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Photographer turns to iPhone for creative wedding shoot

137

Sephi Bergerson is well-known for his documentary-style wedding photography in India

Bergerson has created a niche for himself with his spontaneous approach and "real" photos, which he also employs in his food photography showcased in his book Street Foods of India and editorial work for corporate clients.

He also counts himself an iPhoneographer. His love for mobile photography can be seen in his blog posts in which he discusses the medium. "You might not realize it yet, but this is as big, or even bigger, than the invention of the digital camera," Bergerson recently posted. Last month, he took this passion for shooting with his iPhone 4S and put it to good use with a bride and groom, Rishita and Kintan Brahmbhatt, who hired him to shoot their wedding in Gujarat in western India.

Bergerson shot the more formal wedding events with his DSLR, but chose his iPhone for a more casual shoot with the couple after the ceremony.

Indian weddings are generally elaborate and filled with a number of formal events. After all that jazz, a post-wedding shoot in an abandoned bus and streets of Gujarat seemed like a perfect idea to unwind for both the photographer and the couple. 

"I had a great opportunity to work with a couple who were open minded enough to let me do their couple shoot with the iPhone and not my regular DSLR," Bergerson said.

The day started off with a few shots against the backdrop of Gujarat's ancient step-well Adalaj. While pausing for a break over Gatia, fried green chillies and hot chai, Bergerson decided to take a few shots with his phone on the streets nearby and Instagram them on his feed, @fotowala. They even got passersby to take part, pausing for a group shot that shows off the local culture. 

"The iPhone shoot gave us a chance to move around and try out different things quickly," recalled the bride afterward. "Because of the spontaneity, we had a great time and it shows, versus pictures with posed fake smiles. Also we love the Polaroid effect."

Bergerson used Polamatic to acheive an old-school Polaroid effect and edited the images with Snapseed  before Instagramming them.

"On the way to the airport after the shoot, I quickly edited and shared them with the couple," Bergerson described. "It was such a new experience and we all loved it. Maybe not award-winning images, but we have some great memories."

After a successful first experience with Mr. and Mrs. Brahmbhatt, Bergerson is looking forward to incorporating the iPhone into more wedding shoots in the future.

Comments

Total comments: 137
12
vinersan
By vinersan (May 17, 2013)

i'm a professional photographer and i use a ff slr with a lot of L lenses, and i thought about using something smaller in some situations (bride preparations ...) where the space is small sometimes and you don't want to get to much in the way .
but it never crossed my mind to use a cell pone !!

i would use a sony nex-3n wit a decent prime (or better, a nex-6 with evf ), but never a cell phone !

i'm really starting to think that this type of articles are damaging to photography in the long run ...

0 upvotes
Joseph Palmer
By Joseph Palmer (Jan 30, 2013)

@shutterhappens .. I think the point is the photos are not meant to be professional, as the writer states, the photographer used his DSLR for the ceremonies. And so these were relaxed shots -- hanging out, goofing off. I don't think these kinds of shots need a DSLR to accomplish. Granted, you are so right on all the technical limitations -- he wouldn't have been able to take those shots as well in low lighting or other situations where shooting with a compact camera just sucks.

We need to embrace all of the available technology out there and not just poo poo it because it goes against the very grain of our being, or our pocket books because we took the time to spend so much money on high end DSLR equipment and here comes someone with an iPhone getting accolades for his "non professional" looking photos.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
shutterhappens
By shutterhappens (Jan 30, 2013)

You won't be able to use flash, and you can't blur out the background, you can't adjust exposure, and you're limited to wide angle. The only advantage is you can quickly post the photos online and apply some predefined photo effects.

I still prefer DSLR. I like to have control, and I wouldn't post any photo without retouching them in photoshop first.

The results speak for themselves. The photos samples look like snapshots and not professional photos.

1 upvote
rondhamalam
By rondhamalam (Jan 28, 2013)

I cannot edit photo on pathetic small screen like iPhone5... need bigger HD screen, like Galaxy S3...

Comment edited 55 seconds after posting
1 upvote
wlachan
By wlachan (Jan 28, 2013)

Whatever works.

1 upvote
maboule123
By maboule123 (Jan 28, 2013)

Congratulations!!
Back in the 35mm era I used to have my artillery of SLR to shoot weddings and other contracts too. But the best images I could manage to shoot, and having fun while doing it, was with my little Minolta 110 The yellow one with the underwater casing. Then I bought the Agfa with the little motor drive (what a luxury it was) The last one to add to my 110 collection was the Pentax 110 SLR with interchangeable lenses and motor drive.
Great captions from the iPhone.
Way to show how to use, and not how to flash a tool.

1 upvote
stevens37y
By stevens37y (Jan 28, 2013)

this is the 'Nu Lomography'.

0 upvotes
Rage Joe
By Rage Joe (Jan 28, 2013)

I-phone Advertisement. poor.

2 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Jan 28, 2013)

... so articles about "Canikon" shooters is also "Canikon" advertisements? If you do not like product names getting presented in a positive light in articles, start your own site where you either anonymize products or exclusively write negative stuff.

1 upvote
Sammy Yousef
By Sammy Yousef (Jan 28, 2013)

Publicity stunt.

4 upvotes
JimSocks
By JimSocks (Jan 28, 2013)

shots look ok. I wouldn't pay someone for them though. they look like vacation photos.

3 upvotes
pfzt
By pfzt (Jan 28, 2013)

Well, fine, then let's have a look on your vacation photos, i'd really like to see thoseā€¦

1 upvote
JimSocks
By JimSocks (Jan 28, 2013)

k, added a couple's shot I took at a small dam last fall in my gallary.
and i'm buzzed (hence why I was willing to actually go in the water with my camera). all impromptu. imagine if i was actually trying to compose romantic wedding shots.

0 upvotes
dholl
By dholl (Jan 28, 2013)

As much as I'm criticising the cult of phone photography, I also have to admit that your pic is not as nice as the pics from this article.

But good on you for accepting the challenge anyway!

0 upvotes
Magnus3D
By Magnus3D (Jan 27, 2013)

If this was done with a Android device the article would only mention that some smartphone or phone was used, but when it's a device from Apple they are forced to mention it by it's productname. That gives me a bad feeling.

4 upvotes
DonnyHiFi
By DonnyHiFi (Jan 27, 2013)

And I can go around on the Indianapolis Motor Speedway with a Toyota Yaris

3 upvotes
Mike Walters
By Mike Walters (Jan 27, 2013)

These photographs could have been taken with any compact camera over the past few years. Makes me wonder why the photographer hasn't done this before with a compact and if he has why was there not the fuss made about that. I din't think there is anything special about these photographs, a guest could have taken them.
All this frenzy over 'mobile photography' is all just pure hype. All photography is mobile , just because a phone is now as good as a compact why is it suddenly so fashionable?

7 upvotes
dholl
By dholl (Jan 27, 2013)

It's the cultists who are obsessed about Apple (who are really nothing more than a supercorporate immoral consumer goods company).

Furthermore, it's those failed photographers who are attempting to create a new scene, and trying to make this new scene seem better than the old scene, for this I presume makes them feel better about themselves.

Normally what happens now is a cultist will mention a successful photographer who also uses a phone for photography (but not for the real jobs, mind, just for promo work, if you know what I mean).

Amazon bought dpreview, and Amazon wish to sell more gadgets. Phones are inherently more sellable than dedicated cameras. Hence, dpreview have to promote phones with camera functions as if they are the greatest thing to happen to photography since the gods invented light.

10 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Jan 28, 2013)

That there is a cult of Apple users is one of the myths in the Church of Apple Haters. :)

0 upvotes
toomanycanons
By toomanycanons (Jan 27, 2013)

The guy had the history of shooting with his DSLR, so this couple knew he was a professional to begin with. He whips out his iPhone (or maybe any other point and shoot he had laying around) and says, now I'm gonna use this! They say, hey, you're the pro.

Next scenario: a couple is looking for a professional wedding photographer. Guy whips out his iPhone and says "here's my camera!" Couple says, thanks but we're looking for a photographer.

5 upvotes
cxsparc
By cxsparc (Jan 27, 2013)

It makes me sick in my heart to read stuff like this where an iphone-Enthusiast writes like there never was any compact camera available before:
"mobile photography" "bigger than the invention of the digital camera"
"The iPhone shoot gave us a chance to move around and try out different things quickly," .. "Because of the spontaneity, we had a great time and it shows, versus pictures with posed fake smiles. Also we love the Polaroid effect."

All this could also have been shot with a simple unobtrusive compact camera, which have been available for at least 7 years.
And recognizing this cliche filter effects on yet another picture
shows what apparently so many iphone users mistake for "creativity".

11 upvotes
RichGK
By RichGK (Jan 27, 2013)

At least 7 years? OK for digital but I had an Instamatic in 1978 and they have been available fora lot longer than that.

2 upvotes
Geodesiq
By Geodesiq (Jan 27, 2013)

Very creative. Nice use of color. Wait, is that masking tape???

0 upvotes
panpen
By panpen (Jan 27, 2013)

I've seen people with Canon 5DIII's taking horrendous pictures of their cats using 85Ls and countless people that could take better pictures with a box and a hole in it. It's all about the human behind the camera. Spending tons of money doesn't make anyone a PRO

Comment edited 44 seconds after posting
8 upvotes
randyckay
By randyckay (Jan 29, 2013)

However absolutely true what you say is, on the other hand, one cannot deny that the author of the article gives the impression of discovering "compactness" in picture taking. Any brand, Panasonic, Olympus, Canon, etc..., they all have all compacts that fit in a pocket and which take far better pictures than an iPhone, or any camera phone for the matter.

For serious photography (photos with good detail, that can be seen at, say, 8x10, etc...) camera phones are absolutely useless.

0 upvotes
vinersan
By vinersan (May 17, 2013)

i'm a professional photographer and i use a ff slr with a lot of L lenses, and i thought about using something smaller in some situations (bride preparations ...) where the space is small sometimes and you don't want to get to much in the way .
but it never crossed my mind to use a cell pone !!

i would use a sony nex-3n wit a decent prime (or better, a nex-6 with evf ), but never a cell phone !

i'm really starting to think that this type of articles are damaging to photography in the long run ...

0 upvotes
madeinlisboa
By madeinlisboa (Jan 26, 2013)

Wow! Looking at these magnificent shots I wonder if my 6 year old son is also a professional...

4 upvotes
Mdphotovideo
By Mdphotovideo (Jan 26, 2013)

In today's photography market why does Everyone feel they can be a professional photographer. It takes years of experience and a huge financial commitment to became a successful social event photographer.

People be aware just because you call yourself a professional does not mean you are. When you decide to do stupid things like shoot an event with an iPhone you bring a sense of amateur status to you and you lower industry standards. Please stop or go find another job that accepts crappy work.

6 upvotes
BitFarmer
By BitFarmer (Jan 26, 2013)

I always wanted to know the fellow that traces those red thin lines separating pros from us, mere imitations... nice to finally know you, master!

1 upvote
Stollen1234
By Stollen1234 (Jan 26, 2013)

i understand what you mean..but professional means that you are making photography for a living..industry standard?? i quess the standard is up to each photographer... now if you are successful means you are doing good photos and your clients are happy and very satisfied.
now if you are carrying arround expensive and first class equipment for years and you got no talent or your results are bad then you are not a professional

0 upvotes
panpen
By panpen (Jan 27, 2013)

Spending a ton of money doesn't make you a pro

2 upvotes
Geodesiq
By Geodesiq (Jan 27, 2013)

Feeling insecure that you can't compete with more creative photographers?

3 upvotes
Mathewj23
By Mathewj23 (Jan 29, 2013)

A huge financial committment is not always necessary. I shoot with a 4 year Nikon D60 and a 50mm 1.8 for most of my client's work and they love it.
Ofcourse eventually I'd love to buy a full frame body and quality glass with the money I get from assignments.

0 upvotes
Nismo350Z
By Nismo350Z (Jan 26, 2013)

If the photographer wanted to make a big deal about using the iPhone as his main camera, then he should have taken the actual wedding with it. These photos have no depth-of-field so they certainly look like snapshots taken with a camera phone.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
rondhamalam
By rondhamalam (Jan 25, 2013)

Does it have quad core and multiple windows on a large screen like Galaxy S3?

2 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Jan 27, 2013)

No. Does it need to to take good pictures? Also, S3 has smaller screen than the Note, so it is not large.

0 upvotes
rondhamalam
By rondhamalam (Jan 28, 2013)

Yes, LARGE SCREEN is very important for editing and onsite shot reviews... BRILLIANT :)

Oh the speed for processing is also very important.. from QUAD CORE !!!

0 upvotes
Tom Caldwell
By Tom Caldwell (Jan 25, 2013)

The general tenor of the responses ranges from "cool" to a detailed criticism of the inadequacies of using a mobile phone in this context. Two things are clear, the photographer thought outside the box and the results were quite interesting. However the general rusted in cliched attitude towards expensive wedding photographs taken with expensive tools as the only way a photographer can earn his fee remains. We have to face it the best wedding photographers have to be something between a performing monkey with an eye to "suitable" (hopefull original) locations to difference his/her work and an expert photographer that gets it right every shot. It also helps to be very good at self-promotion and have the ability to extract a proper fee. None of this applies to mobile phone photography except the level of skill involved needs to be much the same.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Kim Letkeman
By Kim Letkeman (Jan 25, 2013)

Is it not an axiom that the photographer makes vastly more difference than the equipment? Do articles like this not do a disservice to brides everywhere? Are brides not already inundated with weak choices for photographers who already think it is acceptable to bring mediocre equipment to the church? Does this not risk mediocre images if the bride is lucky to get any images at all?

Seriously, should we not be putting disclaimers on such articles?

"WARNING: It takes massive skill and talent to shoot the most important day of the bride's life with a truly inferior camera. Don't try this at home."

And quoting the bride instead of the photographer? Is it really necessary to carry the camera in your shirt pocket for there to be quick movement between locations and spontaneity? Of course not ... the article is trite and that was just the obvious thing to say.

3 upvotes
Paul_B Midlands UK
By Paul_B Midlands UK (Jan 25, 2013)

like to see this professional use the IPHONE in dazzling bright sunlight, not inside a double decker ... then see how professional he looks.

1 upvote
jamesanthonycampbell
By jamesanthonycampbell (Jan 25, 2013)

So you would really setup a photo shoot in dazzling sunlight. No professional would do that unless forced to.

6 upvotes
Mir_ro
By Mir_ro (Jan 25, 2013)

Or inside a christian orthodox church, dark as a cave :)

1 upvote
Dave Oddie
By Dave Oddie (Jan 27, 2013)

@ jamesanthonycampbell:"So you would really setup a photo shoot in dazzling sunlight. No professional would do that unless forced to."

Wedding photographers often have little to no choice over location, weather and lighting but to use a phone camera successfully they would certainly want to manoeuvre the couple to areas of more forgiving lighting if possible - which they may not have to do with a better camera that has better dynamic range and noise handling. These safer locations may also not be the best photogenically either.

When I got married years ago I had a friend take candid shots with his Canon EOS film SLR and I am sure a 35mm compact would have worked as well, but a Kodak Instamatic? No way. Same here for me. Use a Fuji X series or something similar if you want to be unobtrusive, not a phone.

In any case an iPhone isn't exactly a cheap "camera" anyway so what is he trying to prove?

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Rage Joe
By Rage Joe (Jan 30, 2013)

Or in direct sunlight in front of the church when everything is happening really quick. Some DR there, the bride in white and the groom in black. Good luck, you need it. I-phone even has the rice inside.

1 upvote
Mike604
By Mike604 (Jan 25, 2013)

I have shot thousands of weddings with my HTC ONE X. SInce last march!!! I agree with much that was said here and it was pretty brave to rely on an IPHONE to be your image maker but I can bet many many of the members on DPreview, regardless of the equipment and how advanced it may be, can do this to. Great marketing, very Steve Jobs esk......

0 upvotes
Tom Caldwell
By Tom Caldwell (Jan 25, 2013)

My you have been a busy boy (grin)

2 upvotes
jadot
By jadot (Jan 28, 2013)

Quote " I have shot thousands of weddings [....] since last March"

That's pretty intense. I'm a professional Wedding Photographer, and I don't think I even managed to fulfil 'hundreds' of weddings (sic) in the last 10/11 months.
Sure, I shot the odd snap here or there on an iPhone, but I mostly used my actual real cameras. You know - the tools that professionals use to get the job done properly with the most amount of creative input from the artist and not the software's idea of vision? Yeah, those ones.

Well done on those thousands of weddings, man. How do you do it?

http://www.alexanderleaman.co.uk

0 upvotes
Dhabits
By Dhabits (Jan 28, 2013)

Maybe he is a wedding crasher..?

1 upvote
Rage Joe
By Rage Joe (Jan 28, 2013)

I wonder how many batteries did this guy burn in his htc two, but he can't be a man because he doesn't smoke I-phones?

0 upvotes
JEROME NOLAS
By JEROME NOLAS (Jan 25, 2013)

Pics are fine so who cares what he used, obviously peple who spent $10. 000 on their equipment will disagree....

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 15 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Mir_ro
By Mir_ro (Jan 25, 2013)

what is "creative" about these shoots ? Nothing special.
There are much more creative shoots whit much less expensive cameras than the iPhone

4 upvotes
Quest21
By Quest21 (Jan 27, 2013)

Agree, there is nothing creative about these shots, it can be done with any cheap point and shoot cameras...

1 upvote
Bill_Clinton
By Bill_Clinton (Jan 25, 2013)

Not that exciting, Jerry Ghionis did the same ages ago and he had way nicer pictures:

http://jerryghionisblog.com/page/2

5 upvotes
Simao
By Simao (Jan 27, 2013)

Now this is the work of an artist and a real pro. Not the typical colorful Indian theme style photos above.

0 upvotes
JaFO
By JaFO (Jan 25, 2013)

What's next ?
Professional photographer takes picture with his gadget-that-has-a-camera-as-a-feature ?

Why do we even worry what was used as the source.
The result is what should matter instead of how he got there.

1 upvote
Daniel Lauring
By Daniel Lauring (Jan 25, 2013)

To me, this reeks of stupid publicity stunt. Just about any small camera would do this much, much better than the Iphone, and not be unwieldy. Why would ever choose the Iphone, with it's minimal dynamic range, for something like a professional shoot when there are much better options that are not onerous to carry?

12 upvotes
Stanchung
By Stanchung (Jan 27, 2013)

I think it's just for the instant gratification that phones bring to the table. Click, instragram, share. That's impossible with any professional DSLR without some sorcery involved.

0 upvotes
vinersan
By vinersan (May 17, 2013)

the 6d can do this as it has te software and wifi ...

0 upvotes
cinemascope
By cinemascope (Jan 25, 2013)

This iPhone and social media glorification is getting old and this whole connect website feels like its set up by grampas trying to catch up...
Get a life and stop glorifying what is really nothing special...
Time to grow up again...

21 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Jan 27, 2013)

Ah, you were the model for the Grumpy Cat pictures! :)

0 upvotes
gl2k
By gl2k (Jan 25, 2013)

Why does the headline explicitly state "iPhone" instead of smartphone ?
Wouldn't any other modern smarthphone with a decent camera work as well ? Even more since the iPhone camera is average at best.
That smacks so much like "WOW, look what an iPhone can do !!".
Using a decent Nokia gives a lot more headroom to play with.

8 upvotes
JaFO
By JaFO (Jan 25, 2013)

for the same reason most people refer to mp3-players as iPods ...

0 upvotes
Sean65
By Sean65 (Jan 25, 2013)

It's because smart phones are just naff copies of the iPhone.

3 upvotes
xtoph
By xtoph (Jan 25, 2013)

well, yes, of course you 'could' use something different; but apparently he used an iphone. the headline is perfectly correct; so why does it bother you?

arguing that something else has an incrementally better sensor kind of completely misses the point; if he needed a better sensor, he'd have used his dslr. part of the appeal of 'iphoneography' is that it uses nothing special, just the most common, default device of its kind. and it is pretty hard to argue that this whole technology segment--both the hardware and the software ends of it--the didn't start with the iphone. the point isn't to say 'look what an iphone can do that nothing else can', it is more like 'look what even just an iphone can do'. the essence of the statement isn't aggrandizing the device, it's emphasizing the lack of reliance on exotic devices.

2 upvotes
Tom Caldwell
By Tom Caldwell (Jan 25, 2013)

If we are going to get very specific, yes he might have used an iPhone, but any smartphone might have done the job.

1 upvote
AlfieJapanorama
By AlfieJapanorama (Jan 25, 2013)

Getting the moment is what counts, especially at a wedding. If the couple are happy, that's all that really matters...

3 upvotes
M35G35
By M35G35 (Jan 25, 2013)

Bottom line is if the couple liked it. For me there is nothing special here. But, I am not the one who has to like the picts.

1 upvote
Lawrencew
By Lawrencew (Jan 25, 2013)

the phrase 'pointless publicity stunt' springs to mind...

4 upvotes
tiberiousgracchus
By tiberiousgracchus (Jan 25, 2013)

Smile !! ah wait..incoming call

3 upvotes
Sean65
By Sean65 (Jan 25, 2013)

I think it's pretty cool. It's quite anti gear-head which is likely to anger many on this forum. With an iPhone you just concentrate on the picture and not the gear.

3 upvotes
JhvaElohimMeth
By JhvaElohimMeth (Jan 25, 2013)

stop saying stupid things, please!
If you want to concentrate on the picture there are many compact camera with fixed lens. Pentax Q, with 9mm, Fuji X100, Ricoh GRD IV, Sigma's compacts....

2 upvotes
Sean65
By Sean65 (Jan 25, 2013)

Nothing stupid about anything I said. If you want to concentrate on photography you can can use any camera you like. The fact that you choose to list a load of cameras confirms my point. You're a gear head and you know it. lol

4 upvotes
Mir_ro
By Mir_ro (Jan 25, 2013)

what "antigear" ? . The iPhone is much more expensive than many DSLRs .... or P&S cameras ( if you want to "concentrate" on the picture )
Only an amateur need to "concentrate" on the gear when shooting.

2 upvotes
Sean65
By Sean65 (Jan 25, 2013)

That's nonsense. I shoot professionally and I concentrate. But you're really trying hard to miss the point now because I didn't mean concentrate in that context anyway. Price is also irrelevant in this discussion.

2 upvotes
Mir_ro
By Mir_ro (Jan 25, 2013)

what did you mean by "concentrate" in this context then.... ?

0 upvotes
photo_rb
By photo_rb (Jan 25, 2013)

I think you made an excellent point. In some ways, It's kind of like working with a Diana.

0 upvotes
Sean65
By Sean65 (Jan 25, 2013)

Concentrate as in focus your attention. What I like about this type of photography is that you don't really have any photographic control other than compositional. All these shots are well framed snap shots with great colours and and that lovely light you only seem to get in India.
In other words, there's a nice shot to be snapped or there's not. If you can't see the shot you can't take the shot and no amount of camera equipment would change that.
I like snap shooting and I've always admired someone who goes out shooting with little regard for their equipment. Their focus is not on the gear it's on the photography.

0 upvotes
Tom Caldwell
By Tom Caldwell (Jan 25, 2013)

Sean, your comment worked

0 upvotes
Dave Oddie
By Dave Oddie (Jan 27, 2013)

I find it very hard not to focus on the gear whenever I try and take a photo with my phone because it's a pain in the neck to use compared to a camera and no I am not trying to fiddle with settings or anything, just to get the thing to focus on what I want and to take a snap shot.

And just like many cameras that don't have a viewfinder its pants trying to use it in bright light. Compared to my current d-slr which is one of the most intuitive and ergonomically best cameras I have ever owned the phone just gets in the way.

0 upvotes
Digitall
By Digitall (Jan 25, 2013)

Pimp my wedding.

I did not want my wedding photographed with a Smartphone. The idea is interesting as show-off, but nothing more than that. Worthless as a legacy of a wedding to show to future generations for our family. It just shows a lack of taste and sensibility. I would not want to see the face of my parents and greenish yellow intentionally, to revise their wedding photographs. And much less in size as Poloroid pictures.

3 upvotes
Jeff Greenberg
By Jeff Greenberg (Jan 25, 2013)

No more Whites, Blacks, Hispanics, Asians.
No light skin or dark skin.
Its official, everyone is orange.

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
23 upvotes
tiberiousgracchus
By tiberiousgracchus (Jan 25, 2013)

Excellent lol

0 upvotes
Nishi Drew
By Nishi Drew (Jan 25, 2013)

Looks like happy snaps and not something you'd pay someone to take, the colors are better than %98 of super edited instagram esque shots at least...

I see this as an excuse to 'save shutter count' on the main camera, which then is telling the couple "I don't want to waste my DSLR life by shooting these boring post wedding shots, I'll just use my iPhone."

And can these be printed at reasonable size?
... I didn't think so

2 upvotes
jamesanthonycampbell
By jamesanthonycampbell (Jan 25, 2013)

Actually you can print them, and large. I've printed iPhone 4S shots at 11x14 no problem. I've printed iPhone 5 shots that literally look just like my DSLR so that I don't even need to tell anyone what camera I used. The point is to get the photo, not the device. Best not to jump to conclusions, unless you are trolling, in that case troll on.

2 upvotes
hc44
By hc44 (Jan 25, 2013)

They look good but that's largely due to post-processing. He limited himself when he chose the iPhone and only did it to draw attention to himself, that's not putting the customer first.

Also the whole instragram look feels like another fad - how are they going to react looking at these 20 years from now? Too bad the originals were taken with a POS (Piece Of...) camera.

4 upvotes
Jon Ragnarsson
By Jon Ragnarsson (Jan 25, 2013)

Seems to have worked. He got on the frontpage on one of the most popular digital camera web site. :)

Not sure if clever or just hipstery duchebag photographer...

0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (Jan 25, 2013)

ANOTHER "Pro photographer uses an iPhone" article? Wow. groundbreaking.

Can we move on? It's been done. Over and over again.

6 upvotes
88SAL
By 88SAL (Jan 25, 2013)

Bump. I dont need an article about another wedding shot with iPhone. It is still inferior to a quality compact, more expensive as a device (for latest model) whack an eyefi in and you have connectivity. Iphone is now redundant given this argument. What do we draw from our discussion here? Stop treating the iPhone like its some prodigy when in reality its an underachiever as a device compared to any real camera, compact to SLR. I dont care if it can make a phonecall, that is irrelevant to this discussion.

5 upvotes
jamesanthonycampbell
By jamesanthonycampbell (Jan 25, 2013)

Agree. It's not about device.

0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (Jan 25, 2013)

On the bright side he probably didn't miss any calls while he was shooting the wedding.

1 upvote
Edlolim
By Edlolim (Jan 25, 2013)

Each to their own, I guess.

maybe a marketing 'thing' in huge pops???? Who knows!!!! Afterall money YELLS ;)

Cheers

0 upvotes
marcio_napoli
By marcio_napoli (Jan 25, 2013)

Many here are entirely missing the point, which is fairly obvious, IMO.

It is as simple as that: forget the mobility talk, just erase this part. It all comes down to gathering as much attention as you can (that could easily be called marketing).

That guy succeded on that task in spades: his shoot is here, published on DP review, and seen all across the world.

That's the power of an idea, and the power of creative marketing.

You know this guy's name now. Before that shoot, maybe you didn't.

Just a (really, really) clever marketing stunt. Nothing at all to do with quality or mobility.

11 upvotes
SirSeth
By SirSeth (Jan 25, 2013)

A agree in part. It's a great stunt and is great for publicity, but some people are just "why not" people who are not anal about how others define creativity and "pro"-fessionalism. Lo-fi can be cool and different. And his pictures are fantastic imo. It's not like he used his iPhone for the whole event either.

2 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (Jan 25, 2013)

Marcio, I wish I could give you 10 "likes", not one.

2 upvotes
JhvaElohimMeth
By JhvaElohimMeth (Jan 25, 2013)

questo è verissimo, (anche se io il suo nome già l'ho scordato XD)
Spero non demolisca i ricordi di altre coppie con l'iphone! Vai! TUtti color salmone e stampette alla instagram.
"Aspetta che scatto, un attimo non ha focheggiato, ok, no aspetta il ritardo allo scatto"
come pubblicità ok, nella pratica però si fa credere che un iphone (perché gli altri smartphone le foto non le fanno?) sia tanto figo da poter fare i matrimoni.
Con una Pentax Q + 9mm hai un effetto simile ma con una macchina fotografica vera. Se poi vuoi qualità c'è sempre la fuji x100...

0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (Jan 25, 2013)

Marketing your wedding photography to other photographers doesn't really effectively grow your business. Nothing more than bragging rights really.

And would you link this to your clients if it were you? I wouldn't. It's pretty critical of his work. Which is marginal at best. And to be honest, I've already forgotten his name.

3 upvotes
gsum
By gsum (Jan 25, 2013)

"That guy succeded on that task in spades: his shoot is here, published on DP review, and seen all across the world".

And instantly forgotten.

0 upvotes
scrup
By scrup (Jan 25, 2013)

What is the point of this?

If you are going to take a photo use the best equipment you have access to.

slr
compact then
phone

Comment edited 47 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
jamesanthonycampbell
By jamesanthonycampbell (Jan 25, 2013)

Wow, didnt know there were rules for photography based on sensor size. Great work.

0 upvotes
jadot
By jadot (Jan 28, 2013)

There aren't necessarily rules when it comes to the philosophical question of capturing something & telling a story - being in the right place at the right time with whatever device/tool you have, but technically, scrup is just about right; If you can shoot and process images like the ones in this story on a more flexible & capable camera then you probably should.
We all know that this is a marketing stunt, and IMO shooting portraits for paying clients with 'only an iPhone' is insulting those clients.
This story would make more sense if the photographer proclaimed that he had dumped all of his other gear, but I doubt he's that confident.
It's flippant at best to turn up to a paid photo shoot with a gimmick device, especially when the client knows that you have the gear that could take this to the next level. Shoot the pictures, edit and process them and give the client the best quality images that you can.
Instagram is great, but it's a lazy approach, unless there's real commitment.

0 upvotes
rondhamalam
By rondhamalam (Jan 25, 2013)

Galaxy S3 is much better camera.

2 upvotes
Quest21
By Quest21 (Jan 25, 2013)

Galaxy is cr@p...

Strong noise reduction and sharpening create 'mushy' low-contrast detail.

http://connect.dpreview.com/post/9831991152/samsung-galaxy-s-iii-camera-review?page=10

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
rondhamalam
By rondhamalam (Jan 25, 2013)

G S3 screen is much larger than iPhone 5.
And the quad core is faster.
And the exclusive multiple windows run on G S3 makes the iPhone 5 like a children toy.

1 upvote
Quest21
By Quest21 (Jan 27, 2013)

The only thing that is better on G S3 is longer lasting battery :))) And enjoy your mushy photos:)))

0 upvotes
RudivanS
By RudivanS (Jan 24, 2013)

It's his - shtick -. If only the d800e where as handy :)

0 upvotes
jj74e
By jj74e (Jan 24, 2013)

I don't understand pros using an iPhone. You want mobility so you drop all the way from a DSLR setup to an iPhone? What about losing the tripod/reflectors/accessories? Using a smaller DSLR or mirrorless cam?

The beauty of mobile photography is not in that it gives professionals a unique approach; the beauty comes from accessibility, that suddenly so many more people can take photos on the spot without having to make space in their jeans or budget for another camera.

You're telling me you need an iPhone to move around quickly? Sure it's fun, and the photos aren't bad- but that's what I say to describe my friends or my own photos, for Facebook that is. Not for professional work.

Not to be anal about professionalism (I'm not one myself; i'm speaking as a person who wants their wedding photographed), but there's a line between spontaneity and losing why I'm paying you.- because in essence these are shots more any of my friends would take for free.

13 upvotes
larrytusaz
By larrytusaz (Jan 24, 2013)

I could not agree more. The professional could've used a Sony RX100 or Olympus E-PM2 etc and had FAR better quality yet in a smaller package. (Or a smaller DSLR like a Nikon D5100.) If lower quality is the goal, I guess chefs should renounce fresh ingredients, mincing, and cooking from scratch--and start serving their guests Hot Pockets. Those who actually cook are "so in the past."

I will, In fact, go so far as to say this: here in the USA, where we love our freedoms (I say that because I realize this shoot was in India), I am starting to actually be of the opinion that in order for one to promote themselves as a "professional" photographer, you should have to be licensed or pass an exam for it, just as if you were to become a doctor or a lawyer. And the first rule would be--you absolutely are forbidden from using a smartphone for your work, period, end of discussion. Violate this sacred standard & your license is permanently revoked for all-time. We've GOT to have SOME standards.

8 upvotes
javidog
By javidog (Jan 24, 2013)

License to be a photographer?? You have got to be joking seriously. Thankfully we have NO standards and no one in their right mind would agree with this Nazi policy or else cameras would be reserved for the elites, as in the early days, and the entire world would have missed out on millions of brilliant images and talented image makers.

6 upvotes
larrytusaz
By larrytusaz (Jan 25, 2013)

Where it regards being a PROFESSIONAL, I'm absolutely as serious as I can be. Where it regards someone buying a camera or smartphone & using it however in their own realm, sure, go right ahead. "Free the people" as it were.

But if you put yourself out there as being a bonafide full-blown four alarm professional--yes, you should have to pass an exam or license to do that, I think. I didn't feel this way before at all, but with the proliferation of this silly i-Phony-Photography being used in paid-for shoots, and with the proliferation of things such as shots being crooked on-purpose, I now feel this way.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
lecoupdejarnac
By lecoupdejarnac (Jan 25, 2013)

I'm not usually one of those 'the free market is the answer!' types, but in this case I think it applies.

Licensing requirements would make no sense: their work speaks for itself and anyone can choose who to hire based on their portfolio; other details can be stipulated in a contract.

0 upvotes
JhvaElohimMeth
By JhvaElohimMeth (Jan 25, 2013)

Fuji x100 is the answer for this kind of pictures

1 upvote
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Jan 27, 2013)

Every trade at some point wants to "protect" its "guild" by trying to add obstacles for others to practice the trade, thus minimizing competition. Adding requirements that you need expensive tools as well is just a bonus.

But do you really think e.g. cooks are "unprofessional" unless they use state-of-the-art induction stoves and ovens with a hundred different programs?

0 upvotes
larrytusaz
By larrytusaz (Jan 27, 2013)

No, we just want to maintain some standards of the community, and keep the cockroaches and other vermin from polluting the neighborhood.

1 upvote
Rage Joe
By Rage Joe (Jan 28, 2013)

For God's sake, if you respect yourself at all as a professional photographer (and your customers for that matter ) and you want to go small, go buy something like a Sony RX1, Fuji xpro1 or Fuji x-100s and quit fooling everybody, including yourself.

1 upvote
DFPanno
By DFPanno (Jan 24, 2013)

Agree with javidog.

I enjoy the output of each of my cameras, be it 5D3, RX100, or iPhone.

All capable of "capturing the moment".

In the end the ability of the image to captivate and entertain is more important then its technical quality.

If the couple likes the processing God please 'em.

6 upvotes
javidog
By javidog (Jan 24, 2013)

An image is an image and we should all be eternally curious about what every camera can accomplish or not. I used to play around with my parent's polaroids and 110's and have had a curiosity about cameras ever since. I am now a dreaded 'professional' who makes a living out of it but I do not get the auto-dissing of new technologies and, in particular, mobile photography. It is certainly not going away ANYtime soon so embrace it and explore what it can do for you.

4 upvotes
G3User
By G3User (Jan 25, 2013)

Making a living? I don't believe anyone can make a living anymore from Photography with everyone using their cell phones. The cell phone is killing paid photography gigs. You say a living? What is a living? $25K, $50K, $100K? You would have to shoot many senior portraits and weddings to make $50K a year these days.

These cell phones have destroyed professional photography. And DPreview is promoting the demise of paid gigs by promoting this cell phone crap. I know wedding photographers who now have to take day jobs to make ends meet.

Some say this is a revolution in photography. To those who say this, I say B.S. Those who say this are the people who no longer make a living photographing and instead are now teaching. What a cop out, And that is the current status of photography: No money in taking photos but lots currently in teaching and workshops. The problem is if everyone is teaching, who will be the great photographers of the future?

1 upvote
javidog
By javidog (Jan 25, 2013)

All due respect G3user--talent ends out in the open for all to see. Nothing can contain talent, not even a cell phone camera. These teachers you mention have a very good function and cell phones are revolutionizing photography, not destroying it. But how can you blame DPreview for promoting the demise of paid gigs? And I know plenty of people (photographers included) who consider 'wedding photographers' BS. When did wedding photographers achieve elite status in the world of photography? The future of photography is small, connected, wearable devices/cameras. Google-like glasses which will photograph exactly what you are seeing without pressing a shutter: voice or touch activated. We may not be around to see it but it will be fantastic. Think of what photojournalism will be like!

1 upvote
Nishi Drew
By Nishi Drew (Jan 25, 2013)

@G3
The couple of 'Photo courses' I took in two different countries were both run by teachers who claim they're photogs and they indeed have the gear and knowledge of equipment and talk of their past experiences. But have NEVER shown any of their own work, they show off someone else's shot on Flickr and discuss it, the students might as well have been taking better pictures as the final projects were given a glance through and all given the same points based on meeting the requirements. It's ironic, you can't make a living being a photog, but you'll do fine posing as one and telling others that they could "shoot portraits and weddings and make money while having fun!"

0 upvotes
Tom Caldwell
By Tom Caldwell (Jan 24, 2013)

What is new? For-ever wedding guests have supplemented the professionals images with their own snapshots. They will also freely steal images the professional has made if they possibly can. To be a successful wedding photographer you must be a great showman and also pretty good at your craft. To actually make money you have to show that you can afford gear that none of the guests possess. If the guests get wind of the fact that their mobile phones are good enough then the professional guy with his huge bag of gear might easily be replaced by a "posing consultant" and let the mobile phone gallery rip.

2 upvotes
javidog
By javidog (Jan 24, 2013)

So many haters in DPreview! Why? An image is an image. The old dinosaurs feel threatened. Live and let live people. Your time on this earth is brief and finite. Your 'professional' 'dslr' photography is no better or worse than anyone elses--mobile or not. In the end, we all break even.

10 upvotes
Nishi Drew
By Nishi Drew (Jan 25, 2013)

Approach some potential clients and tell them "hi I specialize in iPhoneography, I don't use those ridiculous dinosaur cameras those are sooo last century. Shooting your wedding with an iPhone or DSLR makes no difference so show me the money."

4 upvotes
jamesanthonycampbell
By jamesanthonycampbell (Jan 25, 2013)

Agree. Embrace change or be swept away. Play around with new tech, it's fun. Stop taking yourself so seriously. If you are great photographer, you will get the shot and get paid. I bet ansel adams would take some amazing landscapes with an iPhone. ;)

0 upvotes
javidog
By javidog (Jan 26, 2013)

Who cares about the money or the effing client!!
"The instrument is not the camera but the photographer."
- Eve Arnold

0 upvotes
larrytusaz
By larrytusaz (Jan 27, 2013)

Some change doesn't need to be embraced, it needs to be destroyed in the arena of ideas and exposed for the folly that it is. We can only speculate what Ansel Adams would use if he were alive today, but you won't catch me taking landscapes with a fruit-phone. I have the decency to at least use a micro 4/3rds.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 137
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