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New camera app features in Apple's iOS 8

67

We wrote yesterday about some of the imaging related changes that Apple announced with the latest version of its mobile operating system, iOS 8, at its annual developers event WWDC. Now that users have had a day or so to play with the developers' beta version of iOS 8, a few more photo features have been discovered that were not mentioned in the keynote. Here's a quick summary:

Time-Lapse Mode

There is a good selection of time lapse apps available in the App Store but Apple has now apparently decided to integrate this feature into the standard camera app. Next to Video and Slo-Mo there is now also a Time-Lapse mode. By the looks of it, it's a fairly basic implementation, without much control over shooting and processing parameters. So if you're a time-lapse aficionado you might still be better off with one of the more complex dedicated apps.

Separate control of exposure and focus

Until now in the iPhone camera app the exposure had been locked to the focus point. In most shooting scenarios this works fine but occasionally, when you want or have to focus on very dark or bright area of the frame, you might end up with an over- or underexposed image. Some third-party camera apps and many Android phones have therefore been allowing separate control of exposure and focus for quite some time. 

Now Apple has integrated some additional control over exposure into its own camera app as well. The focus point is selected as before, by tapping on the screen. However, you can now adjust exposure by sliding up or down. 

Self-Timer

The self-timer does what it says and allows you to set a 3- or 10-second delay for the occasions when you want to be in the picture yourself. Now just make sure you carry a decent smartphone-tripod or other support with you, otherwise this new mode won't be of much use to you.

Instant Burst Mode

Very little detail has been surfaced about this new mode but we can only assume it is an improvement of the iPhone's current burst mode in some shape or form. It's possible that it could facilitate a version of the post-capture focusing features we've seen in other smartphones, too. We'll post an update once we know more. 

iPad panorama mode

The last new photo feature is for iPad users only. In iOS 7 you could not take panoramic images on an iPad. This has now been rectified with iOS 8 and you can sweep your tablet around to capture the landscape that's surrounding you. Just make sure you don't hit any passerbys on the head by accident.  

Source: Petapixel


Comments

Total comments: 67
Menneisyys

The first major release of my fully manual camera app is out. See my dedicated article here in the DPR forums:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/53824563

0 upvotes
woz

that's passers-by or passersby not passerbys.

It's difficult enough to discretely take a panorama with an iphone, but waving an ipad around.... on the other hand the mass should help.
Just saying...

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

Some hours ago, Apple released a full PASM (manual) camera app (as source code):

https://developer.apple.com/library/prerelease/ios/samplecode/AVCamManual/Introduction/Intro.html

I *really* recommend it as it's more capable than my app as it allows for, among other things, setting the tint color.

However, it lacks any kind of EXIF output: not only location data, but even basic EXIF data like ISO, shutter speed etc. I'll add EXIF saving (incl. location data) to it in my custom version.

In addition, it only saves 1920*1080 (that is, full HD) images. I'll modify the code and release a version with full-size image output too.

It doesn't contain manual flashlight control.

(cont'd)

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

(continued from above)

It also limits the maximal shutter speed to 1/1000s, while, as I've already explained earlier, iDevcies are generally capable of much higher shutter speeds; for example, the iPad3 to 1/37037s. (of course, I *really* don't think it's indeed that fast in practice, not even in full electronic shutter mode. Nevertheless, the default 1/1000s is a bit too limiting.) I'll also remove this restriction.

Finally, I'll add some nice blurred background to the titles so that they are always visible - as I've done in my manual app (see screenshot at http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=19207197&postcount=32 )

Note that, as is common with all third-party camera apps, it (obviously) has no access to the excellent (semi-)HDR and Sweep panorama mode of the stock Camera app. Apple REALLY should let app developers access those in their apps so that users don't need to switch between the stock Camera app and other apps whenever they want to shoot HDR and/or sweep pano shots.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Menneisyys

GREAT NEWS!!!!

I finally started coding. My first results: manual focus works on the iPad3 and is working GREAT (just like on, say, Nokia's WP devices).

Here is my self-standing, directly compilable & deployable app, along with two screenshots showing it in action:

http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=19199703&postcount=24

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

Exposure compensation is also working GREAT! (See my dedicated, earlier, pre-iOS8 article at http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1621351 for more info.)

Both the iPad2 and 3 allow for +/-8 EV compensation, which is certainly VERY good news. (Let me point out again that in my above-linked Exposure Compensation and Bracketing Bible, I did point out phone cameras, except for the Nokia 808 with its, among phone cams, unique +/-4 EV comp., only generally allow for +/-2 EV.)

Both iDevices produced decent results. That is, both the shutter speed and the ISO was properly and automatically adjusted, resulting in non-noisy images (with + EV) / ones without burnt-in highlights (- EV) - which would be characteristic of faux exp. comp applied AFTER taking an image.

More info on modifying my earlier source code to allow for manual exp. comp at http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=19201202&postcount=30

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

Continued playing with the manual settings.

First, the good news: Both shutter speed and ISO are freely and independently settable and they do work. (Of course, if you don't pay attention, this may result in some major under/overexposure.)

The usable ISO range is, according to my measurements,
min: iPad3: 51; iPad2 41
max: iPad3: 816; iPad2: 656

The maximum shutter speeds are as follows (minimum being, as has already been explained, 1s): iPad3: 0.000027; iPad2: 0.000037s

Second, the bad news: it seems iDevices (at least the iPad 2 and 3 but I really don't think other, current models are better) are only capable of shutter speeds up to 1s but no more. This was easy to predict as only dedicated cameraphones (for example, the 1020 with its max. 4s shutter) are capable of taking longer shots. That is, don't expect easy and factory nightshots without frame averaging.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

Programming: should you want to set the ISO and shutter speed yourself, just call setExposureModeCustomWithDuration. An example:

[device setExposureModeCustomWithDuration:CMTimeMake(1,1) ISO:100 completionHandler:nil];

This takes a shot with the shutter speed of 1s (1/1 = 1) and the ISO 100.

As promised, I'll VERY soon come up with a Nokia Camera-alike. Before that, I'll surely release a shooter with four, static sliders to set the four parameters (manual focus, shutter speed, ISO and (combining the latter two parameters) exp. compensation).

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

BTW, what I *really* hate is Apple's making it purposefully impossible to develop

- for new SDK's under old(er) OS'es
- for old SDK's under new(er) OS'es.

An example: I have two MBP's - a 17" one (my work horse) and a 13" one (which I rarely use because of the crappy screen resolution necessiating the use of an external monitor.) My 17" one runs on 10.8 because in my AppStore apps I still support armv6 (iPhone3G/iPod touch 2G) and Xcode 4.4.1, the last Xcode version to support compiling for armv6, doesn't even start under OS X 10.9.

Needless to say, OS X 10.9.4 is needed to run Xcode 6.0 beta required to compile for iOS8 and to access the new SDK.

In this regard, Microsoft is far less developer-unfriendly.

1 upvote
G3User

The demise of paid photography continues. I cant believe all the positive posts to this story. No pro photographers I guess among the comments? How sad. Steve Job's legacy is that he created a product that is killing off pro photography. This will only accelerate the process. Now, even soccer moms wont bother hiring a pro photographer, thinking that because they can slide a few levers on their tiny phone screens, they are now photographers and may convince them self's that they don't even need someone for their daughters wedding. How sad. and what a joke. Paid photography RIP.

2 upvotes
roblarosa

In other news, the sky is falling.

5 upvotes
Lars Rehm

come on, you posted exactly the same thing on the Instagram story. If you're a professional photographer and really feel threatened by cellphones in the hands of soccer mums you should probably think about a change of profession anyway.

14 upvotes
holger feroudj

Maybe time to think about how to make yourself stand out and to work on your photography, instead of whining about smartphone photography.

0 upvotes
grock

Indubitably! Huzzah to you, sir! I can certainly relate, having lost my job as a stage coach driver when these new-fangled horseless carriages arrived on the scene. And then my grandson lost his job as a mimeograph machine repairman when people no longer wanted purple copies of things.
I say that if something was a job at one point in history, it should ALWAYS be a job, no matter how low the barriers to entry become. People should still pay for services they no longer need because they've always paid for them, even if they can get satisfactory results by themselves! Take, for instance, this very comment. I could have typed it into the computer myself, but instead it's been transcribed by my secretary from her shorthand notes from a recording I made into a dictaphone.

6 upvotes
grock

But seriously, "Steve Job's legacy is that he created a product that is killing off pro photography."?
Ridiculous on at least three levels.
1- His legacy is a lot more than that
2- He didn't create the smartphone or camera phones, and the iPhone certainly isn't the only phone out there taking good-to-great photos
3-It's not killing pro photography, but it's weeding out a lot of bad and/or low-end pro-photographers.

Just because something is improving the way a certain action is accomplished, it doesn't mean that you can't still have a profession in that field. For example: Even with advanced tools like spell check and grammar check, there's still a high demand for good copy editors and people who can actually write well. Why? Because people still write things like "convince them self's that they don't even need someone for their daughters wedding."

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
MarshallG

I think that the Mac and Photoshop have done wonders for photography.

0 upvotes
Slouch Hooligan

You might say Henry Fords legacy was that he put all the makers of buggy whips out of work. Adapt or die.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

After installing it on one of my iPad2's, I've just finished installing iOS8 beta1 on one of my iPad 3's too.

There's no panorama support at all, meaning at least the iPad 2 and 3 will NOT be able to shoot panos. Which is kinda a letdown, given that the iPhone 4S, based on the same CPU and an even higher-Mpixel sensor (meaning more data to process) is capable of doing so.

The Air and the rMini do support panos (confirmed), on the other hand. Dunno about the iPad4 / Mini 1.

Separate focus & exposure setting works great and is much more intuitive than the previous two-square approach used by all AppStore apps + CameraTweak. (They couldn't have invented anything similar to the new swipe up/down method, anyway, given that in previous iOS versions the only way of separately setting the exposure was pointing the square to a subject area, not by directly "dialing in" a positive / negative exp. bias.)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Jen Yates

"There's no panorama support at all, meaning at least the iPad 2 and 3 will NOT be able to shoot panos."

Yeah because Beta 1 is always 100% feature complete across all supported devices.

By your logic iOS 8 won't allow anyone to install iPhoto or post reviews to the app store.

When Apple announce which devices will get which features then come back and talk to us. But until then don't make such factual statements on areas that are clearly likely to be in flux. You're sounding like you're new to this whole beta thing.

Comment edited 31 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Menneisyys

"Yeah because Beta 1 is always 100% feature complete across all supported devices."

I'm 99% sure the iPad2/3 in the final version won't receive pano either. Again, let me point out that the Air / rMini has flawless pano support NOW.

Again, Apple is known for not implementing new features on "old" but still perfectly capable hardware. The A5 CPU, especially paired with the low-resolution sensor (compared to the 8 Mpixel one in the iPhone 4S) would be more than able to stitch panos. Nevertheless, because of Apple's stance on supporting old models, these two iPads will NOT receive pano.

0 upvotes
quiquae

iPad 2's camera is a sub-1Mpix joke, pointless for anything beyond record-taking purposes. I don't understand why anyone who cares enough about photography to create a DPReview account would even think about using it.

iPad 3 actually has a camera with a fighting chance to take decent photos. However, as any iPad 3 owner can tell you, the CPU/GPU inside was never quite adequate to drive the retina display UI. (iPhone 4S has to drive a much smaller display.) I don't think the camera hardware is the same, either; contemporary reviews note that the iPad camera is clearly slower than iPhone's. So there may be good technical reasons why iPad 3 cannot do pano well enough for Apple to enable the feature.

1 upvote
Menneisyys

"iPad 2's camera is a sub-1Mpix joke, pointless for anything beyond record-taking purposes. I don't understand why anyone who cares enough about photography to create a DPReview account would even think about using it."

Absolutely disagreed. The vast majority of third-party on-iDevice pano stitchers generally use vertical resolutions around 720 pixels, at least in their default ("fast", not "quality") mode. So did the previous Google Camera app's sweep pano mode. Or Nokia's one on Symbian. Or Microsoft's otherwise, stitching quality-wise, pretty good pano shooter (Photosynth) on all supported platforms (iOS, WP).

That is, being restricted to "only" shoot panos 720 pixels high (unless pano shooting in portrait mode is allowed for 1280 pixel high panos) isn't that big a problem.

Finally, the low IQ of the iPad2's camera wouldn't be that big a problem - after all, sweep panos aren't that high quality on any platform (not only mobile ones - see e.g. Sony's implementation), after all.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Menneisyys

"However, as any iPad 3 owner can tell you, the CPU/GPU inside was never quite adequate to drive the retina display UI. (iPhone 4S has to drive a much smaller display.) I don't think the camera hardware is the same, either; contemporary reviews note that the iPad camera is clearly slower than iPhone's."

I'm afraid you're wrong. I've just benchmarked this on one of my iOS8-upgraded iPad3's: it's capable of 2.54 fps burst shooting under good light, which is only a bit short of the iPhone 5 with its 3 fps (sporting a faster A6 but also a significantly larger-res sensor) and is almost three times(!!!) faster than the iPhone 4. (Also see my other benchmarks at http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1698879 )

All in all, the sensor's readout time isn't the problem. Neither is the speed of the A5 CPU. Let me point out that it does NOT execute non-graphical stuff slower than the A5 in the iPhone 4S - and dynamic pano stitching would belong to this category.

0 upvotes
rdscibilia

The iPhone needs more megapixels, although it appears Apple is not going in this direction. A quality eight-megapixel image is fine, but you need some space for cropping.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

If and only if they also increase the sensor size. But, as not even Apple can beat the laws of physics and they surely won't make a camera hump and/or a phone thicker than 7.5mm, it's highly unlikely we will ever see a significantly larger (larger than, say, 1/2.3") sensor in an iPhone.

That is, if they can't increase the sensor size, they'd be better sticking with a "low" resolution. They in no ways should go the Sony way with their, on the pixel level, absolutely awful 20 Mpixel sensors.

0 upvotes
tkbslc

disagree. 8-10MP is enough.

1 upvote
rdscibilia

Okay, I'll settle for 10. :)

0 upvotes
graybalanced

If you want to print an 8x10 image at 300dpi you only need 7.2 megapixels. So there is already space for cropping.

Next question: How many people still print 8x10 images?

In the reality of most people, the iPhone already gives them more megapixels than they will use 95% of the time. The iPhone already has twice as many megapixels as you need to fill a Retina MacBook Pro full screen!

For people who mostly post to social media, most of the current megapixels in an iPhone are dead weight that takes up valuable space on your phone and in your backups.

1 upvote
jmajors

Interesting that the RAW support is never mentioned because it DOES let you save RAW files. It can be saved and uploaded to iCloud.

It's right on Apple's website: http://www.apple.com/ios/ios8/photos/

0 upvotes
Lars Rehm

if I am not totally mistaken they are talking about Raw files that have been taken with a DSLR and then uploaded to iPhoto. You can't capture Raw files with an iPhone. Not yet at least.

1 upvote
Menneisyys

"if I am not totally mistaken they are talking about Raw files that have been taken with a DSLR and then uploaded to iPhoto. You can't capture Raw files with an iPhone. Not yet at least."

Yes, I too think this section is about uploading RAW files from the camera roll to iCloud, not about _capturing_ those RAW files.

So far, I haven't seen any API call on forcing saving RAW files. I'll report back if I find out anything.

1 upvote
arhmatic

What this really needed since 2007 was an exposure compensation button.
A simple +/- thing.
Yes, everything else is welcome, but this is really basic.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

Well, we still won't have this in the stock Camera app. There, all we can do is moving the exposure rectangle to a dark / bright spot to over / underexpose the image. This is, of course, far-far inferior to the solution of all other mobile OS'es. Let me point out again that for example Android had exp. compensation even some 4-5 years ago.

Hopwever, it seems it's possible to provide proper (!!!) and not faux (unlike, for example, KitCam's faux exp. slider explained in section "4. What about KitCam?" in my Exposure Compensation and Bracketing Bible at http://www.iphonelife.com/blog/87/exposure-compensation-and-bracketing-bible ) exp. comp. via at least one of the new, iOS8+ methods I've listed below starting with "setExposure".

I'll soon report back on whether these methods can indeed be used for proper exp. comp., as under other mobile OS'es. If they can, then, third-party apps will be able to provide us exp. comp. - at last.

0 upvotes
AngryCorgi

I'll stick with snappycam until they match the ani-gif output option

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

BTW, I have some great news: SnappyCam is fully iOS8-compatible. (See my just-posted full report at http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=19195788&postcount=7 for more info.)

1 upvote
OldDigiman

Still waiting for the ability to import only the jpegs from raw+JPEG shoots. Continuing fail from Apple.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

Folks,

I have some GREAT news for you all: the Camera API in iOS8 seems to start supporting all manual settings:

- focus (on non-fixed focus devices, obviously, which means the iPad2 won't be supported, but everything else will)

- aperture (of course none of the current iDevices have variable aperture - this aint Nokia n86)

- ISO

- shutter speed (something sorely missing on Android)

I've uploaded the file, AVCaptureDevice.h, which contains all the declarations of the for app developers available methods. In order to find the brand new, above methods, search for "8_0". (Without the quotes, obviously.)

The file is at https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/81986513/062014/AVCaptureDevice.h

I'll continue providing you with more info and, before long, a FULL app (with sources) that makes it possible to use the new features. (Before you ask: yes, I've published several of such open source apps back in the iOS7 beta days, before the final release of the OS.)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
vFunct

Any info on raw capture or raw file formats?

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

No sign of it yet. Will report back if I find anything related.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

Here are the four brand new methods setting all of the above parameters:

- (void)setFocusModeLockedWithLensPosition:(float)lensPosition completionHandler:(void (^)(CMTime syncTime))handler NS_AVAILABLE_IOS(8_0);
- (void)setExposureModeCustomWithDuration:(CMTime)duration ISO:(float)ISO completionHandler:(void (^)(CMTime syncTime))handler NS_AVAILABLE_IOS(8_0);
- (void)setWhiteBalanceModeLockedWithDeviceWhiteBalanceGains:(AVCaptureWhiteBalanceGains)whiteBalanceGains completionHandler:(void (^)(CMTime syncTime))handler NS_AVAILABLE_IOS(8_0);
- (void)setExposureTargetBias:(float)bias completionHandler:(void (^)(CMTime syncTime))handler NS_AVAILABLE_IOS(8_0);

I will very soon code an app that sets (via manual user interface-based controls) these values to see whether they're already working and how they behave on different iOS8-capable hardware (iPad2 and iPad3 for start).

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
noirdesir

The thing I love about the iPhone 4 and 5 hardware design is that I don't need a tripod, just a flat surface.

1 upvote
Samuel Dilworth

One of the many things that makes the iPhone camera surprisingly useful. (It will be interesting to combine this with the self-timer.) Another is that the lens is at a corner, allowing – depending on phone orientation – very close proximity to objects. That makes for interesting compositions and more light on very close subjects.

(I’ve even taken advantage of the corner-mounted camera to peek under closed doors!)

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Jogger

They need a feature that disables video capture in portrait orientation.

13 upvotes
George Cifrancis

Yup. Say no to vertical videos! :-)

The "YouTube Capture" app on the iPhone actually forces the user to rotate their phone to horizontal. I wish the stock iPhone camera app did that.

0 upvotes
BrunoH

"Some third-party camera apps and many Android phones have therefore been allowing separate control of exposure and focus for quite some time. "

Why do you insist on comparing with Android? Almost all Android phones have crap cameras.

The natural thing would be to compare to the best phonecameras on the market - Nokia Lumia 9xx and 1xxx series. Dont you think so?

And by the way. Nokia phones have of course had these options on all their phones!

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Lars Rehm

well, I think it is a valid comparison because there is a bazillion of Android phones out there and if you buy a phone these days, just in terms of market share, it is usually between Android and iPhone. You are completely right though, the Nokia devices usually have very decent cameras.

1 upvote
Emacs23

iphone camera isn't any better than much of android crowd, you think too good about apple phone if you think it can compete with that nokias. There are also better android cameras, like xperia z1, etc. The only advantage I see on the iphone side is the shutter lag. On the other hand, android now has much better panorama engine (see google camera).

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

"There are also better android cameras, like xperia z1, etc."

Look, I'm in no way an Apple fanboy, but this was ridiculous. The Z1's camera is REALLY bad and can't in any way match the 5s. Not even that of the Z2, for that matter.

" The only advantage I see on the iphone side is the shutter lag."

And the sweep pano. And, with the 5s, the burst speed.

" On the other hand, android now has much better panorama engine (see google camera)."

Sorry, but this is complete BS. I've very thoroughly tested the new pano feature of the Google app and found that, while it's much-much better than the sweep pano of the previous major version, it in no way can stitch frames as flawlessly as the iPhone.

Let me repeat: I'm NOT an Apple fanboy. I've had very heated debates with some people justifying Apple's anti-consumer decisions (e.g., 1GB of RAM in Retina iPads; cr@ppy Bluetooth implementation etc.) even at DPR's own iOS forum.

0 upvotes
Emacs23

"Sorry, but this is complete BS. I've very thoroughly tested the new pano feature of the Google app and found that, while it's much-much better than the sweep pano of the previous major version, it in no way can stitch frames as flawlessly as the iPhone."
I cannot imagine how crappy sweep can be better than android guided mode, which gives subtle control over composition. And, possibly you don't know yet, android recently released rectangular projection for 3x3 stitch: that is really amazing.
In other words, iphone may be stitch better, but google camera is just a better app overall.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

"I cannot imagine how crappy sweep can be better than android guided mode, which gives subtle control over composition."

Look, get a, say, iPhone 5 and a, say, N7 2013. Make some panos from exactly the same position. I *guarantee* the iPhone's pano will show much fewer (if any!) stitching errors. (Of course, WRT variable exposure, the Android app wins anything iPhone but the 5s. Nevertheless, almost all third-party, stitching-based iOS apps support variable exposure.)

Again, I've tested tons of pano apps - see my huge collection of pano iOS test shots on my flicker page. I certainly know what the iOS' sweep pano (and third-party apps) are capable of.

0 upvotes
Emacs23

Ouch, I knew this. Sorry dude, panoramas you have posted are a pure joke.
Sweep mode is a toy to try it once and forget. Guided google camera's mode thanks to its subtle control gives much more room for creativity.
I just don't get the point of shooting long wide belts. They are crappy. I'm using "belt" panoramas in the way like this:
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/12196364/gallery/2014.05.10/2014-05-1210.06.43.jpg
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/12196364/gallery/2014.05.10/2014-05-2316.15.45.jpg

And google recently introduced rectangular stitching, like this:
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/12196364/gallery/2014.06.03/PANO_20140602_152619.jpg

I said already: iPhone may stitch better, but it its panorama mode is useless. Google's camera is just much better for creative purposes.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

"Ouch, I knew this. Sorry dude, panoramas you have posted are a pure joke."

1, they are all demonstrating the capabilities of each pano app for iOS, incl. that of Apple themselves for my (numerous) articles on pano shooting. They are NOT meant for artistic purposes and in no way meant to be as flawless as possible.

2, even DPReview state the sweep pano of iPhones are just GREAT (for what it's worth: quick shares without any kind of post processing): http://connect.dpreview.com/post/2570079115/confessions-of-iphone5s-panorama-addict . Are also the DPR folks wrong?

0 upvotes
Emacs23

DPR is always wrong, these guys are just bunch of amateurs with close to zero knowledge in theoretical digital photography and questionable photographic skills.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

"DPR is always wrong, these guys are just bunch of amateurs with close to zero knowledge in theoretical digital photography and questionable photographic skills."

This pretty much tells whether you should be taken seriously.

0 upvotes
tomatoketchup

Excellent... more tyros holding their gigantic pads out at arms length will now be able to swing their monstrosities from left to right, looking even more like complete tools.

3 upvotes
photo_rb

They may look like tools to you but the iPad's large screen has some benefit for photography, especially for people with bad eyesight.
Poor Ansel Adams was a huge tool with that monstrous 8x10 camera.

6 upvotes
tomatoketchup

I give heaps of props to anyone willing to haul around a view camera, set it up properly on a tripod, and make a nicely composed shot.

The soccer moms who feel the need to carry around an iPad on vacation, stand with feet 1.5 shoulder widths apart, and impede everyone else's view with a big black slab is not even remotely in the same ballpark as what Ansel used to do.

http://www.theonion.com/articles/man-taking-photo-with-ipad-oblivious-to-how-badass,33482/

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
1 upvote
webrunner5

Maybe if Ansel Adams was alive today he MIGHT be using a i Pad. I meet him one time at the Cincinnati Arts Museum viewing some of his photographs, which by the way were just stunning in real life, and he wore glasses that was as thick as Coke Bottles at the time. So hey you never know.

He was a VERY special, kind person. Few people like him in this world anymore.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Menneisyys

Anybody against iPad shooting: sometimes one only has an iPad around and nothing else with a better camera. (Happened to me once too.) Then, you'll be more than thankful to have a decent(ly supported) camera in the iPad.

Believe me - it happened to me too.

0 upvotes
Impulses

I just don't understand how you leave home with a 10" tablet but not your (far smaller/cheaper) phone... I think it's safe to assume the vast majority of people with tablets also have smartphones, I'm sure there's exceptions but they don't account for the number of dimwits we see using iPads as their camera. Grandpa using a tablet to take pic might be ok, some soccer mom or young dude just looks bad.

1 upvote
Menneisyys

Yeah, ONCE happened to me during the last 3+ years (ever since the camera-equipped iPad2 was released). So it CAN happen, albeit not very frequently.

0 upvotes
rdscibilia

Yes, we all know photography is about how you look doing it.

0 upvotes
D200_4me

Finally...separate focus and exposure selection. My most wanted feature.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

Just remember: they have always been available via

- most third-party apps
- if you JB (which is highly recommended), even the stock Camera app via CameraTweak

2 upvotes
Menneisyys

I've also posted quite a bit of info & several iOS8 screenshots on the new features to DPReview's previous articles:

http://connect.dpreview.com/post/7934751866/ios8-apple-makes-changes-to-photos-app#comments

Will go on posting:
- the new Camera interface on the iPad3 (as opposed to iPad2, where there's no Panorama support at all, timelapse doesn't seem to work and, obviously, there's no focus setting capabilities.)
- the new Camera API - its improvements, whether it supports more manual settings / modes etc. (Again, it was me who published tons of articles on programming the Camera API under iOS. So rest assured: I know what I'll be talking about.)

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
corbus

My proposal is that all camera manufacturers built in telephone/internet functions into the cameras instead...

2 upvotes
tkbslc

What kind of phoneSLR backpack do you recommend?

0 upvotes
Total comments: 67
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