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10 outstanding mobile photographers named finalists in annual awards

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The top 10 finalists of the Mobile Photography Awards have been named, one will be chosen as the MPA Photographer/Artist of the Year this Friday.

The top 10 finalists in this year's Mobile Photography Awards run the gamut of mobile art -- from heavily manipulated surrealist works to black and white portraiture that you'll find hard to believe was taken on a smartphone. 

But the medium is no longer the story, says Daniel Berman, founder of the annual awards. 

"We are past the point of saying, 'Oh wow, these were done on a smartphone!' and well into the next phase of determining who the leading artists are who happen to work in the medium," Berman explained.

This year's top 10 finalists are: Roger Clay, Marie Matthews, Souichi Furusho, Gusbano, Sarah Jarrett, Melissa Vincent, Alfred Pleyer, Helen Breznik, Edyta Lipinksa and Lene Basma. You can see work from each on the MPA website.

One of them will be named the MPA Photographer/Artist of the Year on Friday, Feb. 15 -- watch for our story here on Connect.

The winners of 20 MPA categories were previously announced, including the DPReview Connect category, which invited participants to share images that conveyed what the word "connect" means to them. Souichi Furusho of Japan won the category with his image titled "Image Pic #51." Runner up was Michal Koralewski of Poland for "Winter Time." 

"Of our 20 image categories, we had winners from 11 different countries," Berman said. "This is truly a global movement that goes far beyond the social image sharing of Instagram. There are genuine artists using mobile devices to create works of art and we are here to celebrate and provide exposure to those people."

The MPA Grand Prize Jury includes Joanne Carter (publisher of mobile photography and art web resource The App Whisperer), Daria Polichetti (the co-founder of mobile photo and art community iPhoneart.com), Misho Baranovic (photographer and author of e-book iPhone Photography – How to Shoot, Edit and Share Great Photographs), Star Rush (the co-founder of Lys Photo Magazine and an instructor at the Cornish College of the Arts), Andy Royston (photographer, and a regular lecturer on mobile photography and art at the Museum of Discovery and Science in Ft. Lauderdale), Nettie Edwards (internationally recognized award-winning mobile photographer and artist) and Daniel Berman (filmmakerfine art photographer and Founder of the Mobile Photo Awards.)

Comments

Total comments: 10
Star Rush
By Star Rush (Feb 14, 2013)

congratulations to the artists and photographers

0 upvotes
magneto shot
By magneto shot (Feb 14, 2013)

browsed thru the images, very interesting images no doubt. but makes me wonders if editing heavily is the only way to make mobile photography stand out since its inherent low quality images would not stand a chance.

0 upvotes
Daniel K Berman
By Daniel K Berman (Feb 14, 2013)

I think there is a something about the tactile nature of the mobile editing process that attracts visual artists. The all in one shooting/processing/sharing aspect of the device also seems to have given visual artists a new tool with which to play - and some very talented ones are playing! I really believe it's a simple matter of demographics and the availability of so many creative apps.

The other genre that seems to attract mobile usage is street. I believe this is so due to the stealth factor and the always-with-you factor. We see a lot of really high quality street photos at the MPA. It's no wonder that the street shooters and the visual artists seem to rise to the top of the mobile heap.

0 upvotes
Star Rush
By Star Rush (Feb 14, 2013)

do you mean "low quality" as in technical output from a mobile phone or do you mean "low quality" as in subject, concept, composition, etc.? There's plenty of exceptional representational photographers working with the smart phone medium, even if this list may lean toward non-representational work in this instance in time.

0 upvotes
Daniel K Berman
By Daniel K Berman (Feb 14, 2013)

I think Star is right. This is one list at one time based upon what was submitted. There are plenty of people working in the mobile space who excel at representational imagery. Quality of the tech really isn't an issue if the imagery is compelling.

0 upvotes
Peter Berressem
By Peter Berressem (Feb 14, 2013)

Absolutely impressing images, regardless what recording device was used.

0 upvotes
dgeugene1
By dgeugene1 (Feb 13, 2013)

Why do columnists, etc. keep raving about a picture being made with a smartphone?...a picture "you'll find hard to believe was taken on a smartphone".

If I had a phone in a Nikon D800 would they still rave on?

0 upvotes
Daniel K Berman
By Daniel K Berman (Feb 13, 2013)

I guess you missed this part of the article.

"We are past the point of saying, 'Oh wow, these were done on a smartphone!' and well into the next phase of determining who the leading artists are who happen to work in the medium," Berman explained

2 upvotes
Aaron Tsuru
By Aaron Tsuru (Feb 14, 2013)

Agreed. But it's far from unusual for the camera to be the "type of photography" to identify work; tintype, polaroid, pinhole, etc, some are more obvious and distinct than other, of course.

What makes the smartphone different to me is the ubiquity of the medium. Yeah, some people always have a camera on them, but now everyone's got a camera on them, even if they never use it. It's a different mentality and it's creating a massive "our world everyday", I don't know, maybe a "populist" kinda photography.

Well, whatever you call it... It's great to see some of the standouts in this new technology!

0 upvotes
Daniel K Berman
By Daniel K Berman (Feb 13, 2013)

Really fantastic and inspiring work from a range of diverse artists working in the mobile arena. Congrats to the top ten!

0 upvotes
Total comments: 10
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