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I always feel like somebody's watching me: The effect of wearable cameras

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Google Glass grew one step closer to reality this week as beta testers got word they'd been selected for the Glass Explorers program.

With Google's Project Glass officially announcing the winners of its Glass Explorers beta testing program yesterday, it seems we're that much closer to actually seeing Google's wearable, interactive camera move from the realm of possibility to everyday reality.

Other "lifeblogging" cameras are also coming closer to fruition: Memoto's GPS-equipped camera automatically captures two 5MP geotagged photos a minute and expects to begin shipping by May. We're also waiting on Autographer, another 5MP wearable camera that uses an array of built-in sensors to take pictures automatically triggered by changes in its environment.

In advance of this brave new world in which we'll all be more widely recorded, some futurists are raising the red flag of caution. If everyone is wearing a constantly recording, super subtle camera, what are the implications for personal privacy, the law and our own safety? 

Memoto automatically captures two 5MP geotagged photos a minute. Apps for both iPhone and Android will allow you to access your Memoto images in timeline format searchable by time, date, place and even lighting conditions, with sharing functionality to social networks.

Will we ever be able to keep a secret again? Could "lifelog" data be subpoenaed? Martin Bryant at The Next Web has recently taken the time to explore some worst-case scenarios we felt were worth sharing again.

Bryant asks if the new technology will force us to be more closely guarded in our words and actions, pointing out that today's “don’t tweet that” warning during a conversation could well become “don’t Glass this.”

What types of business and public buildings may ban wearable cameras? We can certainly predict art galleries won't want an entire collection recorded, and such tech could feel uncomfortable while you're trying to unwind in your local pub. Seattle dive bar 5 Point Cafe may be ahead of the curve in its publicity-seeking proposal to ban Google Glass from its seedy surroundings where, according to owner Dave Meinert, customers come for a degree of anonymity.

And while a politician in West Virginia has already proposed a bill banning the use of "a wearable computer with a head-mounted display" (i.e. Google Glass) while driving, Bryant takes this line of thinking far further by considering larger implications of wearable tech and the law, including its potential for fighting crime and for providing the perfect alibi.

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Comments

Total comments: 127
12
PhD4
By PhD4 (Apr 4, 2013)

So in short ... movie pirating will be on the increase ?

Hopefully these glasses will keep people from walking in front of the screen.

0 upvotes
Bob Meyer
By Bob Meyer (Apr 4, 2013)

Those folks wearing BT headsets should be happy. They'll no longer be the geekiest looking geeks on the face of the earth. I can't wait to see people running into lamp posts and falling into fountains because they're paying more attention to some silly you tube video than where they're going.

1 upvote
andras11
By andras11 (Apr 2, 2013)

Use em when riding a bicycle, otherwise what's the point ?

0 upvotes
Mike Walters
By Mike Walters (Apr 2, 2013)

Why would anyone think anyone else is interested in 'lifeblogging', maybe I have underestimated just how vain people are. I think the only people who will wear these things will be sad social misfits.

0 upvotes
MadMacStew
By MadMacStew (Apr 2, 2013)

In 'years to come', you will not be able to turn off autoposting, because the government will insist that all citizens wear Google Glass (or more likely the implanted equivalent.......) all the time. After all, if you are doing nothing wrong you have nothing to fear........

0 upvotes
gegiejoe
By gegiejoe (Apr 2, 2013)

If in years to come, hearing about how I forgot to turn off auto posting. Some will say "ya rite" you forgot. Younger kids wearing in private situations, like restrooms, locker rooms. "BEHIND THE SCENES" ie; pro football and YouTube will seem a nudist camp! Lawsuit after lawsuit of the I forgot.

0 upvotes
nathanleebush
By nathanleebush (Apr 1, 2013)

I wrote about these implications when the glasses were first announced: http://blog.adoramarentals.com/2012/05/10/google-glasses-welcome-to-the-panopticon/

0 upvotes
Chris Vincent
By Chris Vincent (Apr 1, 2013)

I think the most common video recorded by these will be of someone who is not happy about being filmed removing them from the wearer and stamping on them

0 upvotes
acid_test
By acid_test (Apr 1, 2013)

So they will arrest people who wear these in/around trains, bridges, federal buildings, airports, chemical plants, kindergardens, malls, etc. Right?

0 upvotes
Octane
By Octane (Mar 31, 2013)

Cameras document what happened and by nature they are neutral. They don't have 'selective memory', they don't tell their version of a story, they just document. I think it will make people more accountable for their actions thus making them 'hopefully' more responsible. The acquisition and sharking of information has already been taken out of the hands of the media and put into everyone's hands with the internet, Youtube, twitter and in general through social media. Wearable cameras are just the visual extension of that. People already take photos pretty much everywhere with their phones.

1 upvote
Dafffid
By Dafffid (Mar 31, 2013)

If everyone on demos wore cameras would save a lot of lies being endlessly repeated by the media. The police can't stop everyone filming them, and camera wearers would have to behave themselves too.

2 upvotes
fstein
By fstein (Mar 31, 2013)

Interesting phenomenon - when surgeons document informed consent on video, patients have almost zero recall of what they were told

1 upvote
Teila Day
By Teila Day (Apr 1, 2013)

That's been happening in the field of Law since day one. Think of how many people have to be told what it was they really said as opposed to what people remember themselves as saying. Perhaps witnesses will be able to tell what they actually saw, instead of swearing to what they *think* they saw.

0 upvotes
OnTheWeb
By OnTheWeb (Mar 31, 2013)

If Obama wore these would he be able to speak Austrian? No. Not even Google could pull that off.

0 upvotes
loadofcobblers
By loadofcobblers (Apr 2, 2013)

Obama is clearly not a Muslim as he now seems to be a relative of the Habsburgs.

0 upvotes
Uimeas
By Uimeas (Mar 30, 2013)

oh wow! looks like an interesting piece of equipment this, but whats the price looking like???

0 upvotes
rfsIII
By rfsIII (Mar 30, 2013)

Luckily, the technology for making sense of all those photos is at least years away, so the sheer volume of data is going to be its own protection for now. Think how hard it is to go through the 50,000 or 100,000 photos you have on your hard drive. Multiply that 100 times and then multiply THAT number by the billions of head-mounted cameras that will be in use soon. The Stasi and the CIA and the KGB and whatever other secret police will never be able to go through them all.

0 upvotes
AstroStan
By AstroStan (Mar 30, 2013)

I suspect most people are not interested in video-blogging their entire life and those who do will have no real audience unless they are celebrities who will manage that “reality”. The glasses will mostly be a consumption device for information and entertainment. But some of that information could create a brave new world.

An obvious app would be to combine real time facial recognition with Facebook and other resources that divulge personal information. Nearly anyone you meet could be quickly identified and labeled by the glasses. Labeling could include maps of relatives and friends along with sexual preference, mating status, occupation, hobbies, criminal records...

1 upvote
OnTheWeb
By OnTheWeb (Mar 31, 2013)

I suspect you are seriously wrong and a Billion facebook users and 300 million twitter users are going to be an awful big pool of tech extroverts.

The other shoe to drop is the search engine's uncanny future abilities to tie together seemingly unrelated stuff. People will soon be able to search by portrait (face recognition) and anywhere you've been on Earth and recorded will soon get tied together.... now, whether the public will be able to access it like the government will is another story.

0 upvotes
Teila Day
By Teila Day (Apr 1, 2013)

Actually a computer could find a particular face in a billion photos fairly quickly (relatively speaking). That technology has been around for at least a decade. It doesn't take much imagination to know how quickly such will be done a decade from now.

0 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Apr 2, 2013)

No, that's like saying targeted ads are useless because they don't have enough people to aim ads at viewers. Secret police server farms will do the face-matching at scale, so that humans won't have to.

0 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Mar 29, 2013)

I can see these as a target for mugging so Darwin will kick in. It will be easy to steal a pair of $500 sunglasses. Wear these and get mugged or punched in the face for being a naive borg cog. I do not want to make Google any more money for being the worlds largest privacy infringer. People who own stock in Google would buy them to push up the stock. Let them have Google Glass parties so they can check out their FB pages to see what loosers they are in reality and in cyberspace.

3 upvotes
tom sugnet
By tom sugnet (Mar 29, 2013)

To many people these will be perfect sleeping glasses.
Aliens and other intruders don't like cameras ;)

3 upvotes
AstroStan
By AstroStan (Mar 29, 2013)

The camera aspect of glasses is not really new or more invasive than hidden cameras contained in tie pins and the like.

The greater potential for good and bad has to do with the screen not the camera. The enhanced reality and escapist applications come with attendant distractions. Talking with a person wearing these glasses can be insulting as they simultaneously check their Facebook msgs or Google you on the spot. Distracted driving, walking, etc may become exponentially more rude and dangerous than texting. Most of the apps will center on real time advertising - an obvious app is a "city lens" overlay of store names and specials that float into the user's vision at every turn.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 15 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Obscura
By Obscura (Mar 29, 2013)

The lesson to be learned here is that if you're going to super-document your life, you had better be discrete and choose a hidden camera.

Sadly, because of the camera backlash, heads-up display technology has a giant new hurdle to overcome.

0 upvotes
Murka
By Murka (Mar 29, 2013)

I live in Portugal; I'm very interested in this matter,this gonna be a huge problem, we don't even have actualized laws for photography....

0 upvotes
d2f
By d2f (Mar 29, 2013)

"If you have done nothing wrong you have nothing to fear." This is the motto at Google and now the American government. Privacy left the building some time ago. Social media outlets, camera phones, security cameras, satellites, monitoring of email, web surfing, bank transactions, phone conversations, TV shows watched and things beyond those have done away with any sense of privacy. Now Glasses technology will invade your homes, work place, bathrooms, etc. etc. You will not know if and when somebody with Glasses is recording you and posting it to the web. The end user maybe surprised to find someday Glasses recording their actions without their consent. While people are focused on drones invading their privacy outside their home, with Glasses they will lose it everywhere, in and outside their homes. Since Glasses technology and drones are coming, the question is not privacy but instead who watches over the watchers, and can you trust them with your privacy?

3 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Mar 29, 2013)

Being law abiding citizens does not mean you dont have rights. The guilty conscience red herring is a bad argument. Law abiding citizens have all rights intact and should not be infringed upon just because one of the biggest corporations wants to team up with the govt and be a spy agency in the name of proffit. Just because you can does not mean you should in terms of being a willing idiot spy. Geeks will love this but it will infringe on reasonable expectations of privacy. This is not about the wearers rights but everyones rights. Having a networked spy machine is the danger not the camera or the advertising but the fact that this is networked. A go pro is not scary but a borg is.

2 upvotes
rfsIII
By rfsIII (Mar 30, 2013)

On the other hand, as in Russia, the cameras could offer some protection against the authorities by documenting their actions; you'll know you're in deep s**t if the first thing the cops do is break your glasses.

1 upvote
AlanG
By AlanG (Mar 29, 2013)

Albert Brooks thought of this concept many years ago in his movie "Real Life."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cAooL_B_uP0

I bet Google Glasses will become very popular in the amateur porn world.

1 upvote
Aaron Tsuru
By Aaron Tsuru (Apr 5, 2013)

POV porn is already huge (no pun intended?), this will only free up the other hand.

0 upvotes
Rmano
By Rmano (Mar 29, 2013)

If you want some possible scenario, read David Brin "Earth" or (more recent, technically nearer) "Existence" (worth to be read nevertheless).
Social implications of a fully on-line and transparent world are really intriguing.

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
liquid stereo
By liquid stereo (Mar 29, 2013)

This isn't going to change anything except for social misfits. They will recognized from afar.

2 upvotes
purelightglow
By purelightglow (Mar 29, 2013)

I want what camera's have to offer and hope the users put them to good purpose. Perhaps what people who don't want them need to do is hide; wear hoodies and transmit jamming signals

0 upvotes
Todd Ka
By Todd Ka (Mar 29, 2013)

These are disgusting. and should be illegal. Goodby privacy.

4 upvotes
Teila Day
By Teila Day (Apr 1, 2013)

You were fooled into thinking that you ever had "privacy" to begin with. The government (and military) and see into your home, listen to your conversations, track your movements, and monitor your business... the concept of "getting a warrant" is for people who don't know any better. Sheep. A warrant is about as realistic today as a restraining order... neither keep the really bad people, organizations, or governments from doing what they've been doing all along anyway.

0 upvotes
Atlasman
By Atlasman (Mar 29, 2013)

I think that society has taken privacy too far.

Cameras everywhere would bring about a new order of accountability.

I'm hoping this technology will be pervasive enough to overcome our privacy issues.

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Mar 29, 2013)

You do not have the right to infringe on others privacy or let yourself be hacked to be a tool for spying. Wear these at home if you want but not in public. Most people are not exhibitionists.

3 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Mar 29, 2013)

Is there a Dame Edna version?

.

2 upvotes
Paul Guba
By Paul Guba (Mar 29, 2013)

Resistance is futile. We are Google.

7 upvotes
jadmaister2
By jadmaister2 (Mar 29, 2013)

cyberangel...
no, it's no good, I can't the words. Don't you have better things to do here?

0 upvotes
CyberAngel
By CyberAngel (Mar 29, 2013)

Finally I can prove how rude the Finnish people at the customer service are - sometimes. There are so many cases that to believe it you just have to visit Finland. Remember to have your Googleware ready!
Yes, sure, it's seldom, but compared to ANY other country in Europe it's...unbelievable...

0 upvotes
sabink
By sabink (Mar 29, 2013)

hahaha - do not forget that countries like Romania and Bulgaria are also in Europe now. ;)

0 upvotes
biciclistu
By biciclistu (Mar 29, 2013)

Man, you desperately need these Google goggles! Romania was in Europe before.. Europe was in Europe :-)

1 upvote
Tan68
By Tan68 (Mar 29, 2013)

biciclisu, sabink may mean those two countries are more easily accessible to other people in.. Western Europe. he may have meant his comment in more a geo-political rather than political...

CyberAngel, are you Finnish? or do the customer serving people just just not like visitors..?

0 upvotes
Sea Hunt 2
By Sea Hunt 2 (Mar 29, 2013)

Most people in Finland are friendly. You met the wrong people in Finland. Sorry about that. The problem is that there are are unfriendly people everywhere.

0 upvotes
Leonp
By Leonp (Mar 29, 2013)

The real danger is when law or insurance will force us to wear cameras.

6 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Mar 29, 2013)

All done in the name of "Security"

3 upvotes
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Mar 29, 2013)

At first Google blitzkrieg everything in the search business, including books. This created some (for me a lot of) resentment. But Google seemed to have calmed down and did good PR on the world museums walk-through.
Maybe send grandma shopping to see what's on sale, literally.

0 upvotes
Kendall Helmstetter Gelner
By Kendall Helmstetter Gelner (Mar 29, 2013)

The main effect is: If you thought there were a lot of pictures of breasts on the internet before...

8 upvotes
Rupert Bottomsworth
By Rupert Bottomsworth (Mar 29, 2013)

I predict these glasses will be a flop.

1 upvote
TheEye
By TheEye (Mar 29, 2013)

There are lots of idiots who will buy this idiotic product to not only document the minutiae of their idiotic lives, but to also share all this tedium with other idiots.

7 upvotes
wakaba
By wakaba (Mar 29, 2013)

I predict that drones like Mrrowe8 will show us how exiciting their wagelives really are between leased Focus, cardboard Ikeahome, fatdepressed wife and limp ikids. Can^t wait.

0 upvotes
KWC3587
By KWC3587 (Mar 29, 2013)

I predict that everyone in this thread coming down on these will own one in the next year and their short memories will be unable to recall the fact that they were badmouthing it when they post their trip to Mcdonalds to their blog.

3 upvotes
Rupert Bottomsworth
By Rupert Bottomsworth (Mar 30, 2013)

@Mrrowe8 Do you always insult people you don't agree with?

0 upvotes
dark goob
By dark goob (Mar 29, 2013)

1984.

2 upvotes
Karroly
By Karroly (Mar 29, 2013)

I agree, but George Orwell was wrong on one point.
Big Brother will not be the guy that rules the world. As high-tech becomes quickly affordable to everyone, Big Brother can be you and me...

1 upvote
Retired electrician
By Retired electrician (Mar 30, 2013)

More like 2009, when dashcams became cheap, almost disposable. I've been driving with them for years, and I always wear one outdoors. $50 HD button, battery runs for about two hours recording. Call me paranoid, but I live in a hostile place. None of these videos were ever posted anywhere on the web (to answer concerns about "spam overtaking the floodgates").

The google novelty seems like many many steps back: conspicuous, needs broadband connection, limited built-in memory, and of course the cost (throw in custom optics for us glasswearers... and the need to have not one, but many sets of glasses). And no prospects of decent battery life - at least, in stock package. No deal from me.

0 upvotes
WildSammy
By WildSammy (Mar 29, 2013)

well and now will spam the world poor quality photos of everything and without any deeper meaning or value by millions of people who will photograph and share stupidities all around them.. just they see it.. congrats google! try to focus on something more useful for humanity next time :)

4 upvotes
Mrrowe8
By Mrrowe8 (Mar 29, 2013)

So photos are only to b taken by enlighten snobs ... Like u ? C'mon man thats art school speak, I know I heard plenty of that same crap fall outta fellow students mouths at art school yrs ago and its bull , this opens the world and only those with small minds see its limiting rather opening up the world at large and force the creative image makers to even greater hights

2 upvotes
Teila Day
By Teila Day (Apr 1, 2013)

Actually, since the masses have had easy access to HD video and excellent still photo quality, I've gotten MUCH more enjoyment looking at what the common man brings to photography and video as opposed to when it was dominated by professionals. Professionals didn't film their wild 150mph ride through city streets in a Ferrari, nor airplane landings in interesting Alpine resorts. Professionals didn't film or photograph great war footage as seen from an A-10 pilot's view. I've seen more *interesting* shots from civilians on the street than I have ever come close to seeing in professional (sanitized) work.

Sometimes I just want to see the real world, without having to think about a silly "deeper meaning". It's real-world videos that have forced many corporations to make a better product when Suzy Q and her friend start posting real life videos of which of their cars performs better in snow... the Audi or the Volvo wagon.
That's what people can relate to, not corporate ad crap.

0 upvotes
Gonard
By Gonard (Mar 29, 2013)

Next, I'm hoping there will be a camera watch. Then I'll be able to do street photography while picking my nose.

7 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Mar 29, 2013)

Camera wrist watches already exist: I got one, but never use it - it's thick and somewhat heavy. Has modes for video, snapshots and audio recording, though.

1 upvote
RobG67
By RobG67 (Mar 29, 2013)

Privacy? That's a non-issue. I'm more concerned about the ever-growing tsunami of complete and utter dross that we are expected to look at by those who think that just having a camera makes them a photographer.

After 6-12 months, these things will fall by the wayside, just like every fad does.

2 upvotes
cplunk
By cplunk (Mar 28, 2013)

Now were going to get all alarmed about these. But I've never seen anyone get too alarmed about their laptop's camera being pointed at them, and the room behind them any time it's powered up. I've read at least two court cases about these being used to track "missing" property (one from a public school district, sent home with a student. the other from a rental center).

I wonder how long before hackers start harvesting images off these?

0 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Mar 29, 2013)

Obviously it's already being done, as you point out.

Do you think this has occurred to anybody involved in the F.B.I., C.I.A., and N.S.A., with the billions and billions and billions and billions (and billions) of taxpayer dollars they have to waste tracking ordinary, law-abiding citizens?

They recruit a lot of kids, who have a high school fart joke, Beavis and Butthead ("You said corn!") mentality.

Put a piece of tape over it.

Comment edited 43 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Halstatt
By Halstatt (Mar 29, 2013)

The deal is that a couple of generations have grown up with no privacy concerns. And that has allowed any number of parties to ratchet up how much data is gathered on all of us.

When are they going to get that this is a cancer? When are they going to get that being fan boys for every corporate intrusion into their lives has a cost?

Because everyone is doing it is hardly an argument to allow it to become more pervasive.

0 upvotes
Chatokun
By Chatokun (Mar 29, 2013)

There's plenty hackers already doing this. Hmm, can links be posted here?:
http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2013/01/30/hacker-blackmail-stripping-webcam/
http://www.sophos.com/en-us/press-office/press-releases/2008/04/webcam.aspx
http://www.sophos.com/en-us/press-office/press-releases/2005/02/va_webcamspy.aspx

0 upvotes
Kendall Helmstetter Gelner
By Kendall Helmstetter Gelner (Mar 29, 2013)

You can see when a laptop camera is recording (light goes on). Does Google Glass have any kind of external indicator when it is recording or taking images? I'll bet not.

0 upvotes
Chatokun
By Chatokun (Mar 29, 2013)

Really? I don't recall any of my laptops having a light when the camera goes on. My alienware uses it to identify me for logon as soon as I open the lid... though it's possible I'm remembering wrong.

However, there probably is some way to do it... I recall a few news articles about someone who was caught based on the backend security software taking pictures of him. You'd think a light in that case would be obvious.

0 upvotes
Teila Day
By Teila Day (Apr 1, 2013)

Funny you mentioned "laptop cameras" being pointed at the user. The first thing I do when I pull a computer from the box is tape over the camera with a well-blending strip of black tape. I can't even tell you if the camera on my iMac works properly... I've never used it. There is no way on earth would I trust having a camera pointed back at me that's connected to a computer. No way.

One reason why I don't just paint over it is because I might want to use it as an additional security camera of sorts when I'm not home.

0 upvotes
TimT999
By TimT999 (Mar 28, 2013)

After reading all the possible uses of these glasses, it seems like a lot of hype for very little actual value. Lifelogging, helping fight crime, a spycam, proving to your spouse where you are -- what do any of these abilities have in a person's daily life?

It would be nice to have a camera that I can carry easily, but only if it were far higher quality than my camera phone. I don't see any killer app that's come out of the Google Glasses discussion so far. Just a lot of media hype that has more to do with Minority Report than a usable product.

2 upvotes
knize10
By knize10 (Mar 28, 2013)

Today's technology, tomorow's Made In China landfill junk.

8 upvotes
pedroboe100
By pedroboe100 (Mar 29, 2013)

It will be made in the US, how you like them Apples

1 upvote
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Mar 29, 2013)

Yes, a U.S. subsidiary of the parent company of Foxconn... ironic how the economic downturn has made it economically feasible to hire cheap U.S. labor.

0 upvotes
Jimmy jang Boo
By Jimmy jang Boo (Mar 28, 2013)

I don't see a PASM dial, hot shoe or a VF.

2 upvotes
Karroly
By Karroly (Mar 29, 2013)

no VF ?
These glasses ARE a big stereoscopic OVF with a built-in camera...
Note that the camera itself is not stereoscopic...
But IMHO, the main weakness of this gadget is the lack of optical stabilization to get sharp pictures.
A must-have for drunk users...
I am waiting for the 3D version with OIS, zoom, video, sound, night-shot capabilities and a full-day battery life...

2 upvotes
agentul
By agentul (Mar 29, 2013)

no bokeh, no buy! i demand that these have a FF sensor!

1 upvote
delastro
By delastro (Mar 28, 2013)

Google glass is a spy cam like a lot of other cams for sport and adventure. If you use google glass you must accept personal rights - if not you cant get a lot of problems in a lot of countries because it is nearer than streetphotography and it concerns the personal behaviour.

I think a bill will come for public areas and in private areas it will not be allwed.

1 upvote
justmeMN
By justmeMN (Mar 28, 2013)

With Google Glass, you can now spend 24/7 looking at a computer screen, disconnected from "in real life".

2 upvotes
inframan
By inframan (Mar 28, 2013)

Combatants, arm yourselves! The Google peek-a-boo wars have begun.

0 upvotes
photo perzon
By photo perzon (Mar 28, 2013)

Soon surgeons will implant the Glass into our eyelids where it will report every minute to the IRS and the cardiologist.

2 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Mar 28, 2013)

what if they made it a law that EVERYONE MUST have such a device and MUST record every waking moment in one's life? as well as EVERY interaction with every other person? would privacy really matter then? ...unless one wanted to do something bad/wrong/harmful (which can be subjective and relative) to others?

how would it compromise individual rights versus the 'collective' interests?

sdyue

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
drummercam
By drummercam (Mar 28, 2013)

ego-trippin' at it's technologically finest.

1 upvote
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Mar 29, 2013)

Well, since the glasses would record everything EXCEPT yourself...

0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Mar 28, 2013)

hmmm... google earth with such google-vision up the ante deep into human interior spaces anywhere people venture, they could record every room, corridor, pathway inside or out...

at least one then could virtually go 'anywhere/everywhere' people go physically, but do so virtually without ever going there [like any image collecting system, it could be usefully used or abused]

so, who would intentionally compromises private human spaces by recording them? plenty. rules will have to change drastically if 'everyone' is recording 'everywhere all the time'.

as for recording private video conversations, that's another matter altogether; that's already called unauthorized eaves-dropping/wave/wire-tapping.

google-vision simply makes it DIY from one's own 'eye-perspective' (and only less obvious than holding up a smartphonecam)

who remembers benicio del toro's pool scene [to nullify eavesdropping] in movie 'traffic'?

are electronics waterproofed to work under water too...

they will!

sdyue

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 11 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Total comments: 127
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