://www.iphonelife.com/blog/87/why-you-may-want-disable-image-stabilization-during-video-recording

1 upvote
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (10 months ago)

All our testing happens with the default camera app in which you cannot disable this feature.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"All our testing happens with the default camera app in which you cannot disable this feature."

Yup. Too bad the default Camera app is really barebones. While the iOS API is really restricted compared to both Android and WP, at least it allows for dis/enabling EIS in third-party apps.

2 upvotes
Houseqatz
By Houseqatz (10 months ago)

it's like everyone forgets that consumers purchase apple products because they, by and large, make the decisions for the consumer.. everything must be approved by apple..

i have a 4s, and it is the last iphone i plan on purchasing.. and while the live fliters are alright, and i dont' mind how their HDR mode works, or the burst.. it's no longer about doing things differently.. that was steve jobs apple.. tim cooks apple want's to compete with other manufacturers.. which is fine, bc he clearly lacks the vision for what apple was, that steve jobs had.

4 upvotes
CyberAngel
By CyberAngel (10 months ago)

I never realized that Jobs was genius
until he passed away
The Apple development stagnated
I'm sure that Jobs would have allowed modern tech:
NFC, OIS, gloves-on-display, even IP67
While the finger-off protection is maybe a gimmick,
the 64-bit is AWESOME !!!

1 upvote
EricWN
By EricWN (10 months ago)

Boy some people never get tired repeating the same "Apple is doomed BS" for decades. Cook excels for over a decade at that company already, he didn't just start there yesterday.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

Citation from the article: "Once you start recording, you get a white button under the record button for taking still images. This is the first iPhone to perform this trick and while it’s a nice feature to have, the images are disappointingly low-res at 2 megapixels. They’re in HD video’s 16:9 aspect ratio."

Not exactly right. The iPhone 5 has also been capable of this since its introduction, even under iOS6.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
1 upvote
DotCom Editor
By DotCom Editor (10 months ago)

"The iPhone 5s, running Apple’s fresh iOS 7, is an excellent phone with a very good camera."

How do you know that? Did you test how well the 5s functions as a TELEPHONE?

1 upvote
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (10 months ago)

yes, we've used it for a couple of weeks while testing it as a camera...that also gives us a pretty good idea what it is like as a phone - even though that's not the focus of our review.

4 upvotes
Gryfster
By Gryfster (10 months ago)

Yeah but that doesn't really qualify you to say that it is "excellent" (not that I disagree with you but it's not a professional opinion). For example did you test the phone in low signal areas for drops and sound quality against the competition? Browsing speed?

0 upvotes
1androiddreaming
By 1androiddreaming (10 months ago)

@Gryfster DPR is a site focused on... ummm... photography. They're testing the phone's camera, not its radio. And "excellent" isn't a professional opinion? If your doctor said to you (after reviewing your [whatever] test results): "I have excellent news" -- would you tell him/her to shut up and give you a "professional opinion?" What adjective constitutes a "professional opinion?" Wow.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Gryfster
By Gryfster (10 months ago)

1androiddreaming

I was not commenting on their review of the camera, which I think is well researched. My comment was that their assertion that it is an "excellent" overall phone is not researched.

I read many similar reviews on the iPhone 4 only to have antenna-gate ruin the phone experience for me (and please don't say I should have got a bumper).

If dpreview doesn't perform the same level of research on other aspects of the phone they should just not comment on it.

0 upvotes
Mooman
By Mooman (10 months ago)

I'm troubled by a discrepancy between the Apple 5s chart showing how it performed as compared to the Samsung Galaxy S4's chart.

The "Summary" for each phone gave the S4 an 8.0 and the 5s an 8.1, yet if you look at the bar graphs for the 6 different categories in the ratings box, the S4 overall wins out. In fact, I even measured the pixel length of the blue lines in Photoshop and found that the S4's bars are a net 88 pixels longer. Or said differently, the average bar length for the Apple is 320 pixels across all 6 categories whereas the average bar length for the Samsung is 334 (4.4% longer), yet they somehow rank the Apple as better overall?

Unless they have some *really* weird weighting scale, the final summary scores and the bar charts are out of whack. Can we find out the details how the 8.0 and the 8.1 were calculated?

6 upvotes
Nuno Saldanha
By Nuno Saldanha (10 months ago)

indeed! I've noticed that too. And what is strange, is that in this case, there is no Camera/video evaluation chart like in the S4. And watch the tests in good light conditions with the same ISO, to see S4 beats them all (by the way, I don't own an S4, so, I'm not defending by phone like so many do)

3 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

I've very thoroughly compared the GS4 to the 5s. While the S4 is better in the corners than both the 1020 and the iPhone 5s, otherwise,

- it's on par with the 5s in IQ elsewhere
- it's definitely worse than the 1020 elsewhere

See my detailed comparison at http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52202175 , where I've elaborated on this in length (using tons of comparative images)

BTW: I'm not an anti-Samsung guy. Actually, I've even stated the S4 Zoom (not to be mistaken for the, IQ-wise, definitely worse S4!) has excellent IQ, sometimes even besting the 1020. (See http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52239796 )
(see links in my other comments) and found that, apart from the corners (where the S4 is definitely better) they're on par.

2 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (10 months ago)

Don't be troubled, not all bars have the same weight, so the total "pixel amount" is kind of irrelevant for the final score.

3 upvotes
CyberAngel
By CyberAngel (10 months ago)

I put my own weighting - different to your BIAS
and that makes the Super4 twice as good as the 5Suck
It's called "statistics", right?

1 upvote
Mooman
By Mooman (10 months ago)

CyberAngel - whose bias are you referring to? Mine? I have no bias in this debate. I've never owned either a Samsung or and Apple phone. I was just noting a disparity how the bar charts they publish show the Samsung as better, but the numerical score shows the Apple to be better, and wanting clarification over which to trust.
Now if you're talking about editorial bias, I'm not even suggesting that - I was just wanting a consistent and understandable scoring system.

0 upvotes
madmaxmedia
By madmaxmedia (10 months ago)

Couple of things-
1. The iPhone 5 with iOS 7 is capable of video zooming too. Obviously it's digital and not optical zoom, but can still be useful.
2. HDR mode on the iPhones produces pretty natural looking (restrained) output, and can compensate for the low dynamic range of phone camera sensors. I leave HDR on by default on my iPhone 5.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"1. The iPhone 5 with iOS 7 is capable of video zooming too. Obviously it's digital and not optical zoom, but can still be useful."

Also add that, as of iOS7 beta 2 and in third-party apps, that zoom was *lossless* (aka that of the high-end Nokias) - see http://www.iphonelife.com/blog/87/imaging-video-guru-reporting-lossless-video-zooming-ios7

I'll re-test this in the current 7.0.2 version of iOS to see whether the stock Camera client already has lossless zooming, or just lossy, as was the case, due to a bug / oversight, in the second beta.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

nevermind.

Comment edited 14 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"I'll re-test.."

Finished testing. It's lossless, which is GREAT news for all iPhone 5 / 5c / 5s owners. Will post a full report on it, with footage showing I'm right, very soon.

HOWEVER! You MUST remember you in no way should start shooting after zooming in to 3x (the max zoom). After zooming back, zoom at even 1.4x won't be lossless. Lossless-ness will only be done in recordings started from a state where losless zoom can still be applied - that is, anywhere between fully zoomed out and 1.44x. But in no way zoomed in more.

This seems to be a bug in Apple's algorithm - it may try use lossless zoom as much as possible to keep the IQ high - assuming you start from a position where lossless zoom can still be used. However, if you start recording from a longer zoom position, this won't be the case any more.

(Cont'd below)

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

(Cont'd from above)

Interestingly, this even applies to 3x (the maximum) digital zoom. If you start recording without zooming in (too much) before starting to record, the effective resolution at 3x zoom will be MUCH better than with the case of fully zooming in first and, then, starting recording.

This bug doesn't seem to be present with third-party apps, where you can zoom in before starting to record. For example, if you compile and deploy the small zooming app I've written (see section "4. Programmers Only: Utilizing Zoom in Yyour Own Apps" at http://www.iphonelife.com/blog/87/imaging-video-guru-reporting-lossless-video-zooming-ios7 ), you'll see I'm right. In that app, I zoom to the max ( self.videoDevice.videoZoomFactor = videoDevice.activeFormat.videoZoomFactorUpscaleThreshold;) before starting to record ( [self.fo startRecordingToOutputFileURL:fileURL recordingDelegate:self];).

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
1 upvote
mgatov
By mgatov (10 months ago)

Size is an issue that impacts other concerns. I accept the smaller screen size because I want a smaller phone to carry around. Until someone comes out with a holographic or foldable display, we make our choices and live with the constraints. First and foremost... I want a phone... small, high quality, seamlessly integrated and rock solid. The iPhone 5s gives me all of that. The camera works well enough for me. If I need more, I'll carry the RX100 around. It was a good review and told me what I needed to know. Thank you.

1 upvote
Ahender
By Ahender (10 months ago)

There are probably 1000 times more pictures taken in one day with phones compared to cameras. The quality of a phone image does matter.

7 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (10 months ago)

Well McDonalds sells billions of Cheeseburgers a year...

15 upvotes
CyberAngel
By CyberAngel (10 months ago)

web-joggers write *trillions* of meaningless one-liners in a day....ooops!

3 upvotes
Ahender
By Ahender (10 months ago)

Great one-liners. Don't quit your day job.

How many teenagers document their youth by carrying a camera around? I'm sure you did, or do.

As much as you probably discount that a phone can take an image, it is an essential part of growing up in this day and age.

2 upvotes
Jim Evidon
By Jim Evidon (10 months ago)

To DPReview:

IMO, you are spending too much space on cell phones and other gadgets whose primary purpose is not photography.
Leave the phone and other gadget reviews to sites that specialize in those things and are better suited to review all aspects of he product. Cell phones may take amazing pictures for what they are, but they are not serious cameras.Better images are available from most simple and inexpensive point and shoot cameras. Please stick to cameras. That is what built your site and your reader base.

16 upvotes
webrunner5
By webrunner5 (10 months ago)

Then why are you even here??

6 upvotes
Tony Bologna
By Tony Bologna (10 months ago)

Really? These are two different sites. I'm fairly certain Mr. Ferenczi was hired for the purpose of covering mobile technology therefore zero precious camera review resources were wasted. Go start your own camera review site.

7 upvotes
Jake2046
By Jake2046 (10 months ago)

DP = Digital Photography

Is a camera phone not digital photography?

7 upvotes
four under
By four under (10 months ago)

Given that there's many more people that use phones than "serious cameras" for imaging, I'm sure these reviews are of interest to a great many people. And really; how many "serious cameras" come along any more? Most "new" releases are just warmed over versions of last year's.

3 upvotes
Tonkotsu Ramen
By Tonkotsu Ramen (10 months ago)

"Most "new" releases are just warmed over versions of last year's."

uhh.. four under.. What rock have you been living under? It's the same for smartphones..

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"It's the same for smartphones.."

Definitely not true. Even the iPhone 5s received a (at least burst, slow motion- and pano-wise) significantly better camera, let alone the best flagships:

- LG G2 (OIS, 1080p60, albeit not with the best possible IQ)

- 1020 (OIS - it wasn't present in the 808!)

- Note III (4k)

1 upvote
CyberAngel
By CyberAngel (10 months ago)

Jim: disConnect

0 upvotes
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (10 months ago)

Well it does call better than my D3S or D800 for sure....that is why I use a phone and not a camera which pretends to be a phone for calling and social messaging.

Comment edited 45 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
vadims
By vadims (10 months ago)

I'd definitely add "Low light performance worse than that of predecessor" to "The Bad" part of the summary. Every part of the chart a happened to look at was noticeably better rendered by iPhone 5 than by 5s -- and that at more than twice the ISO.

Given that 5s picked ISO320 and 5 picked ISO800, in real life photos taken by 5s should also be [much] more affected by motion blur...

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"I'd definitely add "Low light performance worse than that of predecessor" to "The Bad" part of the summary. Every part of the chart a happened to look at was noticeably better rendered by iPhone 5 than by 5s -- and that at more than twice the ISO."

I'd state SOME parts of the test image were rendered by the 5s in a much inferior way - dunno why. For example, the B&W portrait of the old man (the one the chart initially comes up) is absolutely awful on the 5s (only the G2's rendition is worse) and much better on the 5.

However, almost everywhere else, the 5s produces better results than the 5.

Dunno what this major difference is caused by. Some kind of over-exposure?

1 upvote
Jim in Hudson
By Jim in Hudson (10 months ago)

My recollection is the iPhone DID have a two-stage shutter button under iOS 6. First stage was touching the button icon and second stage (capturing the photo) was releasing your finger from the button. Doesn't seem that way with iOS 7 unless I'm missing something.

0 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (10 months ago)

no, pressing and holding the virtual shutter button on the 5s triggers a burst.

2 upvotes
Jim in Hudson
By Jim in Hudson (10 months ago)

It's not just the 5s... seems to be any iPhone under iOS 7. I guess that's the price to pay to get multi-shot bursts.

1 upvote
four under
By four under (10 months ago)

I just tried my iPod touch 5th generation with iOS 7.1 on it . Holding the shutter creates a burst on it too.

1 upvote
JordanAT
By JordanAT (10 months ago)

iOS6 (6.2, to be exact) actuates the shutter the moment your finger leaves the screen, allowing you to take a picture with minimal lag without "stabbing" at the screen.

1 upvote
Nuno Saldanha
By Nuno Saldanha (10 months ago)

Compare the 1600 ISO with the 320 ISO IPHone? What kind of absurd test is this? How much IPhone paid for this test?

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (10 months ago)

those are the ISOs auto modes of the phones pick for this scene. On the iPhone you can't even select ISO manually.

5 upvotes
Markintosh
By Markintosh (10 months ago)

"Smallish screen"? it's bigger than regular camera screen. 5" screen its not compact anymore.

"Manual controls"? This is phone, not DSLR:))

"Photographic ergonomics not the best" and "No dedicated, two-stage shutter button." You are kidding, right?

3 upvotes
3DSimmon
By 3DSimmon (10 months ago)

you should check out the competition, nobody is kidding!

8 upvotes
vadims
By vadims (10 months ago)

> "Smallish screen"?

Yes, compared to competition. Definitely way too small for me, personally (plan on going from current S3 to Note II).

> "Manual controls"? This is phone, not DSLR:))

Agree with you on this one.

> "Photographic ergonomics not the best" and "No dedicated, two-stage shutter button." You are kidding, right?

Probably not. I for one agree with that -- just can'd stand iPhone 4 and later models (3G was very good, to my taste). Used Motorola DROID with the shutter button and am missing dearly it now on S3 (DROID's photo quality was an absolute disaster though).

2 upvotes
Lars Rehm
By Lars Rehm (10 months ago)

when we come up with pro/cons lists we obviously take into account what the competition is doing and I am sorry to say that most Android and Windows phones offer all those features.

8 upvotes
SWSF14
By SWSF14 (10 months ago)

The screen is smallish in terms of width, in portrait orientation. Apple chose to make the screen taller when the 5 came out, accommodating an extra row of icons.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"I am sorry to say that most Android and Windows phones offer all those features."

Not only most - ALL of them, at least regarding

- manual ISO
- manual WB
- proper exposure compensation.

These have always been settable in all Android and WP versions in the stock Camera apps - even in the earliest ones.

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"Manual controls"? This is phone, not DSLR:))"

Well, actually, as has also been commented on above, competing mobile operating systems do offer a lot more manual settings even in their stock camera apps. EVERY SINGLE, even the cheapest, Android and WP phone. With Nokia's higher-end WP8 phones, you can set EVERYTHING (apart from the fixed aperture, of course).

""Photographic ergonomics not the best" and "No dedicated, two-stage shutter button." You are kidding, right?"

Again: the competition (e.g., Nokia) has it.

2 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (10 months ago)

Thats a really high score for such a long list of significant cons.. e.g. the "photographic ergonomics not the best" alone demoted the Sony RX100/2 to a silver award.

hmmmm

3 upvotes
CyberAngel
By CyberAngel (10 months ago)

The slow motion is a fun gig
The burst mode helps to get non-shaken photos without OIS
The camera - after some software fixes - is the BEST non-OIS camera out there
MAybe the result is a little biased..I dunno

1 upvote
stuntmonkey
By stuntmonkey (10 months ago)

I've had both the 4s and the 5s side by side. In limited light, what I'm seeing is that the 5s (like the 5) doesn't render low contrast details as well as the 4s, but still produces hard edges and boundaries that the typical iPhone user would find pleasing. Agree that the flash seems to overexpose, but the dual led flash can sometimes get it *really* wrong a make the image look like it was shot with an orange gel filter.

1 upvote
SergioMO
By SergioMO (10 months ago)

In low light and web size, Lumia 1020 is much much better then iphone. In good light I prefer S4 and Lumia 1020.

Comment edited 31 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (10 months ago)

So to keep it simple, 1020 is much better and iPhone sucks?

9 upvotes
supeyugin1
By supeyugin1 (10 months ago)

In both bright and low light Nokia is a bit better than S4, except for the corners, iphone is worse than both Nokia and Samsung. Overall, I'd say Samsung is better than anything else.

5 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

" Overall, I'd say Samsung is better than anything else."

The S4? No way. While it IS better in the corners than both the 1020 and the iPhone 5s, otherwise,

- it's on par with the 5s in IQ elsewhere
- it's definitely worse than the 1020 elsewhere

See my detailed comparison at http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52202175 , where I've elaborated on this in length (using tons of comparative images)

BTW: I'm not an anti-Samsung guy. Actually, I've even stated the S4 Zoom (not to be mistaken for the, IQ-wise, definitely worse S4!) has excellent IQ, sometimes even besting the 1020. (See http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52239796 )

1 upvote
SergioMO
By SergioMO (10 months ago)

I´m using Nokia 808 for photos and my S3 for everything else ! S3 is fantastic but Nokia is the mobile camera king. With NFC I transfer all the photos to S3.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"I´m using Nokia 808 for photos and my S3 for everything else ! S3 is fantastic but Nokia is the mobile camera king. With NFC I transfer all the photos to S3."

Exactly. The 808 has, apart from the lack of OIS, better IQ than even the 1020. And even the 1020 has significantly better IQ than the GS4, let alone the GS3.

2 upvotes
CyberAngel
By CyberAngel (10 months ago)

The lack of OIS in the Nokia 808 (vs the Lumia 1020)
causes less IQ in low-light
causes shaky video
BUT
not over-sharpening
not over-saturating
has corners ok
=> IQ daylight KING (on smartphones)

0 upvotes
Total comments: 152
About us
Sitemap
Connect